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Bux

Alain Ducasse -- Plaza Athenee

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Lizee

Thanks so much for the report. I have been waiting to see what you would think about Ducasse. I have a table booked for late november but I am not sure now. When you pay those prices, everything takes on a different edge I guess and its kind of hard to enjoy yourself and relax. IF its all perfect then fine but if anything goes wrong, or the staff have an off day, then you really feel squeezed. How much the meal come to in total if you can remember?

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We had quite the opposite experience with service at ADPA in Feb, 2002. Our reaction to the food was similar - not the most creative but perfectly cooked. Service was impeccable though. In fact, of the six 3 starts visited inside a week, they were tops in service.

thanx for the update..

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I know people who recently escaped ADP for less than 500 Euros for a meal for two. Remember that the prices are inclusive of tax and service, so you don't have to depart upward save for the option of a small additional gratuity. So if the five course (three savory, cheese, dessert) menu is still 190 Euros or thereabouts and you go with the low end of the wine list you can dine there on a budget (yes I say that sarcastically). Once you start getting into individual plates that cost more than 100 Euros then you're talking about something else entirely, of course.

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I've very happy a few months ago to pay a visit to the Plaza Athénée Paris.

I had been in this place at the beginning of the years 70,Mrs Marlene Dietrich still living just in front of Plaza.

Curiously,as I was 16,I didn't remember this place.

I have been lucky that a journalist talks about of one of my products,whom Plaza ned.

The object of this article is not to promote it.

Nevertheless I decided,last August ,to visit again Plaza with my mather and some friends,incognito in order to test the Plaza.

We spent about 2 hours in the plaza ,and mostly the time

I staid there ,I didn't know that I was Philippe Raynaud

(they didn't know me personnally).

I must say,objectively that the welcome was perfect,the drinks,lovely,and a good ambiance (we were at the bar).

It is only at the end of the 2 hours that I said that I was Philippe Raynaud,object of the article.

It was very pleasant ,but unfortunately we couldn't eat among the geranium.

Someday,maybe it will happen.

I will keep in my memory a good moment in this place.

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Philippe, were you at that very hip cool bar? I think there's only one bar so it must be it.

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That would be the "Bar Montaigne", designed by a former collaborator of Philippe Starck. It's very cool, with 19th century gold leafing, and a giant ice'cube like bar, and lots of design, low-hung lights and supermodern cubby-holes. Lots of model action, and good barmen! Otherwise they have a tea-room, before the entrance of the bar.

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We were there for dinner at AD/PA after having aperatifs at a friend's place already and declined an offer from the hotel sales rep my wife knew, to join her for a drink at the bar. It was not so much that we were late for our reservation--no one would minded that--but I already had as much as I was willing to drink before that kind of meal. We did regard her suggestion that we stop in and look at the bar on our way out as an order. Ice blue and ice cube cool as well as "cool."

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“Turbot without Genius is better than Genius without Turbot.” Alain Ducasse.

On Monday, my wife and I had dinner at Ducasse at the Plaza Athénée. (Lest people mistake me for someone who can afford this on a regular basis, I should say that the funds for this Ducasse/Gagnaire excursion came after we moved house from California to London, and had something left over from selling the car. Obviously we weighed up all of the options; which came down to paying off the future mortgage, or having the lamb chops at Ducasse. Well, I have to be honest. It wasn’t even close – and I am writing this from under a park bench with a tarpaulin thrown overhead, although I’m pretty sure it’s leaking, and I think last night we were robbed, and I can’t feel my feet...) Anyway – to place this story in its rightful perspective, I must insert the phrase: “my wife is allergic to mushrooms.” This is not so much a punchline, as it is a tragedy the likes of which would’ve made Sophocles kick his sofa through the window for not having thought of it sooner. On the one hand we have Oedipus and his mother. On the other, my wife and the white truffle of heaven, forever slipping from her grasp. You see what I’m saying? Oedipus was a whining mother’s boy.

What this means is that for any restaurant we go into, I have to hold down the waiter, while my wife beats him with a bat like Al Capone, shouting: “No mushrooms! No Truffles! No Porcini! No Truffle oil! Capite?” Now understandably, some people take offence at this. But this is the three stars and reputation of Ducasse that we were dealing with – so not a bit of it. Had Ducasse been there himself, I’m sure he would have joined in.

