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Hi all - just found out I'll be in Seattle for 5 days re: business. Wife took some accrued vacation at the last minute and will be joining me.

I've taken a look in your corner of eG - must admit I usually only lurk in the PA/Philly forum. At any rate, since my wife will be joining me, I would like to find some great food in nice places. (Not that I don't personally enjoy good food in nice places, but I would be fine just snacking at markets/street food/etc. if I were just by myself)

The only place that I currently have a reservation at is Cascadia.

After spending some time reading postings, I find it funny that many of you don't talk much about seafood! Great bounty probably leads you to seek out the "different" and interesting! :biggrin: Coming from an old east-coast city recently injected with great restaurants, I'd love to have some authentic, relaxed atmosphere, kick-a** seafood in the great PacWest!

We'll be at the Grand Hyatt on Pine, but happy to venture anywhere in the area within cabbing distance.

Thanks all!

Edited by vw8v (log)
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Great seafood in a casual atmo has got to be Matt's in the Market. There's been plenty of discussion of it if you do a quick search.

If you're more interested in the "fish house" kind of experience, you could consider McCormick & Schmick's, Elliott's or Waterfront.

I have also had some good meals at Ponti.

Edited by tighe (log)

Most women don't seem to know how much flour to use so it gets so thick you have to chop it off the plate with a knife and it tastes like wallpaper paste....Just why cream sauce is bitched up so often is an all-time mytery to me, because it's so easy to make and can be used as the basis for such a variety of really delicious food.

- Victor Bergeron, Trader Vic's Book of Food & Drink, 1946

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...must have dungeness...must have dungeness....

chant it 20 times and then go to Elliott's on the waterfront and have steamed dungie with drawn butter, and see why people get that glazed over look when talking about it. Classic Seattle. Have some oysters too while you are there, the season is just cranking up and there should be some good eats. Most here don't recommend venturing too far off the traditional seafood menu at Elliott's, as there's been a few not-so-wonderful experiences, but everytime I go there, I can't stop myself from having dungie and/or oysters.

Another classic would be Ray's Boathouse in Shilshole. Killer view of Puget Sound and the Olympics beyond, and usually very competently made seafood dishes.

Other notables: Matt's in the Market: put quite simply: GO HERE DON'T MISS IT. Must make a ressie as its a ~20 seat house and you'll do a LOT of waiting if you don't.

Anthony's, one right next to Ray's in Shilshole OR there's also one on the waterfront downtown. Some people don't like it, it is sort of corporate, but I've had some decent food there, and on a nice sunny day, either location is a good spot to sit and soak in some salt water vibes.

High End: Mistral, Lampreia, Rover's.

French: Cafe Campagne. Its almost a sin if you visit here and DON'T have brunch at Cafe Campagne. Will your visit include a Saturday or Sunday? Then GO. If not, consider dinner or lunch there, as they are also lovely. Also consider a visit to Le Pichet, a great little french bistro on 1st Avenue, known and loved by many.

You might also want to consider checking out Salumi, Armandino Batali's place in Pioneer Square, small, always jam-packed at lunch time, but great for grabbing a sammy and some cold cuts to go. If the mole salami is on the board, get some for knoshing in your hotel room.

That's a good start !!

Born Free, Now Expensive

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Tighe & Malarkey

Exactly what I was looking for! Thank you both much!

Salumi was already on the list. I'll give a call to Matt's and see if we can get a res.

I've heard of the steamed dungies - sounds like a winner as well.

Thanks again! I'll give an outsider's report once we get back!

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Salumi is only open Tues-Fri from 11 till 4 so plan accordingly. This is a deli so don't get all dressed up! :smile: I like to go a bit later as I find it's easier to get a seat at the communal table which is great fun.

I love Le Pichet for lunch or dinner, it's another reservation place because it's also small.

I think that any visit to Seattle should require a Tom Douglass restaurant, my personal favorites are Palace and Dahlia.

Also you may want to try a few happy hours, just went to Troiani on 3rd and Madison last night....AMAZING appetizers of seared ahi, crab cakes, grilled prawns, etc for $4 each!

