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jhlurie

Confessions of a Novelty Confection Fiend

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jhlurie and i are in a dead-heat for the Best Web Surfer award.  this award is of course historically given out to geeks and nerds.

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Of course, inevitably, this thread was hijacked from the original subject about addiction to new confections.  But if we are going to talk about nostalgic candy, I suppose I can dig even deeper into the niche than Goldenberg's, Marathon, and Spree.  How 'bout a candy so rare it's only available in one city?

When I was visiting Kansas City I had (and loved) Valomilk cups.

See the Valomilk Website (click here) for the whole Valomilk story.  Apparently it used to be very popular throughout the whole midwest, but is now limited to K.C.  If I'd known that when I was out there I would have bought a whole case...

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If I'm not mistaken on the name, I believe that the Mr. Big bar is the one I learned about while working at Hershey Foods for two summers.

Know what goes into that bar?  Whatever is left over.  They just dump all the ingredients left over from producing the other candies for that day, add some cherry syrup (to taste, by a few workers that apparently "know" what it should taste like), and make a chocolate bar out of it.  For what I was told the label even says "May contain:" before all of the ingredients.

Tasty, eh?

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speaking of candy & Brits...

a mention of Gravity's Rainbow on an earlier literary thread made me think about the section where Slothrop is eating bizarre English hard candies with the ditty aunt of one of his sexual conquests...great descriptions of whacky flavors, like rhubarb filled with cubeb, and commentary on Brit palates.

Jim

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Here are some new odd confections I've found...

Honees - I just can't get enough of these... they are basically high quality honey in a candy shell.  Varieties include Basic Honey-filled, Honey/Menthol/Eucalyptus and Milk-N-Honees.

honeeslogo1.jpg

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Another new one--although for a change I can't find a picture on the web of it--is a new product from Brachs.  Chocolate and White Fudge Covered Caramel Corn.  Three or Four of these have the fat/calorie equivalent of... geez.  I don't know.  It's a lot.  The Fudge is really thick, not just a dusting like you get with some Fudge covered Pretzels.

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I'm trying to remember what these things were: baseball bats made of taffy? I think I had them at summer camp in the 70s. Something on a stick, with baseball language. I need help.

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Last week I found a new candy to die for.  It's called Pocky and it's a Japanese candy that is starting to do well in the States.  It's basically a long pretzel that is dipped in coatings.  Here's a lineup:

Th_c051.jpg

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But my favorite is Pocky for Men:

Th_c029.jpg

I have NO idea why they apply a gender to the chocolate Pocky, but they did.  I am not aware of Pocky for Women.

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Hey Liza, I think I remember something like that. Were they called B-Bats? And did they come in many colors, I mean flavors?  :)

I ate a lot of Fun Dip in the late 70s-early 80s.

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I like mini lychee jelly cups. The cups are each about 1/2 the size of one's pinky, are made of plastic, and are peeled open like single serving cream containers. Then, there is a bit of light syrup that allows the capsule of jelly (with a piece of lychee suspended inside) glide into one's mouth. They're usually found in Chinatown, and also come in flavors like green apple, mango etc. I like them refridgerated.

http://www.crackseed.com/category/candy/ly...jelly_cups.html (not depicting the better brand)

http://www.safetyalerts.com/recall/f/02/f0000162.htm

(FDA indicated candies should not be offered to children and the elderly, due to choking risks)

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That's it! I remember banana flavor. Fun dip - was that a stick of sugar used to scoop up more sugar? No wonder we loved playing running bases.

I think we should start a camp food thread somewhere.  . .

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Yeah, with Fun Dip you got a hard sugar stick and one, two, or three packets of colored sugar with citric acid or some such to make it tart. I ate mostly one-packet Fun Dips because that's what they sold at the snack bar by the pool where I swam as a kid. The three-packet ones came with TWO sugar sticks! Then they started making "color changing" sugars that were pink until they came in contact with liquid (ie, your saliva) when they turned blue.

Once I reminisced about Fun Dip to my partner Erin, and he confessed he'd loved it as a kid too. A week or so later I went into one of those Sweet Factory stores on a whim and lo and behold, they sold three-packet Fun Dip! I bought two of them and brought them home. Erin ripped into his and immediately declared it the most disgusting thing he'd put in his mouth in years (and I don't mean gleefully disgusting, I mean disgusting disgusting). I couldn't even bring myself to taste mine after hearing that. Wah.

Candy is the campiest of campy food. I mean it's the most overwhelmingly campy category of food. Even campier than Velveeta.

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Oh I meant camp as in summer camp! I went to a Quaker camp in the Pinebarrens of NJ so I might have had weird summer camp food.

Bug juice, anyone?

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Last week I found a new candy to die for.  It's called Pocky

Th_c005.jpg

I've seen this one in New York.  Is pink a gender identifying color in Japan?  If so, maybe the strawberry Pocky is "for women", whatever that means.

Or not.

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I like mini lychee jelly cups

I'm shocked, shocked!  I shall have to reconsider everything you've ever said about food. :biggrin:

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Sandra -- Reconsider, as in giving me brownie points for liking lychee jelly cups? :wink:

When I next go shopping for food in Chinatown, I am going to bring a wheelie "cabin luggage"-type bag (a less sophisticated version of the Perlows' cart for the sausages). I am going to stock up on all sorts of things.

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Well, it certainly brings you down to earth. :raz:  I've always thought your tastes were more, shall we say...elevated.  Not that there's anything wrong with lychee jelly cups. :smile:

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Sandra -- I've mentioned that I like Campbell's soup and Lean Cuisine (esp. sphaghetti with meatballs, for some reason, although I try to add some spicing to it) too.  :wink:  I often eat at my employer's cafeteria (which is alright as far as cafeterias go), and just ate Chicken McNuggets (hot mustard sauce, or mild mustard as they might call it in the UK) with piping hot fries today. Then, for dinner, I had delivery of some alright tempura prawns. :wink:

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Pocky is fabulous. Keep your eye out for "tea" flavored Pocky -- chocolate and Earl Grey! And then there's "Man" Pocky -- begging the question, for? or tastes like?

There's a French book titled Les Bonbecs written by my friend Alexandre Reverend that artfully depicts a fabulous collection of Euro and Amero candy including "Les Gelatines," "Les Caramels," "Le Gadgets," "Les Poudres," and other fun categories.

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Last week I found a new candy to die for.  It's called Pocky and it's a Japanese candy that is starting to do well in the States.  It's basically a long pretzel that is dipped in coatings.  Here's a lineup:

Th_c029.jpg

Are you kidding?Look at this package...pull this out of your pocky,and it's bound to impress....

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No chocky bars, steak.

Really.

I slice it sashimi thin and usually wind up with 4 or 6 slicesleft in foil in the fridge. Starving? Couple of slices of steak, dab of wasabi or horseradish or Dijon.

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jin...you steak freak! :raz:

sometimes you need chocolate but dont have any Jean Georges Flourless Vahlrona Molten Chocolate Cakes around w an Almond Tuile...then whaddya gonna do?!? its Whatchamacallit Time!

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No. I'm a female with no chocolate gene at all. And concentrated sugar disgusts me. A dry wine or sake is sweet enough. More than that and feh.

But, really. Steak slices to go go go.

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