Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

I know purists that will roast their coffee beans immediately prior to grinding their cup of coffee and drinking it immediately. If a shot of pulled espresso sits around at a Starbucks for more than 30 seconds or a minute, it gets dumped.

However, I have a brother-in-law who will walk into my house and if there is cold coffee still sitting in my pot and there are no moldy floaties on top, he'll drink it.

As I write this, I'm still sipping on a latte that Shawn made for me when I left for work this morning. He pulled the shots at 7:15 a.m. and it is now 1:30 p.m.

I consistently make an entire pot of tea and re-heat cups out of it for a day or so afterwards, despite the fact that I PREFER it fresh, just having it made and ready to heat is often easier on a busy morning.

What about you? How old is too old for you?

Link to post
Share on other sites
What about you? How old is too old for you?

Coffee brewed directly into an airpot or brewed and then poured directly into a pre-heated thermal carafe: no more than twenty minutes is ideal. After that I notice a perceptible change in flavor but I'll drink it up until it gets too cool to be drinkable. I do find that coffee which has started coolign off seems much tastier black than it does when cream has been added.

Espresso shots: if drinking it as a straight shot it should be served and comsumed immediatley (i.e. served withing 20 seconds of the shot being pulled and sipped over no more than a coupel of minutes before the crema dies off). If it's going itno a properly made milk drink and that drink is in a preheated thick walled china cup or a thermal stainless steel cup... it can stay drinkable enough for me to enjoy for up to 20 minutes or sometimes longer.

Can't comment on tea as I'm just not discerning enough.

I do know that rehated coffee that has beeen sitting around for hours and then gets heated up again is truly vile stuff.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't abide luke-warm coffee. And coffee re-heated in the microwave is truly an abomination. Hot and fresh or not at all.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites
Espresso shots: if drinking it as a straight shot it should be served and comsumed immediatley (i.e. served withing 20 seconds of the shot being pulled and sipped over no more than a coupel of minutes before the crema dies off).  If it's going itno a properly made milk drink and that drink is in a preheated thick walled china cup or a thermal stainless steel cup...  it can stay drinkable enough for me to enjoy for up to 20 minutes or sometimes longer.

Can't comment on tea as I'm just not discerning enough.

I do know that rehated coffee that has beeen sitting around for hours and then gets heated up again is truly vile stuff.

I'd agree with Owen and add that the more milk in the drink the longer it stays drinkable, 30 minutes is still a long time for a latte to sit around but it's much better than a 30 minute old cappuccino.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The longer the tea sits, the more acidic it's going to become.

Unless you are using laboratory-grade filters to strain the stuff after the initial brewing, there'll inevitably be some tea leaf particles left in the pot. They will continue to brew as long as a certain level of heat is maintained, & after about 7 minutes, they are mostly exuding tannic acid. Milk & sugar (which I never use) may mask this, of course.

TO answer the specific question: I always finish each pot before brewing the next. Takes 30-45 minutes to finish, depending on the size of the pot.

I always carry a thermos of tea when I'm on an excursion in the car, & it always acquires a certain amount of that "overbrewed" taste after a couple of hours. But that's still usually better than the available roadside alternatives. (The dreaded Tetley, etc.)

Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea!

- Sydney Smith, English clergyman & essayist, 1771-1845

Link to post
Share on other sites
The longer the tea sits, the more acidic it's going to become.

Unless you are using laboratory-grade filters to strain the stuff after the initial brewing, there'll inevitably be some tea leaf particles left in the pot.  They will continue to brew as long as a certain level of heat is maintained, & after about 7 minutes, they are mostly exuding tannic acid.  Milk & sugar (which I never use) may mask this, of course.

TO answer the specific question: I always finish each pot before brewing the next.  Takes 30-45 minutes to finish, depending on the size of the pot.

I always carry a thermos of tea when I'm on an excursion in the car, & it always acquires a certain amount of that "overbrewed" taste after a couple of hours.  But that's still usually better than the available roadside alternatives.  (The dreaded Tetley, etc.)

