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gellan


akwa
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cool.

it was a while ago and i jumped through the scholteshof website over it. very fascinating what you are doing.

vue

Thanks vue

We have been working hard for the past four years, but totally off the radar, as the heat got hot and the post 911 nyc struggled to restart

I think the ideas are fresh

As well, beginning a satellite pastry department,

cinq sens

collaborative without product/or reverse commercialization of creativity

akwa

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Hi,

I actually work for CP Kelco who makes Gellan, and working on Gellan project right now.

Gellan and agaragar is both heatable, it can be reheated. There are many 'grades' of gellan which will have different gelling temperatures. Agar is derived from kelp, whereas Gellan is from a bacterial fermentation. and is a hydrocolloid.

If you have specific questions, please let me know.

-NhumiSD

Edited by NhumiSD (log)
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Hi,

I actually work for CP Kelco who makes Gellan, and working on Gellan project right now. 

Gellan and agaragar is both heatable, it can be reheated.  There are many 'grades' of gellan which will have different gelling temperatures.  Agar is derived from kelp, whereas Gellan is from a bacterial fermentation. and is a hydrocolloid.

If you have specific questions, please let me know.

-NhumiSD

Hello Nhumi, thanks for the clarification.

Are you interested in developing recipes perhaps?

I am interested to learn regarding encapsulation, and have an opportunity to do some practical lab work in restaurant setting.

Interested in collaboration?

AKWA

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Hello Nhumi, thanks for the clarification.

Are you interested in developing recipes perhaps?

I am interested to learn regarding encapsulation, and have an opportunity to do some practical lab work in restaurant setting.

Interested in collaboration?

AKWA

Hello AKWA,

At the moment, I have my hands full and wont have outside time to do hands on work. I could keep in touch as to what you are trying to do, and help if I can.

What is it that you are trying to encapsulate, with the use of Gellan?

Like I have mentioned to others, please check out our website at www.CPkelco.com. You can request for literature on various Gellan products we have.

-NhumiSD

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Way cool. This thread shows exactly why I love this place. Interesting stuff. :smile:

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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Way cool. This thread shows exactly why I love this place. Interesting stuff. :smile:

duck duck goose

Nhumi

I would like to encase fabricated ice cream, and have an ice cream balloon

How pray tell

If youre busy can you send an "underling"

Where are our young food scientists?

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duck duck goose

Nhumi

I would like to encase fabricated ice cream, and have an ice cream balloon

How pray tell

If youre busy can you send an "underling"

Where are our young food scientists?

AKWA,

Will this ice cream be for consumption? If it is, then Iam thinking texture will be very important. Have you experimented with Gellan?

What kind of Gellan are you working with right now?

If you checked out the website at www.cpkelco.com it lists a few types of Gellan, low and high acyl content. This will give different textures when used. They also have different sensitivity to Calcium ions, which would be alot in ice creams.

You would have to initially hydrate the Gellan, then mayb dipping your frozen ice cream into the Gellan solution. Hydrating Gellan is tricky, and differed between the two Gellans. Both will require some amount of shear, probably in the kitchen setting, a blender might do.

-Nhumi

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Hi Nhumi,

I was looking at the cpkellco website and it mentioned "shearing" is this a reference to having it come in contact with an abrasive during its set-up time? Or is this a professional term that I have no idea what I am talking about.

Ducphat30

Patrick Sheerin

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Hi Nhumi,

I was looking at the cpkellco website and it mentioned "shearing" is this a reference to having it come in contact with an abrasive during its set-up time?  Or is this a professional term that I have no idea what I am talking about.

Ducphat30

Hi Duc,

Shearing implies mixing. It is usually done to easily hydrate the gum in a solution. Higher shear would be compared to a blender and low shear is just mixing with a spoon. The blade in the blender and the spoon are both cutting up the gum/water (shearing it up).

Hope this helps.

-Nhumi

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