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Which Medieval or Renaissance Cookbook Are You?


Andrew Fenton
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"You are The English Housewife! As published by Gervaise Markham in 1615, you are a wide-ranging work describing the ideal virtues needed to run a country estate. Light on vegetables, heavy on meat and sugar."

This is one I have seen used, actually. M&R cookbooks are really fun, some of them.

Neat quiz, thanks.

"My tongue is smiling." - Abigail Trillin

Ruth Shulman

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"You are Platina's 1465 work De Honesta Voluptate (On Right Pleasure). You were substantially plagiarized from an earlier cookbook, but forge your own tone of philosphical humanism."

Hmmm. Me too. What an interesting quizz! All the different flavor combos that I just don't see in todays restaurants or on my own table, for that matter.

I'd like to see the glazed boar's head with a candle in his mouth! :smile:

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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You are Ouverture de Cuisine! Published in 1604 by Lancelot de Casteau, you have many interesting and tasty recipes. You might want to check your cholesterol level, though.

"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

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I tested out to be 'Fabulous Feasts':

"You don't know much about Medieval and Renaissance cooking but you probably don't care. You'd rather make up a recipe than do the research."

Funny...because this is the only Medieval cookbook on my shelves...and every time I try to read it, a deep sleep happens instead (which is my fault, surely, not the author's).

I really liked the question in the quiz that asked if you liked to 'cook a meat according to its humor'. :huh::laugh:

Edited by Carrot Top (log)
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You are the cookery-book known as Apicius! Roman recipes, probably put together in the late fourth to early fifth centuries. Yes, I know it predates the medieval era...

Oddly enough, that's the only one of the options that I actually have on my shelf.

Charlie

Walled Lake, Michigan

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I am

the fifteenth-century French cookery manuscript known as the Vivendier! Your recipes are less traditional than other collections of the time, and you contain some dishes found nowhere else.

Who comes up with these quizzes??? Too, too funny...

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You are the fourteenth-century recipe collection known as Curye on Inglysch! You like brown glop a great deal, and you possess a glossary that is the envy of many.

Brown glop? :raz::sad:

Ana the Librarian

Twins were born June 14th, 2006!!!!!

I'm also a Disney Trivia fan: DisneyTrivia

I trade books!

Have books to trade? Join PaperBack Swap!

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"You are Ouverture de Cuisine! Published in 1604 by Lancelot de Casteau, you have many interesting and tasty recipes. You might want to check your cholesterol level, though."

This was great quiz. Now, where is the number for my Doctor.......

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Another Apicius here.

Me too, but then 6 years of high school and college Latin will do that to a person.  :wacko:

I picked up a copy shortly after reading Petronius. I found myself dazzled, fascinated and not a little disturbed by the Cena Trimalchionis, and happened across Apicius in a rather unlikely place - a tiny farmers/flea market in southeast Ohio. Three bucks, but missing the dust jacket. Leafed through it and figured I could take a stab at some of the food. Still haven't gotten around to it.

Charlie

Walled Lake, Michigan

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You are Le Viandier, by Guillaume Tirel (or Taillevent). Written in the fourteenth century, you were the first commercially successful French cookbook.

How nice to know I was commercially successful somewhere :biggrin:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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You are the 1420 work Du fait de cuisine! Written by Master Chiquart for the Duke of Savoy (later Pope Felix V), you always make sure that your kitchen implements do not smell at all of garlic.

Boy, I hope my beloved spouse and kids appreciate this...

I didn't know there was a Pope Felix (let alone five of them)... somehow it just doesn't sound like a biblical name. And what's the deal with the garlic?

What's wrong with peanut butter and mustard? What else is a guy supposed to do when we are out of jelly?

-Dad

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I am<img src="http://images.quizilla.com/C/cookbook/1063659190_esviandier.jpg" border="0" alt="The Viandier of Taillevent"><br>You are Le Viandier, by Guillaume Tirel (or<br>Taillevent). Written in the fourteenth century,<br>you were the first commercially successful<br>French cookbook.

<br><br><a href="http://quizilla.com/users/cookbook/quizzes/Which%20Medieval%20or%20Renaissance%20cookbook%20are%20you%3F/"> <font size="-1">Which Medieval or Renaissance cookbook are you?</font></a><BR> <font size="-3">brought to you by <a href="http://quizilla.com">Quizilla</a></font>

They must be kidding, right?

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I'm "Fabulous Feasts" as well. From the description, I wonder if that's their catchall for people who don't fit very cleanly into one of the other books?

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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<img src="http://images.quizilla.com/C/cookbook/1063658853_resapicius.jpg" border="0" alt="Apicius: The Roman Cookery Book"><br>You are the cookery-book known as Apicius! Roman<br>recipes, probably put together in the late<br>fourth to early fifth centuries. Yes, I<br><B>know</B> it predates the medieval era...

<br><br><a href="http://quizilla.com/users/cookbook/quizzes/Which%20Medieval%20or%20Renaissance%20cookbook%20are%20you%3F/"> <font size="-1">Which Medieval or Renaissance cookbook are you?</font></a><BR> <font size="-3">brought to you by <a href="http://quizilla.com">Quizilla</a></font>

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Another result of Platina's 1465 work De Honesta Voluptate.

My mother has a Medieval cookbook, I think Fabulous Feasts [Edit: Confirmed by looking at the photo on the quiz site], if that's the one with a modern edition that has a bunch of information about how people lived, cooked, and ate in those days. A bunch of years ago, I remember her making a Medieval dinner for the family. It was excellent. I particularly remember the elderberry pie.

Edited by Pan (log)

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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