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Food Periodicals


jamiemaw
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Mr. Maw, color me embarrassed on your behalf, for you have omitted from your listing perhaps the finest food periodical on the planet -- and it's published right there in Vancouver:

Forks & Corks

Forks & Corks, published by the Greater Vancouver Convention and Visitors Bureau, arrives in my mailbox quarterly. I spend three months waiting -- nay, pining -- for Forks & Corks, and when it arrives I drop everything else and read every word. If anybody calls me during those four minutes, I don't answer the phone. I don't use the lavatory. I don't even make love to my wife -- my wife! -- during that time. It would be unthinkable.

Thank you for listening.

You are far too kind, Stephen.

from the thinly veneered desk of:

Jamie Maw

Food Editor

Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com

Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

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As an odd aside, I'd go for the writings of Robert Halliday who wrote under the name of Ung-aang Talaay for years with the Bangkok Post. He's always been a great source for winkling out those corners of Thailand's food culture that are slowly getting pushed aside by the big food chains.

I'd hope, at some point, there'll be a compilation of his work culled from the Post. I should've done more clipping when I was young.

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Colour ME embarrassed, I didn't even know that pub. existed....now I need to seek it out.

I'm embarrassed, for Vancouver, just reading this. Is this the best that Tourism Vancouver can come up with? :blink:

Dining in Vancouver

Hungry? What tempts your taste buds: Decadent desserts - grilled T-bone steak - Fresh seafood - Soy Burger? Vancouver has every taste and type of food you crave!

"If cookin' with tabasco makes me white trash, I don't wanna be recycled."

courtesy of jsolomon

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I stand by Cook's illustrated, as well, as a professional cook. The dishes are simple, but I like reading about the trial and error process - lots of useful information in their failures.

I have to disagree with Victoria's EAT, being 'tightly edited.' A great resource, that's come a long way in a short time, tightly edited it is not.

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I have been on the move the last few years- traveling light but always reading three or four food magazines, on the continuous search for new ones. I started out in Port Alberni (van island) for two years, then I was on the road across great BC and the Nelson around almost a year then off to Alberta oil- working up north making some real money at Nor Alta lodge in Slave lake Alberta. I dragged these magazines around with me and at the end they started to have their own suitcase.

Here is the top ten list of my favs out of the collection I dragged around Western Canada.

1) Saveur US

2) Waitrose Food Ilustrated England

3) Delicious Australia

4) Gastronomica US

4) Wine Spectator US

5) Food Arts US

6) Gourmet US

7) Food and Wine US

8) Culinary trends US

9) Burnt Toast (CND)- Ottawa

Cook To Live; Live To Cook
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Hello Foodie,

Heartily concur about Dottie and John in the weekend WSJ--they've taken some brave steps to demystify wine as opposed to say, the vestigial and often innacurate writing found in The Whine Dictator.

One other writer whom I think you would enjoy (and who's been even more overt in taking the mickey out of the wine industry) is Lawrence Osborne in his book The Accidental Connoisseur. It has especially hilarious chapters on Robert Mondavi and Leo McLoskey, the founder of Enologix, who purports to be able to 'design' wine for vintners to order to qualify them for a Parker 92. Very good stuff.

What makes it especially appealing is Osborne's self-deprecation (to the point of painting himself as the oenophilic equivalent of a stumblebum) when, in fact, he's clearly anything but. Between the lines, he gently instructs that irony really does require two audiences and is not quite as simple as a black fly in your chardonnay, as Alanis once had us believe. It should be required reading for any would-be whinie.

Although I thought The Fourth Star was based on an interesting premise, I thought it went on a bit too long. I thought that some of the dynamic tension she built up about the pressure and stress of a NYT four star-rated kitchen such as Restaurant Daniel foundered later in the book. Do you agree?

She certainly did capture the idiocy of that arseholed maitre d' who was particularly adept at castigating/humiliating the tourists during first (pre-theatre) seating. One of our favourite sports used to sitting in the bar at Daniel after work and watching him do precisely that while extracting fifties for an inferior table on the side of the corral.

But, in what I think could only be described as very lazy reporting, I thought she got Thomas Haas completely wrong, painting him to be some sort of malevolent demi-monster. As anyone who knows Thomas (who even under pressure I've found to be pretty patient, even gracious) realizes, he's far from it. But maybe that attitudinal difference is one reason he moved back here to raise his family.

You're absolutely right about how she wrote about the customers--those Type A's who only had kids so they could get pre-boarding.

Foodie, last time I looked Barbara-jo had some copies of The Accidental Connoisseur--I think it's right up your alley. And for anyone out there who hasn't had the pleasure of reading Calvin Trillin, the collection called The Tummy Trilogy (which includes his classic Alice, Let's Eat) is also available there.

Thanks again for your generous contribution to La Grand Bouffe.

Enjoy.

Jamie

Dottie and John have taken "brave" steps to demystify wine???

I must admit that I find their column geared to a sort of lowest common denominator--sort of a "dummies" level approach. It is fine for what it is.

FYI--the couples writing to "demystify wine" schtick is quite old. Elin McCoy and John Frederick Walker pioneered it back in the eighties in their column in Food and Wine. (there may be another earlier couple but I am unaware of them). They also IMOP did a much better job with much more style in their writing than John and Dottie who sometimes engage in a too precious baby talk kind of cooing about wine. (they sometimes sound like Stuart Smalley).

I recommend "Thinking About Wine" by McCoy and Walker (it may be out of print).