Now, where the food is concerned, obviously we are dealing with a master. But has anyone seen the decor? It looks like some revisionist historical hallucination – think the French revolution run by Jean-Paul Gaultier. It’s not that it’s bad bad, just extremely odd odd. A post-modern comment on luxury. First of all, think of a ballroom where Dumas would’ve happily placed a timorous, panting aristocratic protagonista. Then add Crystal chandeliers swathed in silver/golden chain-mail-looking sheaths. Where there would have hung a 10 foot tall painting of the King (were we in those times), hangs two 15 foot slightly-bleached photographs of extremely pale, unhappy looking, gawping teenagers (a comment on the old peasants of Paris, pressing up against the palace gates, crying for bread? And of course, the point becomes that you have to ignore these photographs, as if you were Marie-Antoinette, in order to get through the meal. Which is, thinking about it now, absolutely hilarious.)

Anyway, we were seated. The man with the beautiful trolley of champagne came by, and did his duty. As did the water person with their tommy-gun selection. The young man came with a couple of beautiful butter dishes (conveniently holding said sculpted condiment). The waiter came and my wife beat him with her mushroom bat until he looked bored, took our order, and went away.

And so – to the meal. First –

- a pre-amuse: a perfect little sandwich of creamed spinach between two disks of puff pastry – about the size of a quarter (or 10 pence piece in the uk). I know this doesn’t sound that interesting; but if you ever find yourself on your death bed, with a selection creamed spinach and puff-pastry amuse to choose from, this would make your final moments extremely happy ones – if slightly shorter than you’d hoped for, due to the amount of butter involved.

- An emulsion/foam/gazpacho of basil over a brunoise of vegetables and lobster.

I should précis my comments by saying that I had told the waiter I didn’t want any shellfish, including Lobster (Why? Cos I’m an idiot, but that’s another story), but they brought this to me anyway, which has some bearing on a later issue (In his defence, I had said this in English).

The taste was wonderful and creamy. The lobster was tender (and made me glad he’d ignored my request). The foam tasted rich, of basil and good oil, but the seasoning was a bit – shall we say - cutting edge. My wife thought it too salty – I didn’t, but was surprised at the amount.

- Asperges vertes de chez “Blanc”, comté/vin jaune/truffe noir

Beautiful large asparagus, with series of three sauces – one dark with truffle, one green – asparagus purée, I think - both criss-crossing the plate, looking very attractive. And finally a white wine sabayon, served by the waiter.

In my opinion the waiter over-sauced the plate with the sabayon, ruining the visual effect of the saucier with the other liquids. Also, tasting the sabayon on its own, I found it overly-bitter. In the dark sauce, I tasted and smelled no truffle, which disappointed me, as that was the reason I had ordered the dish. Nevertheless, there was a great ‘meatiness’ to it – like you find in a glace or balsamic reduction. All three sauces mixed together I found a little confused. The overall effect tasted good, and the asparagus was perfect, but I’m not sure it was what the chef was aiming for.

- Foie gras de canard des landes glacé d’une sangria

A torchon of foie gras, covered by a thin layer of jelly made from sangria.

This was my wife’s starter, and really solid. The foie gras was gentle, and welcoming (if you can believe that from a piece of liver). The sangria jelly – I presume made with gelatin rather than meat glace – was really marvellous – fruity, and vivid – and went with the foie gras like a sauterne. Very clever.

- Bar de ligne, marinière au jus de persil, morilles

Sea bass, beneath a foamy sauce of parsley, with small croutons and morelle mushrooms.

This, for me, was the triumph. It was like staring at a the roiling ocean from 10,000 feet; foam tipped waves, white crests (forgive my slightly over-romantic delusions), and an archipelago of morelles, each capped with a butter soaked wafer-thin crouton. Hungry yet? It looked like it took a team of 5 three hours to put together. I’ve never been a huge fan of fish, but this was truly astonishing. I couldn’t tell you how they cooked it – but I suspect they showed it the furnace of the open oven, like prisoners were shown the instruments of their torture, and let fear of pain do the rest. I bet they had to chase that fish around the kitchen for three hours with a meat cleaver before it agreed to surrender – but boy did it taste good. The parsley foam was incredibly buttery – and all the better for it. The morelles, almost fragile and delicious. The small wafers would’ve given a coronary to a choir boy. Ah, yes, Ducasse....

- Turbot de bretagne à plat Argenteuil

You’ll have to forgive my lack of details here – I was a bit swept up in my Bar de Ligne. I believe part of the garnish was a tapenade (but my memory could be playing tricks). The taste was magnificent. Other than a change in colour, the fish showed no evidence of having been cooked – by which I mean caramelised edges, or flecks – it was simply perfect in texture, and translucent, and it made me realise what all of the fuss was about.

