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Oysters - The Topic


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MMmm oyster stew and chowder

T

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

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Lucky you!

Oyster-Artichoke Bisque is a favorite in New Orleans (originally created by Chef Warren LeRuth). Here's Chef John Folse's recipe: http://www.jfolse.com/recipes/soups/seafood16.htm

Also, oysters are a great addition to Spinach Madeline, another one of Folse's: http://www.jfolse.com/recipes/vegetables/sidedish45.htm

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Do you know about Steak & Oyster Pie?

One example: http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database...ste_70548.shtml

Simply gratinéed under the grill on the half shell is excellent (cream and parmesan). I think salt is the usual material for supporting them and keeping them level.

But Mr Harris at The Sportsman (just outside Whitstable, traditional English oyster centre) serves chilled oysters with coin-sized pieces of hot (grilled and spicy) chorizo...

And to swallow them whole... A bit passé. A bit of a waste, surely?

Edited by dougal (log)

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

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And to swallow them whole... A bit passé. A bit of a waste, surely?

Of course you are correct, a poor choice of words on my part. We certainly do chew them to savor the flavor. I should have said "too large for a comfortable mouthful".

My problem lies in reconciling my gross habits with my net income.

- Errol Flynn

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Quickly broiled on the half shell with finely chopped parsley and shallots in garlic butter and some crusty bread to attend to what remains in the shells.

Wrapped in wilted spinach, returned to the half shell and drizzeld with a light garlic cream sauce with a dash of cream sherry, dusted with bread crumbs and paprika and briefly baked.

What a grand find!

HC

Edited by HungryChris (log)
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If you must cook them, I prefer them broiled on the half shell with a tiny bit of butter and a light sprinkling of Old Bay. Cook until the edges start to curl just a bit. I've eaten hundreds of oysters this way.

Oyster season just opened on the Chesapeake two weeks ago. Go get yourself some. They are amazingly inexpensive if you buy them a bushel at a time. This gives you enough to cook them many different ways.

Any dish you make will only taste as good as the ingredients you put into it. If you use poor quality meats, old herbs and tasteless winter tomatoes I don’t even want to hear that the lasagna recipe I gave you turned out poorly. You're a cook, not a magician.

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All this oyster talk prompted me to go out and get some, plus a few other ingredients:

gallery_42214_6041_3848.jpg

6 oysters @ $0.49 each = $2.94

0.39lbs Atlantic shrimp @ $3.99/lb = $1.56

0.312kg salmon trimmings @7.69/kg = $2.40

Under 7 bucks, not bad. Now what?

gallery_42214_6041_88033.jpg

Chop the fish into regular chunks, shuck the oysters without spilling blood, and peel the prawns.

gallery_42214_6041_38049.jpg

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Collect all the shrimp heads and shells and simmer in a cup of water for 15 minutes, strain.

Chop an onion and some garlic, soften in butter, sprinkle in a little flour, pour in shrimp broth, add the raw seafood and simmer for a few minutes.

Add a little cream just before serving, salt and pepper. Serve over black ink noodles:

gallery_42214_6041_10564.jpg

Serves six - an oyster a piece.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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  • 4 months later...

Five months later . . .

Choice oysters were a mere three dollars for a dozen, a very low price and too hard to resist. So I baked a bunch.

1. Parmesan, s&p and Tabasco:

gallery_42214_6390_25276.jpg

2. Pesto and Tabasco:

gallery_42214_6390_27583.jpg

3. Lemon juice and herbs:

gallery_42214_6390_54300.jpg

4. Teriyaki and cayenne pepper:

gallery_42214_6390_25697.jpg

All were good, but no. 4 was the surprise winner with a nice balance of oyster flavour, umami, salt, sweet, and heat.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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$3 a dozen?? Damn! I get only TWO for that money! How many can you fit in your duffel bag? When will you start driving to Portland??!

"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

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while buying mussels yesterday, I was checking out the various oysters that were in the case. "Gulf Oysters" were about 50 cents a piece. Chesapeake Bay oysters were about $1.40 a pop, IIRC. There were two or maybe three other varieties available as well. Can't recall how much they cost, though.

I've never ever bought oysters in a store to take home. But I'll order them in restaurants. Not sure how these prices compare with other places, but my guess is that they aren't all that great based on other posts here. Still, i should buy some to try them out. Like comparing the Gulf Oysters (not sure if they are Texas Gulf Coast or some other state) with the Chesapeake Bay oysters.

My initial temptation would be to simply eat them raw on the half shell like I would at a restaurant. But I would give the quick broil method with some butter, shallots, etc. a try as well.

Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"

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johnnyd, these oysters are usually a buck or more each. It was a promotion and I was happy to pounce. I think the price of food actually affects flavor -- if it's super pricey, one savors ever so slowly. On the other hand, if it's a steal, you get that nice feeling of being in the right place at the right time -- but somehow the stuff is less precious.

jsmeeker, I had Gulf oysters in Florida a few weeks ago and they were excellent. I'm not sure I could tell them apart from cold water Atlantic oysters.

