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Food gifts from Seattle


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I tried to do a search on coffe beans but for some reason I did not turn up anything. Since I now live here in the city known for great coffee....tell me where I can get the freshest beans just out of the roaster..

DO you have a favorite place? a favorite blend?

I would love to find a person that will sell me the beans RIGHT out of the roaster.

Where do you suggest?

Thanks for your help.

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Vita Blend at Espresso Vivace on Capitol Hill is extremely hard to beat.

I thought I knew what good coffee was before I visited Vivace, but these guys take it to a higher level. They have perfected both the art and science of espresso like nobody else I know.

Be warned: if you don't know where Vivace is, you can walk right past it and not even know it. It's on Denny, half a block east of Broadway. Look for the handicapped access ramp across the street from Jack in the Box, and you've found it.

Chief Scientist / Amateur Cook

MadVal, Seattle, WA

Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code

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If you truly want the freshest coffee right out of the roaster, learn to roast your own. It is simple and much cheaper compared to buying roasted beans.

For a good source of info on the subject, check out Sweet Marias or Coffeegeek in the home roasting forum.

Edited by MGLloyd (log)

Regards,

Michael Lloyd

Mill Creek, Washington USA

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Vivace is excellent. Also, Cafe Zoka, in Greenlake, roasts some good stuff on site and Heinz Public Market on Eastlake is excellent. Victrola, in 15th, is now starting to roast their own beans on premesis as well. Any of these will likely be better than Vita.

Bacon starts its life inside a piglet-shaped cocoon, in which it receives all the nutrients it needs to grow healthy and tasty.

-baconwhores.com

Bacon, the Food of Joy....

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vengroff, is Vita's stuff any good for drip coffee or only espresso? I think my dad tried one of their blends in his drip coffeemaker and was disappointed.

I've never tried it as anything but espresso. I think David would likely disavow himself from the results of drip brewing it, as it is specifically optimized for espresso use.

Chief Scientist / Amateur Cook

MadVal, Seattle, WA

Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code

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If you're interested in organic and shade grown coffee, I highly recommend Cafe Maree. It's in Green Lake--near the corner of Latona and Woodlawn. It's a small cafe with a funky space. Great coffee and people.

--braincell

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I know it's not particularly politically correct, but at home I've been brewing a custom Starbucks blend (three-quarters Sumatra, one-quarter Italian) for years. I grind my own beans and always come back to this blend, even after straying to try others. If you like a bold, rich coffee you might try this sometime. Starbucks doesn't sell it under any name; you have to ask for a custom blend and then give them the proportions. Make sure they mix the beans well. The cost is slightly over $10 for a pound. You can get it ground, but whole bean is the way to go, grinding right before you brew, for the freshest, tastiest cup.

Sacred cows make the best hamburger.

- Mark Twain, 1835 - 1910

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This is slightly off the topic but associated with it. Can anyone recommend a good coffee grinder. I use a French press for morning coffee and find that my old grinder (a Krupp's) does not do a uniform grind. It's not a bur grinder, it's the kind of grinder that looks like a miniature blender. The coffee ends up either to fine or to fine and to course combined. This produces a lot of sediment in the French press.

Fred Rowe

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OTB, I know you're in my neck of the woods, so I thought I'd pipe in with a very decent Pierce County coffee roaster. They're Martin Henry coffee and are well known in the South Sound region for their quality beans. I very infrequently drink anything caffeinated anymore (I'm a wuss), but when I was a coffee drinker, Martin Henry always hit the spot. They sell organic/shade-grown coffees and feature a decent selection of unique blends.

Their major store is actually in Puyallup, on River Road, which is about 3-4 minutes off of I-5. Quick directions: From Gig Harbor, Take 16 East across the bridge and get onto I-5 heading North. Right after the Tacoma Dome, you'll see the "Puyallup/SR 167" exit on your right, take that exit. The exit will curve sharply and you'll want to stay to your left and veer to the left through the light at the curve. Follow for about 1 mile. Martin Henry will be on your right at 1114 River Road. Their number: 253-848-3110.

Other Pierce County food trivia: Powerhouse Brewery in Puyallup serves a "Roated Porter" made with Martin Henry espresso. Divine with a sinful chocolate dessert.

edit: typo queen

Edited by girl chow (log)

A palate, like a mind, works better with exposure and education and is a product of its environment.

-- Frank Bruni

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This is slightly off the topic but associated with it. Can anyone recommend a good coffee grinder. I use a French press for morning coffee and find that my old grinder (a Krupp's) does not do a uniform grind. It's not a bur grinder, it's the kind of grinder that looks like a miniature blender. The coffee ends up either to fine or to fine and to course combined. This produces a lot of sediment in the French press.