Also in Belltown I think Marco's Supperclub has a good northwest vibe and the food and La Panier in the market for gorgeous baguette sandwiches or morning pastries is a gem!

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I think one of the best ways to sample dungeness is at one of the Chinese restaurants in the International District (ID). My favorite is Ho Ho Seafood Restaurant (predominantly Cantonese) at 653 S. Weller. They have a good-sized specials board with fresh seafood, in addition to a huge regular menu. You can have your crab any number of ways--I like ginger and green onion, but others include black bean sauce or salt and pepper.

I've also heard good things on this board about the crabs at Seven Stars Pepper (1201 S. Jackson, Ste 211) which specializes in Sichuan-style food. I haven't had the crab myself, but did share a killer hot-pot there with a group of e-gulleters.

These ID restaurants are very casual. I also second the recommendations above of Matt's in the Market.

Hope you enjoy your visit!

Jan

If you go to Cafe Campagne for brunch, have the Oeufs en Meurette (foie gras sauce). Really good.

Jan

Seattle, WA

"But there's tacos, Randy. You know how I feel about tacos. It's the only food shaped like a smile....A beef smile."

--Earl (Jason Lee), from "My Name is Earl", Episode: South of the Border Part Uno, Season 2

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I agree with the ID suggestions.  non-Chinese restaurants aren't the only ones with good crabs too.. I like the crab at Malay Satay Hut: http://malaysatayhut.com/.

Yes, and the giant prawns are also really good.

Jan

Jan

Seattle, WA

"But there's tacos, Randy. You know how I feel about tacos. It's the only food shaped like a smile....A beef smile."

--Earl (Jason Lee), from "My Name is Earl", Episode: South of the Border Part Uno, Season 2

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The restaurants have been covered by others, so here's my pitch: Be very sure to spend some time at the Pike Place Market. There's nothing like it!

“"When you wake up in the morning, Pooh," said Piglet at last, "what's the first thing you say to yourself?"

"What's for breakfast?" said Pooh. "What do you say, Piglet?"

"I say, I wonder what's going to happen exciting today?" said Piglet.

Pooh nodded thoughtfully.

"It's the same thing," he said.”

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  • 2 weeks later...

So thanks to all of you and your wonderful city, we had a wonderful trip.

Some food highlights:

1. Matt's in the Market - perfect. delicious. Great over the market setting.

2. Elliot's - Dungeness Dungeness Dungeness. Steamed w/ drawn butter. Perfect. Great oysters - absolutely fresh and that great briny creamy texture.

3. Salumi for lunch - not the best I've had, but the atmosphere is great.

4. Cascadia - 7 course "Pacific" menu - wife had the "From here" menu - It was OK. I wouldn't go back, but I'm glad that we tried it. Sad to say that my favorite item was the pine tree sorbet.

5. Cafe Campagne for lunch - OMG. The calamari we got for an app was ok, but the poached eggs w/ the sauce & frites - TO DIE FOR. Charming bistro setting as well.

6. Oyster Bar on Chuckanut Drive - the drive is great, but I'd skip the restaurant. Seemed very stuffy - food was average - and the namesake oysters were just OK.

7. Le Panier - pastries pastries pastries - I think we did half of our breakfasts by getting whatever looked good in the display case.

8. Piroshki sp? - can't go wrong w/ Potatoes, Onions, and Cheese for breakfast. The mushroom ones are good as well.

9. Takohachi - very good, completely unpretentious Japanese home cooking. Always comforting to remember that other cultures like deep fried chicken chunks too!

Lest all of you think that all we did was eat, we also enjoyed the following: Elliot Bay Books, Uwajimaya, Mt. Ranier, Chuckanut Drive, SAM (well, maybe not), Museum of Flight, SciFi@EMP. and not least of all, PP Market.

Great town even with the crappy weather last week!

BTW, could there possibly be more Starbucks? Only funny because I actually liked Tully's better :raz:

Thanks again!

Edited by vw8v (log)
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I like Takohachi too. Was just there last week in hopes of the nabe they always do during autumn and winter, but they said they don't start serving that until this week. Mmmmm chili nabe.... Mmmmm kimchi nabe...

