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phaelon56

The Pecan Pie Topic

112 posts in this topic

Okay, it is FINALLY in the oven.

I settled on a hybrid recipe based on the brown butter one on pg 1 of this thread.

but since I was concerned my brown sugar was a bit hard and dry and couldn't get together 2 cups to pack, I added some Lyles (maybe 2oz)) and a bit more tha a TB of molasses.

Well the brown sugar melted well although a good deal of the butter stayed separate , I tempered the eggs using that butter,and they combined smoothly.

As someone suggested I used a combo of vanilla AND bourbon. :wink:

In the meantime I ruined one Dufour's pate brisse crust- It shrank and the bottom made a disk while the sides came apart as a cylinder. :shock: I followed their directions to the letter and it came out very shrunken and uneven....so - I decided to do a shorter (6 minutes) par bake on my extra crust and at first when i took it out, it started to stick to the top layer of pie pan (they come sandwiched between two foil pans which you keep on it to parbake) Then I realized the crust is 8" and the recipe- and the pie crust shield I have are for 9" pies.

So I eyeballed it, filled it to within 3/8- 1/2" of the edge of the pie pan, and used a safety pin to shorten the silicone shield Whew! And I'm guessing 1/2 hour in stead of 40 min now....

Now I'm going to use the discarded bits of crust #1 layered with leftover filling and nuts and make a few in pyrex ramekins. I will mix in a few walnuts as someone else upthread suggested, and see how that goes. I figure, I have to do something with this filling.

My first pie should be out of the oven in about 15 minutes, and it's smelling very good already!

I will try and get some pics to post for you all.

Thanks so much for all the ideas!


Edited by butterscotch (log)

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Mine is just cooling now, but I believe I can answer you this- I parbaked just 6-7 minutes- just enough to dry out the dough, not give it any color, and it's burnt after just a half hour. I think this filling gets super extra hot, maybe it's the sugar in the crust too?

The pie itself looks great, and I was thinking, like you, and the directions from Dufours that I could parbake just a little bit, , but this crust is burnt. Burnt butter crust and burnt butter pecan pie. At least it's thematic. :shrug:

For those who have tried making this pie: Any reason not to use a pie crust that has been partially baked before filling? I almost never make a pie that doesn't have the crust at least partially blind baked before filling. I assume that would be fine here, but thought I'd inquire of those who have already baked this pie.

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And pecan season is upon us once again! Got to start it off right, and that means pecan pie... this week I used the recipe from Rose Levy Beranbaum's The Pie and Pastry Bible. Her secrets, as mentioned above, are using Lyle's Golden Syrup instead of corn syrup, and using unrefined brown sugar (I used a dark Muscavado) in place of regular brown sugar. I amuse myself by arranging the pecans in concentric circles on the crust (the Cook's Illustrated Vodka Crust, in this case):

gallery_56799_5925_3374.jpg

The other reason I like this recipe is the ratio of pecans to filling is high because it's really more of a tart than a pie. Here's what's left by the time I remembered to take a photo:

gallery_56799_5925_29624.jpg


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Here's mine:

Southern Bourbon-Pecan Pie

Put 1T of molasses and/or 2T of maple syrup into measuring cup

Add dark Karo Syrup (or Blue Ribbon Cane) to make 1 Cup

1/2 C white sugar

1/2 C dark brown sugar

1/3 C melted butter

3 T bourbon (or 2 t vanilla if you don't like bourbon)

4 eggs, beaten until mixed but not frothy

1 1/2 C pecan pieces

Combine syrups and sugars and mix well. Add butter and bourbon. Stir in eggs and combine well.

In bottom of pie shell scatter pecan pieces. Pour pie filling over. Bake 350º for 35-45 minutes. Pie is done when center no longer ripples in middle when moved. Cool well before serving.

This makes enough for a big pie (10"). If I haven't made a shell that large, I just pour the leftover filling into a smaller pan and bake one sans crust.

Pecan Pie season is almost upon us once again.

I was asked for my recipe. Here it is.

And, I'm wondering if anyone has tried a chocolate pecan pie?

I love chocolate and I love pecans and I'm wondering how they would do together in a pie.

1 person likes this

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I make a very similar Pecan pie. I use Rum. re: chocolate: I sometimes add semi-sweet chocolate chips.

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I make a very similar Pecan pie. I use Rum. re: chocolate: I sometimes add semi-sweet chocolate chips.

How many? And when?

And do you make any other adjustments in the ingredients?


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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about 1/2 cup. in the 'mix' no other adjustment. just make sure the total volume does not exceed the volume of the pie shell.

the chocolate chips melt.

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I've never had an authentic American pecan pie, so I'm not sure exactly what's expected, but I can say that I made this last year and it was very very tasty. From memory I didn't include the chocolate chunks, but they would have been a welcome addition.

(it's also corn-syrup-free which wasn't a concern for me but could be handy for folks avoiding it :))

http://www.chefeddy.com/2012/11/port-chocolate-pecan-tart/

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The chocolate addition, as tasty as that is might detract from the Pure Pecan Ness of the pie.

Try the Pure from high end carefully toasted pecans ( fresh Pecans Please @! ) first.

there are so many pies from this start ..............

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The chocolate addition, as tasty as that is might detract from the Pure Pecan Ness of the pie.

Try the Pure from high end carefully toasted pecans ( fresh Pecans Please @! ) first.

there are so many pies from this start ..............

Right. A chocolate-pecan pie isn't really the place to start. I'm considering trying a chocolate-pecan pie this year, in addition to the regular pecan pie, and as a variation - a change of pace.

But it just ain't a celebration in the South without a Traditional Pecan Pie.

I've never had an authentic American pecan pie, so I'm not sure exactly what's expected, but I can say that I made this last year and it was very very tasty. From memory I didn't include the chocolate chunks, but they would have been a welcome addition.

(it's also corn-syrup-free which wasn't a concern for me but could be handy for folks avoiding it :))

http://www.chefeddy.com/2012/11/port-chocolate-pecan-tart/

Regarding the "corn-syrup-free" thing...

Pecan pies traditionally call for regular ol' corn syrup; NOT the high-fructose corn syrup (a commercial product) that is the current bugaboo. In fact, I find it very odd that the recipe to which you linked, although clearly aimed at the home cook, mentions leaving out "high-fructose corn syrup," which, I personally, have never seen a home cook use. And I cannot imagine a recipe for a homemade pecan pie that would call for 1 cup high-fructose corn syrup. That makes me suspicious that (in this one instance, anyway) Eddy didn't know what he was talking about.

And, although I think Blue Ribbon or Steen's Cane Syrup is preferable, it's still all sugar.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I am wanting to make a honey pecan pie, and I have found a view different recipes. They all seem very similar, but some call for cooking the honey before adding the eggs and other ingredients and others just use the honey with no cooking. Does anyone know which would be better? Also, I was interested in adding the cranberries, as mentioned previously on this thread, and was wondering what would be a good ratio of Pecans to cranberries?

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Hey Jeannecake , great to know about your personal favorite recipe and yeah i had tried this recipe by your's method and really it works very well for me. Keep on sharing some others also.

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