I still think live is the best way to enjoy an oyster, but it's a lot of fun to tinker.

Edited by Peter the eater (log)

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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My Louisiana born grandfather considers Pacific oysters to be "utter swill". I'm a West coast semi-native and a current New Orleans resident: I need to do a compare and contrast but I can't say I'm detecting any vast differences. (Seems like the Pacific guys are bigger, especially the 5 bite monsters they serve at my favorite Chinese restaurant.)

Opinions on the differences?

Also: as a Sacramento resident, seems like it'd be wise to mention Hangtown Fry. Which is probably simply one of those delicious Chinese oyster omelets with a different name....

And another Norcal favorite (though simple and good, i think they don't hold up all that well to NOLA's divine beauties) - BBQ Oysters.

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My Louisiana born grandfather considers Pacific oysters to be "utter swill". I'm a West coast semi-native and a current New Orleans resident: I need to do a compare and contrast but I can't say I'm detecting any vast differences. (Seems like the Pacific guys are bigger, especially the 5 bite monsters they serve at my favorite Chinese restaurant.)

Opinions on the differences?

Your LA grandfather simply likes what he grew up with. No crime in that, but it's a big world out there with some heavenly oysters. There are only a handful of species harvested in the US. What makes for so much variety is location, location, location. And size isn't an indicator of species or place of origin. The Hog Island Sweet, grown in Tomales Bay in CA is sold in five sizes, xsmall through xlarge. One of the smallest oysters is the Olympia from WA state. It's tiny and delicious!

There are a couple of websites that are very good for info on oysters. One is more scientific and the other has detailed maps showing the many US locations where oysters are grown and harvested.

One is The Nibble.com (look under oysters) and the other is oysterguide.com.

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Reading this entire thread, I wanna add my thoughts on oyster size. In the Philippines, we get tiny oysters called sisi. This is about as small as your thumb and sometimes just a little bigger. The meat is plump and juicy, and very sweet.

Coming here to Korea, I see humungous oysters bigger than the palm of my hubby's hands (and he's got big hands). It's almost scary to eat them like that but theose monster oysters are usually found at seafood grill restaurant stalls that pop up at local festivals and fairs. Most oysters here in Korea are sold in a half shell (already shucked with most of the liqour gone) for about $10 a dozen, and shucked oysters in saline solution (?) for about $4 for 2 dozen.

I usually make oyster po 'boys or oyster cerviche to go along with grilled pork chops/spareribs. I always want to make oyster rockefeller but lack the herbs needed in the ingredients.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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please don't cook them. :sad:

yesssss! sacrilege sacrilege sacrilege! :smile:

i regularly eat 2 dozens fines de claires directly over the kitchen sink. tabasco, curly parsley, many slices of lime, and sparkling wine to wash everything down. just... heavenly!

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please don't cook them. :sad:

yesssss! sacrilege sacrilege sacrilege! :smile:

i regularly eat 2 dozens fines de claires directly over the kitchen sink. tabasco, curly parsley, many slices of lime, and sparkling wine to wash everything down. just... heavenly!

For breakfast? :smile: That's hardcore. I'd just call in sick and stay in my pajamas all day if I did that.

I've never had one of those fancy green European oysters but when I do, it'll be raw. When oysters are plentiful and inexpensive, I can only handle so many raw. Next time I'd like to try and smoke a few.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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fancy? really? sorry :)fines de claires are small but quite fleshy. sweet and exquisite. it's rather frustrating that i can't open them as fast as i can slurp. but then i pay a fraction for 2 dozens eating over the kitchen sink. (it was for lunch, yesterday.)

i've seen dried oysters in Canton and HK. smoking them sounds good, actually. do show us how you eat them, _visually_.

Edited by BonVivantNL (log)
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  • 4 weeks later...

Mr. Dianabanana is on his way home from Seattle, having purchased two dozen oysters last night, and having forgotten to open the plastic bag they came in so they won't suffocate. At this point they have been in the bag (refrigerated, of course) for about 15 hours. I just talked to him and he is pulling over to open the bag now.

Should I bother to go shopping for an oyster-centered meal tonight? Or will they be D.O.A.?

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Mr. Dianabanana is on his way home from Seattle, having purchased two dozen oysters last night, and having forgotten to open the plastic bag they came in so they won't suffocate. At this point they have been in the bag (refrigerated, of course) for about 15 hours. I just talked to him and he is pulling over to open the bag now.

Should I bother to go shopping for an oyster-centered meal tonight? Or will they be D.O.A.?

While it is not a good idea to leave them in a sealed bag, they may still be alive, the only way to tell is to shuck one and smell it, if it smells like anything but the ocean or is completely dry it is dead... also if they are open and dont close on their own (which oysters only occasionally do) they are dead.

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I agree with SauceRobert. You need to shuck one and smell it. If it smells a bit off, then you have to discard it. Another sign is that their shells are a tad open, then they're dead. Although here in Korea, I've seen people buy up dead oysters (open a bit), cook them and show no sign of food poisoning of some sorts.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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I agree, if they stink or remain ajar I wouldn't eat them.

Are you making Oysters Diana?

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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