I usually brew only enough for one sitting and a re-brew

I use a timer or "eye ball the bubbles"

When traveling I use t-sac and hot water

joanne

Link to post
Share on other sites

Also... the better the quality of the coffee or espresso to begin with... the better it seems to hold up (or at least remain palatable). For my own tastes, acidic coffees or espresso blends don't seem to hold up as well when cooling off as the less acidic ones.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I know purists that will roast their coffee beans immediately prior to grinding their cup of coffee and drinking it immediately.

Excuse my geekiness but most purists don't grind the beans for at least four and up to 24 hours after roasting, during which time the beans cool and emit C02. If the beans are put in an airtight container before the 24 hours are up, the gas they emit will help keep them fresh.

What about you? How old is too old for you?

Drink espresso within seconds of being pulled. Espresso and milk drinks as soon as they're built. French press: pressed around two minutes after the water goes in and poured immediately. Filter, mixed with hot milk and put in a thermos: up to an hour though the second cup is never as good as the first. Everything is relative, of course. Filter coffee that's been sitting in a thermos for five hours might be shun-worthy at home but tastes like heaven on the cross-country ski trail.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Excuse my geekiness but most purists don't grind the beans for at least four and up to 24 hours after roasting, during which time the beans cool and emit C02. If the beans are put in an airtight container before the 24 hours are up, the gas they emit will help keep them fresh.

The resting period beans need depends on the roast and the beans being used. Most espresso blends need 48 hours of rest, some 72. An easy way to tell if the coffee needs more rest is to pull a shot, if it that hasn't gassed out the pour will be foamy. Ideally beans should be used from age 3 days old until 8 or 10. I have much more success using up my caffinated beans in that window than I do with decaf which usually takes closer to 14 days to use up a batch.

Link to post
Share on other sites
The resting period beans need depends on the roast and the beans being used.  Most espresso blends need 48 hours of rest, some 72.  An easy way to tell if the coffee needs more rest is to pull a shot, if it that hasn't gassed out the pour will be foamy.  Ideally beans should be used from age 3 days old until 8 or 10.  I have much more success using up my caffinated beans in that window than I do with decaf which usually takes closer to 14 days to use up a batch.

While I don't disagree with the above, I was referring to the earliest possible moment for grinding the beans for use in making coffee, not just espresso. If you want chapter and verse on this, I'm sure I can dig up some references. And besides, some people like the foaminess, especially if the beans are purchased; it's a sign of freshness and, with French press or filter, it doesn't affect the quality of the brew.

Link to post
Share on other sites
While I don't disagree with the above, I was referring to the earliest possible moment for grinding the beans for use in making coffee, not just espresso. If you want chapter and verse on this, I'm sure I can dig up some references.  And besides, some people like the foaminess, especially if the beans are purchased; it's a sign of freshness and, with French press or filter, it doesn't affect the quality of the brew.

I think you're talking about a different foamy than I am. I'm saying the espresso as it comes out of the PF spout will have huge air bubbles in it and it comes out as a stream of foam. I suspect you're talking about the clear soapy looking bubbles you get in a cup of coffee brewed with fresh beans. Coffee brewed with beans that haven't gassed out is thin, for the coffee to develop proper body the beans need to gas out. The bubbly crema is just a sign that the beans haven't had sufficent rest.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I think you're talking about a different foamy than I am.  I'm saying the espresso as it comes out of the PF spout will have huge air bubbles in it and it comes out as a stream of foam.  I suspect you're talking about the clear soapy looking bubbles you get in a cup of coffee brewed with fresh beans.  Coffee brewed with beans that haven't gassed out is thin, for the coffee to develop proper body the beans need to gas out.  The bubbly crema is just a sign that the beans haven't had sufficent rest.

