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Matthew Grant

Restaurants in Prague

124 posts in this topic

Received an email informing me that KampaPark has reopened. They specialize in seafood and is located on Kampa Island and the river's edge. They were of course closed due to the floods.

http://www.kampapark.com/

Also - I have additonal posts to my trip to Prague that I've debated posting because it's really not food related but would defintely enhance your visit to Prague.

I had read that the views from Letna Park - across the Vltava from the Jewish Quarter - are superlative - they were right. From the plateau overlooking the city you can see all the bridges spanning the Vltava - the view is a must do. There is a restaurant located in the park - Hanavsky Pavilion - “a impressive structure in luxuriant Dutch pseudo-Baroque style , all made of cast iron complemented with masonry” . The food was nothing special. I would recommend getting a table outside, weather permitting, ordering a bottle of moravian white and just sit for a few hours. The longer I sat the more I began to see that Prague really is the city of 100 spires. The sunlight streamed across the rooftops casting the city into high contrast - the wide expanse of the sky and the rolling clouds - the silvery green of the Vltava - trams and people crossing the bridges. The second movement form Dvorak’s New World Symphony kept coming to mind. Occasionally other tourists would appear but overall I had this incredible vantage point to myself to enjoy. I was able to pin point various buildings the longer I sat. It was definitely one of the highlights of my trip. The restaurant also serves dinner.

http://www.hanavskypavilon.cz/Indexa.htm

Had reserved a space for the tour of the Municipal House one morning. Be sure to reserve in advance - spaces are limited. If you love art nouveau architecture - take this tour. The only way you’ll be able to see the galleries upstairs is by taking the tour. The tour also includes the concert hall - which you can also see during a performance. Each gallery is unique. It cost about $40 million to restore the Municipal House. Beautiful interiors. The tour lasted for about an hour. Be sure to check out the various rooms in the basement also.

Decided to have lunch at the Pilsen restaurant one day - which is located in the basement. The Pilsen restaurant was originally named “Folk Restaurant” - it’s a large brasserie with folk type motifs from the Slavonic countryside - dark blue green tiles, dark woods, ceramic pictures - definitely more peasant tone. Lunch: potato soup with wild mushrooms; prague ham with horseradish, mustard and pickled gerkins; piquant sausage from Davle with mustard and apple horseradish; assorted czech cheeses and a large glass of Pilsner (the only time I drank beer while in Prague). It was a simple, nice, moderately priced meal.

http://www.obecnidum.cz/e_index.htm

One afternoon I had reservations to tour the Mullerova Villa. If you’re an architecture buff - this is a must do.The house was designed by Adolf Loos. You must make a reservation to take a tour - group size is limited to 7. Tour cost 400 Kn. To make reservations: vila.muller@muzeum.

http://www.mullerovavila.cz/default-cv.html

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One simple restaurant, reeking in literary history, has survived from the days when eating at a Prague restaurant was like reading a book from George W's library. It's called U Kalicha, and it was the hangout of the writer/artist team responsible for The Good Soldier Schweik. Its website tells you all you need to know. It's simple and hearty, like a Munich beerhall. http://www.ukalicha.cz/english.html


John Whiting, London

Whitings Writings

Top Google/MSN hit for Paris Bistros

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Just a head ups - the Black Rooster is in the process of moving into central Prague and will hopefully be open by the end of August. They serve great contemporary Czech cuisine.

http://www.cernykohout.cz

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during my last prague visits i have been in several restaurants, best was one just below the opera house (same buliding where radio free europe is located 5 minutes from wenzel's square). unfortunately i don't remember the name - it is not touristic.

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Find out where Mick Jagger is holding his 60th birthday party. I bet that's good.

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U Kalicha is a historic beerhall/eating-place which has probably been touristified since we were there several years ago. They're likely to still be serving heavy stews and big plates of wieners and sauerkraut -- don't go there for haute or nouvelle cuisine! It now has a website, which is probably a bad sign  :sad:http://www.ukalicha.cz/english.html

I was there a couple of years ago. Yes it is touristified. But I still had a great meal (by Prague standards) and a great time. As I recall there's a tuba and accordian duo dressed in soldier garb that emerges from the kitchen and strolls the aisles between tables.


Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

Twitter

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Just to confirm previous views that David's is excellent, although the hill to it is quite steep and if you go by wheeled transport (cab/car) you're only likely to get as far as the police checkpoint outside the US Embassy. Lighting when we were there was quite subdued so they have obviously taken notice.

Restaurant Flambee was also a delight and the menu degustation is definitely to be recommended, pricewise it's about 50% more than David's. Desserts at both these restaurants are disappointing, Flambee particularly so.

