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spaghetttti

Frightfully freaky fruit

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Definitely do not get rambutan with brown skin. I've had generally good luck when the skin is red and shiny all around and the fruit is reasonably firm to a gentle touch (when such a touch was possible). I don't believe I've had your problem with rambutan skin. It's harder to peel than lychee for sure, and you can choose to use a knife instead of your bare fingers, but it's peelable either way. Strangely enough, I had some terrific rambutan in Beijing last August -- not once, but every time I bought it. Why were rambutan better in Beijing than Kuala Lumpur?! :shock:


Michael aka "Pan

 

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Great photos folks.

I grew up in Asia and I didn't recognize alot of the fruit displayed in this thread!

I recall eating two types of lychee -- they were distinguished by sweetness of the fruit and size of the seed. The "lor mai chee" had very small seeds, and usually were much sweeter than regular lychee.

Anyone have photos of both?

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At the hotel we stayed at in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, two fruits are banned from the rooms: the durian and the mangosteen. I can understand the reason to keep durians out... but the mangosteen?

At the nearby Jalan Alor, the mangosteen stand is situated right next to the durian stand. Tables and plastic chairs are set up for tourists hankering for durians and mangosteens to enjoy the fruits right there. What a fortunate coincidence!

The durian stand at Jalan Alor:

gallery_18308_881_60196.jpg

Mangosteens at Jalan Alor:

gallery_18308_881_22317.jpg

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At the hotel we stayed at in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, two fruits are banned from the rooms: the durian and the mangosteen.  I can understand the reason to keep durians out... but the mangosteen?[...]

Yeah, that's really odd. You'd think they'd want that fragrance in the air.

Did they serve any fruit in that hotel for those who wanted it? If so, what kinds?


Michael aka "Pan

 

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Did they serve any fruit in that hotel for those who wanted it? If so, what kinds?

I assume so, but I never looked at the room service menu. But at the breakfast buffet, there were the usual non-threatening assortment of papayas, starfruit, pineapples and watermelon. They also served a fruit cocktail with sea coconut (nata de coco) but that's not really a fruit, is it?

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[Edit] Nata de coco is apparently a coconut product:

http://asiaep.com/my_com/status/nata.htm

Nata De Coco, is an organic high fibre food product, cultivated by fermentation action on coconut, sugar, water and a specially developed nutrient.[...]

It seems to me from the pictures on that site that nata de coco is that coconut jelly sort of thing. No, I guess that isn't a fruit.


Edited by Pan (log)

Michael aka "Pan

 

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I think those delicious luscious mangosteens were banned in the hotel because the beautiful fuschia inner shell has beet-like qualities = the color bleeds and stains. Something of concern for hotel housekeeping & laundry? What do y'all think?


Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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That makes sense, Yetty.


Michael aka "Pan

 

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Those mangosteen stains are a pain to clean! But the fruit is so good to eat (like it so much more than durian). Eating it is kinda a messy proposal. If they are ripe enough, I usually place one between my hands and squeeze till it cracks. This takes some skill as you usually don't want to squeeze that hard that you mush up the fruit and spew purple badness all over yourself.

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gallery_11814_148_13951.jpg

A good friend went to his hometown in East Java and brought back lots of goodies. He only had a half kilo of these, but they all were for me!

This is one of my favorite fruits, we call it buah sarikaya/nona. It is pretty ugly looking, and a mess to eat with all the seeds, but the sweet luscious pulp is irresistably addicting!


Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Don't they look like little hand grenades? :laugh:


Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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:laugh: Hand grenades... I always used to think the same thing!

In the Philippines, we call these Atis; they were in season last time I visited. Delicious. Thanks for the photo Yetty!


Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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This is one of my favorite fruits, we call it buah sarikaya/nona.  It is pretty ugly looking, and a mess to eat with all the seeds, but the sweet luscious pulp is irresistably addicting!
It's one of my favorite fruits, too! It's called Sitaphal India, been years since I had one, now I'm craving!

Are these available in US? If so, where?

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That one is unfamiliar to me. Does it taste similar to anything I might have tried before in Malaysia?


Edited by Pan (log)

Michael aka "Pan

 

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Hmmm...I have tried cherimoya imported to New York from somewhere in Latin America, I believe, but I found it rather uninteresting: Kind of insipid, if I remember correctly. It could very well import poorly, though.


Michael aka "Pan

 

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If I've got the right fruit, I believe it's called a cherimoya in English-speaking countries. I've never seen one in real life--I ID'ed it from pictures in a couple of books. Some more info here and here.

Yup, that's it! I thought it looked familiar. In English it's called Cherimoya or Custard Apple. You can occasionally find them in Asian markets in Hawaii and Hispanic markets elsewhere in the USA.

Here's another list of plant names:

http://www.plantnames.unimelb.edu.au/Sorting/Annona.html


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Buah nona! We used to have a buah nona tree at the old house when we were little. The texture is very similar a soursop but much sweeter (almost to the point of it being sickeningly sweet ... but then I don't like super sweet fruit :huh:), without the refreshing tart undertones of a soursop. The ones we get here in Malaysia are around the size of a baseball.

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In Australia they are quite common and would be sold as 'custard apples', although I have noticed that the fruit of this name in the UK has a realtively smooth skin. Very sweet, delicate flavour, can be very atery if over ripe. Nice as a sorbet.

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Hi Suresh, nice to see you :wub: . Got a recipe for cherimoya , err, sitaphal kulfi? Would love to try it.


Edited by spaghetttti (log)

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Now here's something I'm very fond of  -- sawo.  Not freaky at all, but  is rather (if you'll pardon the expression) plain Jane. It looks similar to fifi's sapote, but it was described as having sweetish avocado qualities.  When I think of avocados,  the texture I tend to think of is creamy.  This seasonal sawo is very honey-sweet, but has a bit of a grainy texture to it, not creamy at all.  I believe that this may actually be a sapote. 

i12204.jpg

Thats a chikkoo/Chikoo/Chiku (in India). Oh it's been long since I have had this.

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Hi Suresh, nice to see you :wub: .  Got a recipe for cherimoya , err,  sitaphal kulfi? Would love to try it.

Yo Yetty!

It's very easy,

you hand squeeze the pulp off the seeds, blend with reduced milk+sugar and freeze.

Indian kulfi is really condensed milk icecream. You could use any fruit to make a different version. My favs are mango, litchi and sitaphal. If I have special guests I serve the kulfi in rose apple halves.

P.S. Dragonfruit is bland, bland, bland !


I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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Suresh, there's no fermentation at all in the milk that's used for kulfi in India? I thought I detected just a hint of yogurty taste in it.


Michael aka "Pan

 

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