• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
duckduck

More desserts with strange names...

17 posts in this topic

Mario just did a segment on Food Network with a recipe called virgin's breasts. Eric Ripert has nun's farts in his book and Nancy Silverton has nun's breasts. Any other strange desserts out there that you've heard of?


Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Occasionally, I entertain a few thought-experiments in the area of peculiar dessert names. Always, beignets soufflés are the first to come to mind. Students of the far side of culinary French recognize them as pets-de-nonne – the “nun-farts” you’ve mentioned to instigate this thread.

Of course, chocolate vermicelli is an odd name as well, when you realize that "vermicelli" translates as "worms!"

Not so odd, but rather quaint, is the too-rarely-prepared fluff of caramel-coated pastry w/ a heart of crème brûlée known as puits d'amour. Religieuse translates directly as "nun," and is a classic pastry that resembles a nun in her habit. Then there are the Italian cookies called brutti ma buoni – “ugly but good” and the more commonly known ossa di morte, aka "bones of the dead." Also, baci di Giulietta & baci di Romeo are delightfully playful names for sweet biscuits. Perhaps we might also include pane coi Santi, i.e., "bread w/ saints."

Italian dessert cookery comprises a host of fancifully named items. Another being Bocca di Dama, "mouth of a lady." The Italians produce a witchy liqueur, STREGA.

The long rectangular puff pastry named jalousie means, w/ good reason, "venetian blind." Kadin göbegi literally translates as "lady's navel." Kab el ghzal is rendered as "gazelles' horns." Langues de chat are those delicate French "cat's tongues." Reine de Saba, not so weird, but mythical-sounding nonetheless, is that dense, rich, moist chocolate-and-almond cake, "Queen of Sheba."

Oh, I've just recalled another comical "nun" pastry: Barriga de Freira; this one is from the Portuguese and spells out as "nun's belly."

Pfeffernüsse, when you think of it, is humorous...Peppernuts! And, pierogi are Polish "pockets." And how about the cobbler known as "grunt" for an appetizing-sounding dessert? Or those Indian sweetmeats, referred to as "barfi?" On second thought....

The Japanese must have a huge lexicon of bizarre culinary terms. I immediately think of Shabu shabu, the name of a dish which actually comes from the steaming sound of the food being cooked; the Japanese hearing "shabu, shabu" from the hissing vents. Speaking of steamed, there's a Thai steamed custard named Sankhaya. I wonder what that term means in English. Or that Sri Lankan coconut custard known as Vattalappam?

Venturing toward the soda fountain, we encounter a plethora of glammed-up names. For instance, there'sStrawberry Blonde, echoing a film that starred the beautiful Rita Hayworth. Oomph Girl à la Mode...named for Ann Sheridan, the red-haired actress & WW II pinup queen. Plus sundaes such as Adam & Eve, Angel's Nest, Aunt Lizzie, Barney Google, Brownstone Fronts, Knickerbocker Glory, and Maid of the Mist.

Roald Dahl invented some wacko names for desserts in his Revolting Recipe cookbook: Roald Dahl's Revolting Recipe cookbook. It has recipes mentioned in his childrens' books like Lickable Wallpaper, Scrambled Dregs and Fresh Mudburgers.

The goofiest -- and most revoltingly conceptualized -- instructions I've ever seen for partyfood: Purchase the plastic bowl that fits in a child's potty training chair. Wash the bowl and prepare lemon jello per package directions. Float miniature O-Henry bars in it, refrigerate, and serve. Horrible!


Edited by Redsugar (log)

"Dinner is theater. Ah, but dessert is the fireworks!" ~ Paul Bocuse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Breasts seems to be an ongoing theme -- perhaps patissiers spend too much time with their craft and not enough with their wives. I had a traditional dessert in Athens a couple of nights ago called, roughly "Turkish woman's small breasts." I have no idea what the original Greek was.


I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mentioned in the movie "Amadeus":

Tits of Venus


I'm a canning clean freak because there's no sorry large enough to cover the, "Oops! I gave you botulism" regrets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many Lebanese desserts are named after women's body parts, you have "lady fingers/bride's fingers" that refer to a baklava-like pastry that has a tube shape. Another one called "Zind El Sit" roughly translates to "the ladies arm", these are phylo wrapped around a cream filling and deep fried then drizzled with syrup.

Other non-feminin dessert names include "Lokmat El Kadi" or "The judge's bite", small fried dumplings soaked in syrup. We also have "Kol Wi Shkor" or "Eat and Thank" a nut filled dessert.

Elie


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always been a bit weirded out by the idea of a "tete de negre" (negro's head), which is a hollow sphere of crispy sweet meringue (or two half-spheres sandwiched together?) coated in chocolate buttercream and rolled in chocolate sprinkles.


She blogs: Orangette

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been awhile since I looked at the recipe, but if I remember right a nun's fart is a light pate choux dough that is deep fried.


Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Two Fat Ladies did a show featuring Nipples of Venus. They used fraise de bois for the actual nipples, which appeared centered on a strawberry-Cinzano cream concoction.

A friend of mine once did a dessert he called Surprise Surprise, which was a balsamic ice cream featuring garlic-roasted peanuts. :hmmm: Good name, really.


"My tongue is smiling." - Abigail Trillin

Ruth Shulman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had forgotten the Nipples of Venus. That was a funny episode. Thanks for the replies! Some interesting stuff!


Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mentioned in the movie "Amadeus":

Tits of Venus

I think it's "Nipples of Venus."

I make a confection: cocoa and coconut merinques, and I call them "Nipples of Nefertiti," since they're dark brown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A recipe for Beignet Soufflés – Nun’s Farts!