As a general point go for local wines, not only are they excellent but they are considerably cheaper than the imports. Prague, although cheaper than major cities in Western Europe and the US, is clearly getting pricier and next year when they join the E.C. expect prices to rise much more rapidly.

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Not sure why the link for Zlata Studna doesn't work - here's the correct one. Still waiting to hear from the Black Rooster id they have opened in their new location. Will post when they do.

http://www.zlatastudna.cz/

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Heard back from the Black Rooster - unfortunately they won't be open until December.

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marktynernyc, thanks for all the great posts--we're going to Prague for a long Thanksgiving weekend--we got one of those $400 RT airfare plus 4 nights hotel deals through Nordic Travel. If you see this, what do you recommend for such a short visit--it's our first? FYI, we're looking for "echt" Czech...no Thai or pizza!

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WHS -

Here are a couple Prague sources I used:

http://www.praguepost.com/

http://www.squaremeal.cz/

http://www.gurman.cz/eng/

I would defintely have dinner in the Francouzska restaurant

in the Municiple House - the food and the Art Nouveau room

are a real treat - and be sure to take a day tour of the Municple

House - the galleries upstairs contain incredible examples of Art

Nouveau/Secession craftmanship.

http://www.obecni-dum.cz/e_pruvodce.htm

David - because I enjoyed the intimate feel of the restaurant -

only 12 twelve tables.

http://www.restaurant-david.cz/index_en.php3

What I liked about Sarah Bernhardt restaurant was that they had

seasonal specials, and the room is very elegant - located next to

the Municple House:

http://www.hotel-pariz.cz/restaurant_en.html

Another place I tried for lunch and would defintely go back for dinner:

http://www.upetrskeveze.cz/english.htm

I had wanted to try this place but was closed due to the floods -

http://www.svataklara.cz/

Only other suggestion - drink the local wines - the whites were very

enjoyable, the reds overall were okay (had a great one at

Upetrskeveze) - and the Bohemian sekt (sparkling wine/

champagne/cava) was quite competent and good.

I wanna go back Prague....

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Just returned from our long Thanksgiving weekend in Prague. We stayed in Mala Strana so we ate most of our evening meals there. 1st night: U Modre Kachnicky was haute Mittel Europa--chandeliers, drapes, candles, paintings in a mad color scheme of baby blue, fern green, pumpkin orange, and gold. Venison ragout and game pate starters were delicious. My wild duck was a little dry, but the hare with cream sauce was tasty. Service was unctuous, and the pianist a little heavy on the American pop tunes (though everyone applauded when he played "the Moldau"). We had Sekt, a bottle of decent Czech cabernet, and a good local Muscat dessert wine with the palacinka. Be sure to look at your bill; we were charged for 2 bottles of wine--when we pointed it out, profuse apologies and pear brandies on the house. 2nd night: Vinarna U Maltezskych Rytiru is in a vaulted cellar lit by candles, the austerity a refreshing change from the previous night. The welcome by the owner/hostess was warm, the service youthful and earnest (not inept). Starters were salmon tarts with horseradish cream and pikeperch fillet gratin with prawn and parmesan--both savory. Our main dishes were a very good Georgian-style lamb shashlik and duck breast in cranberry sauce. The signature apple strudel lived up to the hype. Wine was a rulaske modre red that was heavy on the tobacco and a little thin. This place is a great value for the quality. 3rd night: U Patrona was badly damaged by the floods--it's right next to the Charles Bridge on the Mala Strana side. The subsequent redecoration is very chic--pale green striped silk wall coverings, Biedermeier chairs, framed lithos. The room has only 5 tables, and on a Monday night, we were the only patrons til around 10:30pm. Service was attentive after they got over the shock of having an actual customer. The food here is Czech food filtered through a French lens. Game consomme was fragrant, mushroom risotto was earthy, the pork joint stuffed with sauerkraut was peasant food elevated to another level, and the rare duck was classic. The wine was the best of the three evenings--a Czech St Laurent red at a pricy 950 crowns. Blueberry creme brulee and a dried pineapple and sorbet pyramid for dessert. 4th night: we were experiencing the usual "fine-dining" overkill at this point, so we went to Malostranske Pub on Karmelita. Your basic smoke-filled dive with 50 cent Pilsner and 75 cent vodka shots. Gulas and pork schnitzel hit the spot!

For lunch we ate at Kolkovna, Olympia and U Suteru. All are a little more upscale than the typical Czech pub/cafe. Great soups, beer snacks, solid preparations of Czech classics like pork with potatoes and dumplings, pig shank, beef in cream sauce. You can also get Caesar salad and pastas.