Bravery is hardly an attribute I would apply to what John and Dottie are engaged in.

I am curious as to what the "Whine Dictator" is and your choice of "vestigial" and "inaccurate" to describe the writing in that publication. Maybe it is just me, but vestigial seems an odd descriptor

hence my curiosity.

As for "The Accidental Connoisseur" I agree. This is a brilliant and wonderfully written book. Osborne is a gifted writer (by the way he has a new book just out "The Naked Tourist").

interestingly he is not really demystifying wine--he is actually celebrating the mystery of wine.

I would add (in agreement with another poster below--or above) that "The Art of Eating" Ed Behr's quarterly publication is a must read for anyone serious about food and drink and travel etc.

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FYI

Whine Dictator = Wine Spectator

Read it BELIEVE IT!

I have always thought that the Wine Spectator was quite well executed.

Good interesting features, the columnists are often thought provoking and the

tasting notes and recommendations are ok as well.

Really, what's the problem with the publication?

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Edward Behr's - Art of Eating. Ridiculously researched and always an engaging content rich read cover to cover. Introduces you to things that you never thought you were interested in. I wait every quarter for the new issue.

I've lent my back issues to a friend - fingers will chopped for every lost or damaged page....

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My current hands-down favorite is "Art of Eating" by Edward Behr.  Check their website at: Art of Eating

Published quarterly, there is usually one main article, one or two secondary articles and some book reviews.  The main article usually bores down on one topic in quite a lot od detail.  I remember on the state of veal in the US, and another on pork.  The writing is calm and matter-of-fact (kind of the opposite of A. Boudain).  Many are written by Mr. Behr, but he has a number of other contributors.  No advertising.

I also enjoy "Simple Cooking" by John and Matt Thorne. 

I can't bear the Kimball fellow on his "America's Test Ktichen," so I don't think I'm likely to ever give Cook's Illustrated a chance.

edited to delete unintended quotation

Can I purchase the "Art of Eating" at a store or must I order via mail? If I can buy it in town, where in Vancouver can I find this magazine?

Thanks.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm a huge fan of the newly revamped CityFood Online. Though the current site is only a beta version -- Rhonda May's article on the new format is here -- it's very well laid out. Clear, easy-to-navigate interface, fantastic graphics.

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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PamR - any background on this?  Looks like you can order cakes through 'Anna'.

No. :laugh:

The site doesn't give you much info. either. I'm going to try to get to McNAlly to check it out.

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It seems to be the season for Vancouver food-related web-sites to be updated.  VanEats is looking for ideas.

And Adam's Fabulous Vancouver Dining Guide will close on December 31, 2006, but you may buy or lease it.

Adam's Guide will be a big loss. The site format needs updating, but there's an amazing amount of information in it ... although I could do without his rants on Tapas and Paella :raz: Anyone want to talk me into investing? Or maybe UrbanDiner can incorprate it.

A.

ps - 3000th post. I need a life.

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Impressive just under 3 posts a day average.

It seems to be the season for Vancouver food-related web-sites to be updated.  VanEats is looking for ideas.

And Adam's Fabulous Vancouver Dining Guide will close on December 31, 2006, but you may buy or lease it.

Adam's Guide will be a big loss. The site format needs updating, but there's an amazing amount of information in it ... although I could do without his rants on Tapas and Paella :raz: Anyone want to talk me into investing? Or maybe UrbanDiner can incorprate it.

A.

ps - 3000th post. I need a life.

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Another local website I like is In the Kitchen. The recent story on Eating Global Vancouver was pretty interesting:

Under the guidance of Dr. Henry Yu, the INSTRCC team - (Initiative for Student Teaching and Research in Chinese Canadian Studies) set out to study contemporary and historical Chinese Canadian migration and how this migration has changed Vancouver. Their angle - food. I interviewed Andrew Dhillon from the Eating Global Vancouver team, and he told me how they sought migrants here in Vancouver so they could tell their stories before they were lost. They interviewed Peter Chang from Green Lettuce, a local Indian/Chinese fusion restaurant on 1949 Kingsway and made a short film.

Cheers,

Anne

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  • 1 month later...

This is my first attempt at posting here. I'm hoping somebody might help.

I received a magazine in the mail several weeks ago. I don't recall requesting it, but it talked about a lot of new food products that won various awards from shows around the country. It wasn't a catalog, they weren't selling anything. It seemed to be the first issue, and had a website for you to log onto, to receive a "free subscription". I'd subscribe to this, and pay for it, from what I could tell from the sample issue. Apparently, my wife recycled the magazine. And for the life of me, I can't recall what it was called.

Ring a bell for anyone? Thanks for any help.

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This is my first attempt at posting here.  I'm hoping somebody might help.

I received a magazine in the mail several weeks ago.  I don't recall requesting it, but it talked about a lot of new food products that won various awards from shows around the country.  It wasn't a catalog, they weren't selling anything.  It seemed to be the first issue, and had a website for you to log onto, to receive a "free subscription".  I'd subscribe to this, and pay for it, from what I could tell from the sample issue.  Apparently, my wife recycled the magazine.  And for the life of me, I can't recall what it was called.

Ring a bell for anyone?  Thanks for any help.

Doesn't ring a bell to me, but new pubs open and close like sea anemones. Scott, what is your line of business, and where is your mailing address located? I might be able to help narrow the field for you. E.g., certain pubs target the restaurant trade industry and have a dedicated mail list . . . ..

Laura Fauman

Vancouver Magazine

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