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Swisskaese

Honey Cake

38 posts in this topic

There is a good, long thread on types of honey which shows my personal preferences for baking honeycakes in my house: Personally enjoy clover and orange blossom honeys ... and you?? :wink:


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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I believe a fairly neutral honey, such as a blend works best

A strong single flavour honey is too assertive

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Ohh Yummmm!! Honey and Apples??Thank you for posting the recipe Pam :biggrin:


Vanessa

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Pam R Oh, so yummy! Let me try a little piece? :)

I like Russian honeycake and my customers love it!The recipe is similar to one that was given here.


I love to decorate cakes and you may see my cakes here: http://foto.mail.ru/mail/bonya_l/1

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I need some help troubleshooting the Honey Cake recipe that so many people have recommended (cake recipe is here: Marcy Goldman's Honey Cake Recipe) I have made this recipe twice and still seem to have problems with uneven baking. After two tries, I have have been unsuccessful getting an evenly baked cake in a 9x13 pan. I would like some help achieving my goal.

The first time I made the cake, not closely reading the recipe, I used an insulated cookie sheet and baked it in a 9x13, gray, chicago metalllic, heavy gauge, pan. While the sides firmed up quickly, it took a long time for the center to set. When the center finally set and the tester came out clean, I removed the cake from the oven to cool. During the cooling process, approximately a 2"x3" area of the center fell completely. I cut out the fallen center, and served the rest of the cake which was delicious.

The second time I made the cake, I closely read the recipe. I inverted one heavy guage jelly roll pan in the oven while it was preheating and used it as a base for baking the cake. I also wrapped moistened magic cake strips around the 9x13 baking pan. Again the sides firmed up first, but the center firmed up quickly afterward. Chastened by my first experience, I let the cake bake for 10-15 minutes past when the cake tester came out clean. This time there was a very slight and amost unnoticable depression in the center of the cake. One side of the cake (side towards the back of the oven) was noticably overdone. The rest of the cake is delicious.

In both instances, the oven temperature was 350F, I used standard and not convection baking, and did not use a turntable.

Obviously, given the size of the pan, I am having problems with the sides of the cake baking faster than the bottom. I am at a loss on how to to proceed. After thinking about this I have come up with the following possible areas to explore.

a. Lower the temperature of the oven - possibly by 25F?

This would slow baking down and perhaps allow the sides and bottom to set and not be overdone at the same time.

b. Turn on convection

More evenly distribute the heat in the oven so the back of the cake would not get done first.

c. Find an oven proof turntable

More evenly distribute heat across the baking pan

d. Get a terra cotta garden tile (12" square) and use that instead of a upside down jelly roll pan

A larger thermal mass under the bottom of the pan to provide more heat to bake the cake from the bottom up.

e. Give up on the 9x13 pan and bake the cake in two loave pans

Something I would like to avoid. This approach would guarrantee to more evenly distribute heat to the cake batter allowing the entire cake to be set at the same time.

Does anyone have suggestions on which of, and how much of, these approaches, or other approaches, I should take in solving this problem? I do not have much baking experience and would appreciate the guidance of an old and experienced baker.

Thanks,

-- Mache

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Maybe try turning the cake, say halfway through the baking time?

I do this for my 9 by 13 pan when I use it.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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Maybe try turning the cake, say halfway through the baking time?

I do this for my 9 by 13 pan when I use it.

I will try that. Are there any other suggestions?

-- Mache

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I was going through cake recipes in the BBC cookbook, "101 Cakes & Cookies", which is a wonderful cookbook filled with pictures and recipes of beautiful baked goods. I came upon a Devonshire Honey Cake which caught my eye, looked so good and moist. I then remembered this thread. Here is the recipe if anyone wants it...

http://desarapen.blogspot.com/2005/07/shf-10-honey-cake.html

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Mache, try using one or (preferably) two cake-decorating "nails" in the 9X13 pan. Place them in the bottom of the pan with the points facing up, at about, oh, the "40-yard lines" of the pan. The nails conduct heat into the middle of the cake and help it to bake evenly.

I wonder if the coffee that's so common in these recipes is intended to simulate the darkness and flavour of the buckwheat honey? Just a thought.


Fat=flavor

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Have you tried baking Marcy's honey-cake in a bundt pan? I think you may have better success with it.

My honey cake batter is also quite 'wet' and I think it needs the heat in the center - it takes quite a while from the time the cake starts to firm up on the outside for the inside to catch up.

When I bake them at work I do use the convection - so you could try that.

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I wonder if the coffee that's so common in these recipes is intended to simulate the darkness and flavour of the buckwheat honey?  Just a thought.

I think you might be right.

I just made Nyleve's honey chiffon, and I love it! Too dry, but I think it was my fault--first time I made this cake.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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I wonder if the coffee that's so common in these recipes is intended to simulate the darkness and flavour of the buckwheat honey?  Just a thought.

Could be, but there are many recipes that call for both coffee and buckwheat.

I prefer tea.

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