2 oz. butter, at room temperature

Pinch of salt

½ cup all-purpose flour

2 large eggs

1/8 teaspoon orange oil or 1 tablespoon dark rum

Vegetable oil for deep-frying

Powdered sugar

Combine 4 oz. water with butter & salt in saucepan and bring to boil. Remove from heat and add flour all at once. Stir vigorously until mixture leaves sides of pan and forms a ball around the spoon. (If a ball does not form almost immediately, hold saucepan over low heat and beat briskly a few seconds. Cool slightly.)

Add eggs, one at a time, and beat vigorously until mixture is smooth and glossy after both additions. Add orange oil or rum, if desired, and beat again.

Add oil for deep-frying to a wok, heavy skillet, or deep fryer to a depth of about 2 inches. Heat to 360° F. Drop dough by tablespoons into hot fat. Fry until browned on all sides and center is cooked through, about 2 minutes per side. Fry and test one first to determine approximate cooking time. Drain on unglazed brown paper. Serve hot, sprinkled with powdered sugar.

[Classic Beignets are, of course, yeast-raised fried breads.]

Last evening, while musing on the subject of fried breads, I thought of those delightful little doughnuts known as Zeppole. (They're a toothsome specialty of Naples.) I have a recipe at hand if you're intrigued.


Edited by Redsugar (log)

"Dinner is theater. Ah, but dessert is the fireworks!" ~ Paul Bocuse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Two Fat Ladies did a show featuring Nipples of Venus. They used fraise de bois for the actual nipples, which appeared centered on a strawberry-Cinzano cream concoction.

A friend of mine once did a dessert he called Surprise Surprise, which was a balsamic ice cream featuring garlic-roasted peanuts. :hmmm: Good name, really.

I made these for a VM cast party one time (my girflriend at the time didn't cook and was one of the narrators). They were a hit at the party, and after dropping them off I was invited to stay, but there was too much progesterone in the air for me...

It was interesting trying to make them in a dormitory kitchen with only the front desk's cooking utensils...

Surprise Surprise reminds me of the old gag about "Tuna Surprise"


I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if this is exactly on-topic, but one bakery I worked at had a popular Halloween

tradition of selling "GingerDead Men". We would cut out the gingerbread man shapes and then

"kill" them. Cut off their heads.....use a toy car to put tire tracks across them as if they'd been

run over. Amputate a few. Pipe some nooses around their necks. Stab a couple. It was great

fun. Customers loved them, and a great stress outlet for us bakers too. :raz:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
what's a nun's fart??

In the wine world, nun's fart refers to the hiss a properly opened bottle of Champagne makes.


Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark Sommelier, thank you apprising us of that sly bit of trivia. I had not known of it until now. However, please do not think that I have any intention of disputing the authenticity of your reference, but might you agree that it is perhaps somewhat more appropriate to signify the gasp of air as a "monk's fart?" (Especially when we consider, for example, Dom Perignon.) Also, from a sheer technical angle, a true lover of champagne does not let the cork pop, as too much carbonic gas & flavour escape the bottle. Nonetheless, I'll always find genuine humour when recalling your reference to flatulent abbesses!


"Dinner is theater. Ah, but dessert is the fireworks!" ~ Paul Bocuse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By nonkeyman
      I finally found a place better than Molly Moons.
      In Seattle Washington for Ice Cream. I was actually not very found of Molly Moons. It is to cloy for me. Has anyone here been to Sweet Alchemy?(They don't have a website yet...so here is a blurb about them)
       
      It is on 43rd and University Way. I thought it was Haagan Daz still because they haven't changed the banner. It is really good! They just are slightly expensive...3.80$ for their cheapest cone. I forgot to check if they have a children's scoop. They do a lot of fun and solid flavors. A tale of two teas, butter beer, Blueberry Lavender, Chai Tea, etc. They even have a very good vegan option called Monkey Berry Bash! It is made with coconut milk and really is quite good.
       
      Besides the price. I think it is worth to go once!
    • By Darienne
      Yesterday I made my familiar go-to simple lime/cream cheese pie with one egg, some milk, lime juice & zest, etc, covered with a dark chocolate ganache: heavy cream, a dollop of butter.  It's in the fridge covered with a plastic topper but I can cover it with plastic wrap or aluminum foil.

      Today's lunch guest is not coming...onslaught of sleet, freezing rain, and now snow...oh goodie...winter's here...  Now she is slated for next Thursday.  Is there any possibility that the pie can last that long and not poison or at least revolt us?

      Thanks.
    • By cakewalk
      Can cake batter be frozen, then defrosted several days, weeks, or even months later for baking? If so, does this cause any changes in the way the cake bakes? This seems preferable to baking and then freezing the cake(s) because of considerations such as room in the freezer, but mostly, for me, because of time considerations. Has anyone ever done this?
    • By ryangary
      I bought a box of molten chocolate cakes from Presidents Choice that you cook from frozen in the microwave for 45 seconds or so. They come out perfect but the chocolate they use is inferior. My question is, if I was to make my own chocolate cakes let them cool, then freeze them, reheating them in the microwave for the same amount of time would they work. I like the fact that I can have a dozen or so in the freezer and just nuking them when friends pop in. Help me make this work! Please.
    • By Panaderia Canadiense
      Hi all! I'm trying to perfect my lemon bar recipe, which is from my grandmother's Purity cookbook with all sorts of notations and changes she made. It's perfect in terms of flavour and the pâté sucree base works exactly as it should, but the topping is coming out too fluid.
       
      The topping is 3C sugar, 1/4C lemon juice, the zest off of those lemons, 1tsp baking powder, 6 eggs and 2C coconut.
       
      What can I do to firm it up a bit, so that it stays put once I cut the bars? Would cornstarch or tapioca flour do it?
       

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.