FWED, I would highly recommend getting a burr grinder as opposed to a blade grinder. Blade grinders “smash” the beans with a blade at very high speed. The ground coffee has larger and smaller particles and is warmer than ground coffee from burr grinders. Blade grinders create “coffee dust” which can clog up sieves in espresso machines and French presses. Burr grinders produce a more uniform, consistent grind and can be set for the kind of grind desired.

I have a Capresso coffeemaker and a Capresso burr grinder (www.capresso.com) which I like very much.

Sacred cows make the best hamburger.

- Mark Twain, 1835 - 1910

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I know it's not particularly politically correct, but at home I've been brewing a custom Starbucks blend.

Starbucks is fine if you like bitter, overroasted beans. I detest their coffee.

You know, I hesitated before I posted this, thinking I might attract some negative comments. You might consider re-wording your responses in a less offensive and/or more positive way. Why not just say you personally find Starbucks coffees bitter and overroasted rather than intimating that there is something wrong with people who prefer a bolder roast like Starbucks. I might not like the coffee you prefer, but I wouldn't attack you or your taste just because you prefer it. As the French say, "Chacun a son gout."

Sacred cows make the best hamburger.

- Mark Twain, 1835 - 1910

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  • 2 months later...

I'm in town for a couple of days, and so far I have ordered a lemon tart from Macrina and am hoping to find a loaf of that corn bread and some macaroons at Dahlia tomorrow (September 1st, but perhaps I'll get lucky). I'm also thinking of bringing back some olive oil (Chefshop maybe? Has anyone been? I order online from them all the time but have never visited the retail store) and cruising Pike's Place tomorrow for, I don't know, more delicious stuff.

Any suggestions? I am open to everything.

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There's a stand in the market - I think it's chukacherries or something along that line. Anyway, they sell all sorts of covered, dried cherries - suffice to say that the chocolate covered cherries I bought didn't survive the trip home!

I also brought home a number of canned salmons and sturgeons - the first one I opened was surprisingly good.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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Yes, Chukar Cherries; they have other dried fruits too, nicely packaged. Isn't the classic Seattle souvenir smoked salmon in the wooden box? You could also buy some Starbucks coffee from the original Starbucks (no different from Starbucks in Hong Kong, but it's a souvenir). I haven't been to Chefshop in its present location. There's a shop in Pike Place that specializes in olive oil. What about some cheese from Beecher's (their own or another Washington State cheese)?

Hungry Monkey May 2009
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Isn't the classic Seattle souvenir smoked salmon in the wooden box?

Don't know about the wooden box part, but I think that smoked salmon always makes a great gift. My current favorite is the dry smoked version sold at Pure Food Fish in the Market. In a pinch, Portlock isn't bad either.

What about Market Spice tea?

Most women don't seem to know how much flour to use so it gets so thick you have to chop it off the plate with a knife and it tastes like wallpaper paste....Just why cream sauce is bitched up so often is an all-time mytery to me, because it's so easy to make and can be used as the basis for such a variety of really delicious food.

- Victor Bergeron, Trader Vic's Book of Food & Drink, 1946

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I'm also thinking of bringing back some olive oil (Chefshop maybe? Has anyone been? I order online from them all the time but have never visited the retail store) and cruising Pike's Place tomorrow for, I don't know, more delicious stuff.

It's fun to be able to taste the oils at ChefShop. You can also do some tasting at Oliver & Co at Pacific Place Mall (6th & Pine). And, I think, at The Spanish Table on Western. There's the truffle shop and another flavored olive oil shop on the east side of Pike Place near Stewart St.

The one thing I'd seek out would be smoked black cod! Decadence! I don't know if there's a particular season for its availablity, but I don't often see it. But when I do, I buy some! I like Jensen's Smokehouse. I've also had some from Uwajimaya (which should not be missed) that I liked.

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Maybe some coffee from Vivace on Broadway or another small roaster that is unique to Seattle. Or maybe some Washington State wine.

"Homer, he's out of control. He gave me a bad review. So my friend put a horse head on the bed. He ate the head and gave it a bad review! True Story." Luigi, The Simpsons

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Fran's chocolate filled and dipped figs.

A bottle of rain? (Hope you are enjoying this!)

Is there a story behind the Sept. 1 / lucky comment?

The summer corn bread at Dahlia was bread of the month in August.

However, I stopped by this morning and found out that they are extending it until the end of September.

Thanks for all the wonderful suggestions everyone. I'm heading out to start food hunting now.

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