I miss Koraku, near the old Uwajimaya building, though still enjoy Takohachi's take on grilled mackeral and salmon.

Pat

"I... like... FOOD!" -Red Valkyrie, Gauntlet Legends-

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vw8v, thanks for reporting back. It's always good for those of us who think we know what the flip we're talking about to get feedback from visitors. :wink:

Takohachi? Why don't I even know of this place?? Give it up the 411, someone!

Most women don't seem to know how much flour to use so it gets so thick you have to chop it off the plate with a knife and it tastes like wallpaper paste....Just why cream sauce is bitched up so often is an all-time mytery to me, because it's so easy to make and can be used as the basis for such a variety of really delicious food.

- Victor Bergeron, Trader Vic's Book of Food & Drink, 1946

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Takohachi is in the ID on Jackson between 6th Ave S. and 7th Ave. S. It's the sort of place one would find lots of homesick international students. They're open Tuesday - Saturday for lunch and dinner.

Another good place in that same vein is Fort St. George, one floor above the International Hobby and Toy shop in the ID. Though not such a good idea for people sensitive to smoke, it is a very smoky place with a bar area in it.

I like Maekawa Bar across from it as well, also on the same floor. Mmmmm takoyaki! This place is for drinking sake and eating a variety of carefully prepared Japanese dishes tapas style, with some full dinner options. 6pm - ?? every day.

If what you're after is a fine dining experience, Takohachi and Fort St. George won't fit the bill. They really are a particular style of Japanese casual fare/home cooking.

Pat

"I... like... FOOD!" -Red Valkyrie, Gauntlet Legends-

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4. Cascadia - 7 course "Pacific" menu - wife had the "From here" menu - It was OK. I wouldn't go back, but I'm glad that we tried it. Sad to say that my favorite item was the pine tree sorbet.

Sorry to read that Cascadia was disappointing for you as I'm sure I was one of those who strongly recommended it...

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Wow, another saba shioyaki lover...  Takohachi is my #1 saba shioyaki place now that Koraku is gone.

My husband had the saba shioyaki at Takohachi for the first time last week, and that's almost all he's talked about since! We've tried so many times to have a meal there, but their hours are so limited. I'm glad you had the skinny on that, Pat!

"Save Donald Duck and Fuck Wolfgang Puck."

-- State Senator John Burton, joking about

how the bill to ban production of foie gras in

California was summarized for signing by

Gov. Schwarzenegger.

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Wow, another saba shioyaki lover...  Takohachi is my #1 saba shioyaki place now that Koraku is gone.

I also love saba shioyaki and am going to have to get over to Takohachi to try it out. Any other places that do it well?

I've enjoyed a decent version at Toyoda in Lake City.

Jan

Jan

Seattle, WA

"But there's tacos, Randy. You know how I feel about tacos. It's the only food shaped like a smile....A beef smile."

--Earl (Jason Lee), from "My Name is Earl", Episode: South of the Border Part Uno, Season 2

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Ok, someone, please help me: what is saba shioyaki?  :unsure:

Saba is mackerel, and shioyaki means salt grilled. In other words, anything done shioyaki style is rubbed with salt, allowed to sit for a bit, then grilled for a crispy salted taste. Oily fish like mackerel and salmon are especially good that way because the oils add to the crunchy caramelization. It's one of those simple yet oh so good homey preparations, and they often come with a bunch of grated daikon and maybe a soy or ponzu-like dipping sauce as condiments.

One thing I miss about visits to Los Angeles were the Japanese breakfast places, where one could get sake (salmon) shioyaki for breakfast.

Pat

"I... like... FOOD!" -Red Valkyrie, Gauntlet Legends-

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  • 2 weeks later...
Takohachi is in the ID on Jackson between 6th Ave S. and 7th Ave. S. It's the sort of place one would find lots of homesick international students. They're open Tuesday - Saturday for lunch and dinner.

.....

My bad, Takohachi's hours are:

Lunch

Monday - Friday 11:30am - 1:30pm

Dinner

Monday - Saturday 5:30pm - 8:30pm

Pat

"I... like... FOOD!" -Red Valkyrie, Gauntlet Legends-

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