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Chardonnay wine


naguere
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At our 'Monday drinking club' (Every six weeks, Witherspoons, Cheltenham)

One of the group said he enjoyed Chardonnay wine, but had so far only had Australian Chardonnay and what could i suggest. I told him to try some French made wine , chardonnay/chenin blanc to expand his horizons.

What advice could we give him to take him down the primrose path of wine discovery?

Picture of The Monday Drinking club in action- not a glass of wine in sight.

i11818.jpg

Editet to put a Z in Horizons

Holy Moley.... I see a glass of chardonnay.

Edited by naguere (log)

Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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Do you know what styles of wine your friend likes?

Most Australian chards tend to be similar to California chards: rather buttery and oaky (the butter coming from malolactic fermentation). Some prefer this golden, almost syrupy quality in their white wine.

However, French Burgundian chardonnays are flinty and steely with a crisp, fruityness to them.

I might recommend he start off tasting wines from the various the same region to learn how a region is similar vs. tasting the same grape from five or six regions.

If he likes them big and buttery, he might like to try a series of Chardonnays from the Russian River valley in California. Nearby, from Sonoma, I would recommend Chateau St. Jean.

Caveat: I'm not a buttery chard lover -- I like mine Burgundian style.

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From the picture which shows stamped pint glasses and the reference to Witherspoons, Cheltenham I figure that Naguere lives in or around Cheltenham in Gloucestershire and he is referring to JD Wetherspoons on the Bath Road.

For expanding Chardonnay horizons I would suggest that said friend get down to the local Waitrose and check out their selection of Chablis and white Burgundy. Probably a bottle of the Herrick Chardonnay as well as a couple of American Chardonnays (they will be pretty generic, individual vineyards are hard to obtain it's more Gallo etc.). Should give an idea of where the preference lies.

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From the picture which shows stamped pint glasses and the reference to Witherspoons, Cheltenham I figure that Naguere lives in or around Cheltenham in Gloucestershire and he is referring to JD Wetherspoons on the Bath Road.

Wow color me impressed... I can't wait to find out if you are right! :raz:

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Your friend poses a tough challenge.

Living in the UK, your primary access to chardonnay will be wine from France and Australia. Genrally speaking, they offer a marked contrast in style (although you will find some over the top, buttery, oaky French ones and some sleek Oz ones).

The trouble is, for the price your friend is paying for Australian Chardonnay, it will be difficult to find excellent representations of Chablis or other White Burgundy. You can get appellation designated wines, which can be great values from good poducers in good vintages. But when you start with the village, premier cru, or grand cru wines, the price increases expontentially.

You can find a "medium" range is some of the wines of Pouilly Fuisse and Pouilly Vinzelles. You will also find attractively priced St. Veran, Rully, and Macon wines, but some of these are hit or miss.

But if your friend is into the "experimentation" aspect of it, and wants to pay to experiment, then he should have fun.

We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

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From the picture which shows stamped pint glasses and the reference to Witherspoons, Cheltenham I figure that Naguere lives in or around Cheltenham in Gloucestershire and he is referring to JD Wetherspoons on the Bath Road.

Spot on Britcook. Cheltenham and all, it is.

Leckhampton road is my leafy area.

Tanabutler: I guess he would spend up to five pounds on a bottle.

Thank you all for your advice. I will pass it on.

Edited by naguere (log)

Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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OK naguere, some suggestions, all currently available in Waitrose for less than a fiver (although some are currently on offer)

From France

A classic Burgundy, Macon Villages £4.99

2 from the Loire, Waitrose Loire Chardonnay, £4.49, Domaine Petit Chateau £4.49

and 1 from the Oc, Herrick Chardonnay £4.23

From Chile

San Andres £3.99, Casillero del Diablo £4.99, both in the more "tropical" style

And finally the joker in the pack from Sicily Inycon unwooded Chardonnay £4.99

For the question you didn't ask I would also recommend "Les Fleurs" Chardonnay-Sauvignon blend, also from the Oc (made by the Grassa family), on offer at 20% off making it 5.59/bottle. Very approachable.

The reason I recommend Waitrose (other than the fact it does excellent wine) is if I'm not mistaken the magazine on the table is Waitrose Food Illustrated. And you're spot on with leafy, Leckhampton Road is my preferred approach to Cheltenham, very attractive.

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