Prague is still a great food bargain--none of our fancy dinners cost more than $50-60 a person. Similar quality in Paris would be 4 times the price, though nothing beats French service.

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I will be in Prague from November 4-7 and am looking for dining suggestions primarily in Prague 1 and 2.

Although I will certainly take part in pub culture....I would like to take in a higher-end meal or two.....I guess I'm looking for two different things:

1. a very-high-quality experience.....Bellevue has been suggested for this...and the website looks promising....I will be solo so a place where I will feel comfortable dining alone is important too....a good wine list by the glass or half bottle is important too (I'm certainly willing to try something local)

2. perhaps something "trendy"--cocktailish but with good food....I'm 29 so something where someone in my age range may eat on a Saturday or Sunday night

backgroundwise I'm from New York and culinarily wide-open to anything.

thank you.....

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I was in Prague last November and found a variety of good options for dining, Nathan!

Please look over the suggestions in two threads here at eGullet about Prague and the food:

Prague discussion (most recent)

Prague discussion (from a while back)

Lots of great ideas here! Enjoy!

One place which I thoroughly enjoyed was ZLATÁ PRAHA (inside the Intercontinental Hotel) .. read the reviews and see how it sounds to you!the menu


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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It's mentioned in one of the linked threads above - I had a great game meal at the Hotel Diana - It's at the end of the metro line and then about a quarter of a mile hike. Nothing high style, but an excellent kitchen.

Also mentioned in that thread, and akin to the pub culture you will be seeking is U Kalicha. Basic slavic fare, lots of beer and a wandering tuba and acordian duo. I mention it because, though I started dining alone, I soon was welcomed into a tablefull of Australians who took great sport in seeing how drunk they could make the lone American.


Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

Twitter

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You might want to check out the website of the Prague Post, the english language weekly. They have reviews of currently happening spots as well as an archive. They recently featured a place that serves both Thai and Czech specialities...hmmm. www.praguepost.com

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After numerous delays - Cerny Kohout has finally reopened in Prague proper.

Unfortunately I'll have to wait to go - spending New Year's in Patzcuaro and

going to Sevilla and Jerez for Semana Santa in March.

http://www.cernykohout.cz/

open every day 7.30 a.m. - 11.00 p.m.

 

address:    VOJTESSKA  9

                 PRAHA  1 - NOVE MESTO

phone         00420 251 681 191

 

near the National Theatre, on the bank of river Vltava.

Christmas Eve / Old czech Menu

Amuse Bouche

Baked snails chef’s style

with herbal sauce and boiled crayfish

Homemade fish soup with Jullienne vegetables

and carp milt gnocchi

Roasted pheasant breast Old Bohemian Style served

with traditional “Kuba” (barley-and-mushroom casserole)

and baked apple with sauerkraut and cranberries

Fried carp and pikeperch fillets served with Christmas potato salad

White chocolate parfait

Coffee served with Christmas Petit Fours

Apple punch with vanilla and caramel

Fresh Fruits

French cheeses

1950 K

65 €

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Sounds great. Where's Patzcuaro? We just got back from Bangkok, and I'm trying to figure out how to spend winters there, spring in Paris, summer in New Hampshire and autumn in Prague???

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Patzcuaro is in Michoacan, Mexico about 60 kilometers outside Morelia.

I'm giving thought to maybe going back to Prague or Budapest this September instead of Croatia because I'm going to Antalya this July after Spain this March. ( life should always be so difficult :laugh: )

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Any ideas for a post-opera supper/snack near the State Opera in Prague? Do restaurants/cafes tend to stay open late in that part of town? The preference would be for a Czech restaurant - attempts at pan-Mediterranean food we can find elsewhere.

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Any ideas for a post-opera supper/snack near the State Opera in Prague? Do restaurants/cafes tend to stay open late in that part of town? The preference would be for a Czech restaurant - attempts at pan-Mediterranean food we can find elsewhere.

off the top of my head I would say the municipal house. first of all, it is one of my favorite corners in the world - 4 fantastic buildings from different periods of time in site of one another. there is a cafe with nice cakes and coffee and beer, and a very nice sit down resteraunt with very good food.

the other option is the impirial cafe,- the food is less good than the archetcuture, but a great historical cafe with good beer, cafee and jelly donuts.

both are an easy walk from the state opera

both are open late.


Edited by odysseus (log)

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Thanks - sounds like just the ticket for a post-opera beer.

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Right around the corner from the Municipal House (I agree, great place!) is the Sarah Bernhardt. It's in a hotel, so may be open for dinner after the opera. Had a wonderful Easter dinner there this year!

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