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Quick! Traditional Cantonese Dessert?


mudbug
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So why do I think bubur chacha needs to have lard in it (obviously the Ramadan connection rules that out)?  Am I confusing it with some Teochew sweet yam soup that has lard?

regards,

trillium

Were you thinking of those chewy opaque cubes you sometimes find in bubur cha cha? They are actually made of starch. Some people color it, some don't, but kids love it. You may have thought it was lard because the bubur cha cha may have turned oily due to over-boiling of the coconut milk. Here's another version of bubur cha cha from a friend's site.

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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I should have posted this earlier... oh well.

Any ideas on something I can make at home? Have access to most, but not all Asian ingredients. Any and all suggestions welcome... recipes and links to sites with recipes especially appreciated.

TIA

So, mudbug, tell us how your bday party turned out.

What did you make for dessert? :huh:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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So why do I think bubur chacha needs to have lard in it (obviously the Ramadan connection rules that out)?  Am I confusing it with some Teochew sweet yam soup that has lard?

regards,

trillium

Ahh - you may be thinking of or nee - the Teochew mashed yam sweet soup - lard is added to it to make it smooth. It's sometimes served with cubes of boiled pumpkin in it. Have tried a tau fu far and or nee combo :biggrin: in Singapore - sounds strange but it's actually quite good.

Yes mudbug, how was the party? What desserts did you do in the end?

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Ahh - you may be thinking of or nee - the Teochew mashed yam sweet soup - lard is added to it to make it smooth. It's sometimes served with cubes of boiled pumpkin in it.

The foochow version of or nee, or wor nay in foochow, is a dry dessert. It's sweet mashed taro with lots of fragrant lard... ohhh lard...hmmmm.

I've never had the teochew version. Does the mashed taro hold together in soup? Or is it like a porridge of mashed taro?

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The foochow version of or nee, or wor nay in foochow, is a dry dessert.  It's sweet mashed taro with lots of fragrant lard... ohhh lard...hmmmm.

I've never had the teochew version.  Does the mashed taro hold together in soup? Or is it like a porridge of mashed taro?

Yeah, I'm thinking of or nee, thanks guys.

I'd love recipes/methods for either version if any of you have 'em.

regards,

trillium

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I've never made wor nay and I've only had it in restaurants. Googling for it came up empty. I'm guessing that you make it just like mashed potatoes but use lard instead of butter, and add enough sugar to your taste. Might want to go with castor sugar as that'll probably melt easier? Traditional recipes will probably call for dissolved rock sugar.

If you ever try to make it let me know how it goes! I might want to try it myself. Miss that stuff.

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There! I saw it. I went to do grocery shopping at Foods Co, an American grocer. They carry sweet potatoes, just like the ones in the pictures shown in a previous note. They labelled them: "Red Yam"

Huh, I am not nuts after all.

Maybe it's a Californian thing?

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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There!  I saw it.  I went to do grocery shopping at Foods Co, an American grocer.  They carry sweet potatoes, just like the ones in the pictures shown in a previous note.  They labelled them: "Red Yam"

Huh, I am not nuts after all.

Maybe it's a Californian thing?

Californians tend to call sweet potatoes "yams", usually with a varietal name like "Garnet Yams." Where I grew up, in upstate NY, we always called them "sweet potatoes."

As a general rule, when in doubt, it's most likely a sweet potato. Yams are seldom sold fresh or whole, and are not even red-orange in color. In fact, they are seldom sold anywhere, except in ethnic specialty markets.

Obscene picture of sweet potato/yam orgy

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So, mudbug, tell us how your bday party turned out. 

What did you make for dessert?  :huh:

Where is mudbug when you need him/her? Maybe too much dessert and took a long ZZZZZZZZ...

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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  • 9 months later...

Since mudbug has awakened from her snooze...a long one at that...let's revive some of her threads.

BTW, we had this giant peach bao with many mini ones with lotus filling inside, recently, for my father's 80th birthday. After the dinner, the kids had a great time playing with the big hollow peach (2 of 'em), shall spare the details.

gallery_12248_1541_11382.jpg

Edited by Tepee (log)

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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So, mudbug, tell us how your bday party turned out.   What did you make for dessert?  :huh:

Where is mudbug when you need him/her? Maybe too much dessert and took a long ZZZZZZZZ...

Mudbug got distracted with other life issues and never had time to make any desert, although I am still constantly on the lookout for good, traditional recipes. I always thought it'd be fun to make a good mooncake but I'd want a good mold first.

Have you ever noticed that the desert section of Chinese cookbooks is almost non-existent?

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.

Have you ever noticed that the desert section of Chinese cookbooks is almost non-existent?

Probably because desserts are not a big thing with Chinese people. What is dessert in western world is more like snacks in Assian countries.

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Where is mudbug when you need him/her?  Maybe too much dessert and took a long ZZZZZZZZ...

Mudbug got distracted with other life issues and never had time to make any desert...

Looks like you finally woke up from your long ZZZZZZZZ! :laugh:

Have you ever noticed that the desert section of Chinese cookbooks is almost non-existent?

I agree with Dejah that China is a desert of desserts! :wink:

The desserts known to the newer generation Chinese are European influenced (such as egg tarts, cakes, even almond jello). About sweet dessert soups, I always wonder if they are genuine, classical Chinese that existed for hundreds/thousands of years, or also somehow are European influenced.

Red bean dessert soup and black sesame dessert soup are the staples. In the summer time, there are also mango/honey dew + tapioca coconut milk (like what origamicrane posted). I am sure in recent years they probably have figured out something else...

Edited by hzrt8w (log)
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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