Forget espresso. I'm talking about the foam that appears when I pour the near-boiling water on the ground coffee in a french press or filter. And aside from the inconvenience — I may have to wait for the foam to recede before I can add the remaining water — I've never noticed any lack of body or less than fully developed flavour in the resulting cup. But, hey, we agree on my original point (that one doesn't grind the beans immediately after roasting) and we're veering off topic; if you are dead set on continuing this discussion, it should probably be in a new thread.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Forget espresso. I'm talking about the foam that appears when I pour the near-boiling water on the ground coffee in a french press or filter. And aside from the inconvenience — I may have to wait for the foam to recede before I can add the remaining water — I've never noticed any lack of body or less than fully developed flavour in the resulting cup. But, hey, we agree on my original point (that one doesn't grind the beans immediately after roasting) and we're veering off topic; if you are dead set on continuing this discussion, it should probably be in a new thread.

We are indeed talking across eachother, back to the topic of Ms Tillie's stale coffee.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've found, over the course of study conducted during several all-nighters*, that iced coffee that becomes tepid is preferable, in general, to hot coffee that cools. There are other variables, of course, but at work I tend to nurse my morning Extra Large Iced Latte for most of the day!

-- C.S.

* I've also found that hydration is more important to general all-nighter health than caffeination, but that's another thread! Be sure to consult a doctor before starting any 'not sleeping much for a few days to get a lot of coding done' regimen.

Matt Robinson

Prep for dinner service, prep for life! A Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites
We are indeed talking across eachother, back to the topic of Ms Tillie's stale coffee.

In referring back to the entire discussion above, I know full well that fresh is better and ultra-fresh is best. I've actually all but given up coffee, except for a once-a-week-or-so latte.

I'm just hoping others might fess up to downing and suffering through old stuff out of laziness... :rolleyes:

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm just hoping others might fess up to downing and suffering through old stuff out of laziness...  :rolleyes:

I do at work. I make a cup when I get to my desk (one-cup coffeemaker) and sip it all morning. But I use good coffee and as Owen says that makes a big difference in its long-term drinkableness. Even after two or three hours it's still better than the food-service crap downstairs in the kitchen.

In the afternoon sometimes I resort to the espresso maker in the office next door. It's an automatic Lavazza machine that makes an espresso from a cartridge at the push of a button. It's not great but it's free caffeine.

"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

Link to post
Share on other sites

And then there's my former office partner.... who would fill his grungy plastic travel mug with straight black Folger's or the like for the morning commute, leave the unconsumed portion in the cup on the dashboard when he arrived at the office.... and then down the remaining swill on the ride home. Keep in mind that the days where he did this typically had an outside temp of 20 degrees F or lower. No concern for contamination but that was some vile stuff that he drank.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Objective Foodie
      During the past year, our coffee consumption at home has increased substantially. We have tried beans from different roasteries from the UK and Europe, but we are constantly in the search of new ones. The speciality coffee market has been rapidly increasing in past years and it is becoming easier to find high quality beans.
       
      The best roasteries we have tried so far:
      UK based: Round Hill Roastery, Square Mile, Monmouth,  Pharmacie, New Ground, Workshop, James Gourmet, Ozone. Europe based: The Barn (Germany), Gardelli (Italy), Hard Beans (Poland), Calendar (Ireland), Roasted Brown (Ireland), Right Side (Spain), Coffee Collective (Denmark).  
      Have you had any exciting coffee beans lately? Do you have any other recommendations?
    • By Kasia
      INSTEAD OF COFFEE? - MORNING GREEN COCKTAIL
       
      After waking up, most of us head towards the kitchen for the most welcome morning drink. Coffee opens our eyes, gets us up and motivates us to act. Today I would like to offer you a healthy alternative to daily morning coffee. I don't want to turn you off coffee completely. After all, it has an excellent aroma and fantastic flavor. There isn't anything more relaxing during a busy day than a coffee break with friends.

      In spite of the weather outside, change your kitchen for a while and try something new. My green cocktail is also an excellent way to wake up and restore energy. Add to it a pinch of curcuma powder, which brings comfort and acts as a buffer against autumn depression.

      Ingredients (for 2 people):
      200ml of green tea
      4 new kale leaves
      1 green cucumber
      half an avocado
      1 pear
      1 banana
      pinch of salt
      pinch of curcuma

      Peel the avocado, pear and banana. Remove the core from the pear. Blend every ingredient very thoroughly. If the drink is too thick, add some green tea. Drink at once.

      Enjoy your drink!
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Even though I would like to change the situation, the winter is coming. Sooner or later there will be sharp winds, frost and unpleasant moisture. I don't know how you like to warm up at home, but on the first cold day I dust off my home recipe for hot and yummy winter teas.

      You can use my recipe or come up with your own proposals for fiery mixtures. Only one thing should be the same: your favourite tea must be strong and hot.

      Ingredients (for 2 teas)
      Raspberry-orange
      8 cloves
      a piece of cinnamon
      2 grains of cardamom
      4 slices of orange
      2 teaspoons of honey
      your favourite tea
      50ml of raspberry juice or 30ml of raspberry juice and 30ml of raspberry liqueur
      Add 4 of the cloves, cinnamon and cardamom to some water and boil for a while to release their flavour and aroma. Remove the seasoning and brew the tea with this water. Crush two slices of orange with honey. Add the raspberry juice or a mixture of juice and liqueur to the tea. Next add the honey with orange. Mix it in. Decorate the tea with the rest of the cloves and orange.

      Lemon-ginger
      8 cloves
      3 slices of fresh ginger
      2 grains of cardamom
      50ml of ginger syrup or 30ml of ginger syrup and 30ml of ginger-lemon liqueur
      4 slices of lemon
      2 teaspoons of honey
      Add 4 of the cloves, ginger and cardamom to some water and boil for a while to release their flavour and aroma. Remove the seasoning and brew the tea with this water. Crush two slices of lemon with honey. Add the ginger syrup or mixture of syrup and liqueur to the tea. Next add honey with lemon. Mix it in. Decorate the tea with the rest of the cloves and lemon.

      Enjoy your drink!

    • By Kasia
      My Irish Coffee  
      Today the children will have to forgive me, but adults also sometimes want a little pleasure. This is a recipe for people who don't have to drive a car or work, i.e. for lucky people or those who can rest at the weekend. Irish coffee is a drink made with strong coffee, Irish Whiskey, whipped cream and brown sugar. It is excellent on cold days. I recommend it after an autumn walk or when the lack of sun really gets you down. Basically, you can spike the coffee with any whiskey, but in my opinion Jameson Irish Whiskey is the best for this drink.

      If you don't like whiskey, instead you can prepare another kind of spiked coffee: French coffee with brandy, Spanish coffee with sherry, or Jamaican coffee with dark rum.
      Ingredients (for 2 drinks)
      300ml of strong, hot coffee
      40ml of Jameson Irish Whiskey
      150ml of 30% sweet cream
      4 teaspoons of coarse brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of caster sugar
      4 drops of vanilla essence
      Put two teaspoons of brown sugar into the bottom of two glasses. Brew some strong black coffee and pour it into the glasses. Warm the whiskey and add it to the coffee. Whisk the sweet cream with the caster sugar and vanilla essence. Put it gently on top so that it doesn't mix with the coffee.

      Enjoy your drink!
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for swift autumn cookies with French pastry and a sweet ginger-cinnamon-pear stuffing. Served with afternoon coffee they warm us up brilliantly and dispel the foul autumn weather.

      Ingredients (8 cookies)
      1 pack of chilled French pastry
      1 big pear
      1 flat teaspoon of cinnamon
      1 teaspoon of fresh grated ginger
      2 tablespoons of brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of vanilla sugar
      2 tablespoons of milk

      Heat the oven up to 190C. Cover a baking sheet with some baking paper.
      Wash the pear, peel and cube it. Add the grated ginger, cinnamon, vanilla sugar and one tablespoon of the brown sugar. Mix them in. Cut 8 circles out of the French pastry. Cut half of every circle into parallel strips. Put the pear stuffing onto the other half of each circle. Roll up the cookies starting from the edges with the stuffing. Put them onto the baking paper and make them into cones. Smooth the top of the pastry with the milk and sprinkle with brown sugar. bake for 20-22 minutes.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       
       

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...