Unfortunately, now it all started to go wrong. After they had cleared our plates, my wife started to feel increasingly ill. And, of course, deeply upset at feeling ill, because we were here, finally, having travelled to Paris, having achieved a reservation in Ducasse, and spending all of this money etc. The bottom line? She was feeling mushroomed (which, had Freud not wasted all that time with sissy-boy Oedipus, he would’ve seen the true undercurrent of terror spreading through the Viennese salons and opium dens...). I could go into symptomatic details, but allow me to spare you. Now, to be clear, the waiter – and later the chef - assured us that none of the dishes she ordered contained any fungus – be it truffle or mushroom or truffle oil etc. He had also written it very clearly on the ticket (which they found for us). She hadn’t tasted any of my food which did contain mushrooms. So all I can imagine is that somehow there was cross contamination. The management inquired, fairly, if it was something she could have had at lunch, but the symptoms tend to be immediate. As Mr. Vonnegut once wrote: So it goes.

At the same time as this was happening, the meat course arrived. Ah, wonderful. My wife’s in tears, and would you just look at those olive-encrusted lamb chops? Those glistening sweetbreads? What could I do? I took her outside to sit down and get some air, and said we should go. She refused, saying I should go back in and finish the meal (what a trouper she is). I said no. She said yes. We haggled. She negotiated me down to at least trying the two meat-courses. And lest you all think me cruel and unusual, I was absolutely prepared to get into a cab. As it was, I marched double-time back to the table, where they brought me the two courses (which they had kindly kept warm for us). And with a fork in each hand, gave a display of speed eating and piggery that I think has probably been lacking from the 3-star restaurant scene for a few hundred years.

Anyway – despite this – my unfair and rough impressions:

Ris de veau doré à la florentine, morilles

calf sweetbreads with jus and morelles

These were beautiful, delicate, and to my thinking, classically prepared (as opposed to the Gagnaire preparation I was to have the next day). The jus was balanced, with all the flavour, but without the clawing taste of over done veal stock (of course – there ain’t no ‘duh’ in Ducasse, dummy). Although I think they were floured, they weren’t crispy – but I had the plate waiting for 10 minutes while I was outside (my point being, I don’t know if they were crispy to begin with).

Agneau “biberon” du Limousin, Côtes et filet, jus à l’olive

Tiny lamb chops, encrusted with olives.

I’m not an expert on Provencal cooking, but it strikes me that at its best it must have some of these elements. These were big, powerful flavours for a 3-star establishment to be dealing in – rather than subtle whisperings you sometimes find big name chefs playing with. The lamb was perfect. Really. If your son was to run off with a sheep, you’d want it to be this one.

Anyway, due to my quick exit, I missed the famous Baba au rhum, and the other desert we had ordered. And the petite fours.

Two days later, I put on my serious husband voice, and called the restaurant to complain and find out what might have happened. The Director de Salle, Dennis Courtiade, went off and spoke to everyone involved. He seemed genuinely concerned, and did his best to reassure us that there had been no mushrooms. Also, they hoped we would be able to return, so they could make it up to us. Unfortunately for me, and perhaps for them, they may have lost the trust of my wife, and I’m not sure I’ll get her back again.

The bill, with two glasses of champagne, 1 glass of sauterne, 2 of red wine, and 2 bottles of water, came to 495 Euros. We had to order the desserts in advance, although obviously I didn’t get to try them. Certainly, I don’t believe our bill was lessened due to my wife’s distress, which would have been appreciated. Of course, this distress was doubled when, the next day, she couldn’t come with me to Gagnaire because she felt too ill.

So it goes.

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What a great pity. It's clear you appreciated the food and that the night was ruined. I suspect your wife knows by now when she is having an allergic attack brought on by mushrooms, although there's an outside chance there may be some other food she rarely eats that may also be a problem. It's difficult to know if cross contamination was the problem. Apparently your wife is very susceptable to fungi and is able to trace past attacks directly to mushrooms in a dish. I have two friends that are allergic to fish and seafood. One can pick out the shrimp in a dish in Chinatown and eat the rest, while the other gets sick from the smell of fish fying. One has to wonder if one of the sauces used in a dish might have begun life as a stock into which someone innocently threw a few mushroom parings although the restaurant might not usually put mushrooms in that broth. It's a difficult situation and one has to sympathize with you and your wife even if they find no fault with the restaurant. It sounds as if they were genuinely concerned and I appreciate the degree of fairness with which you present the facts. I do suspect you convinced the waiter of the seriousness of your concerns. Ffault here is hard to find.

I have pertty much tended to ignore the room when speaking of my meal at AD/PA, I managed to ignore the room as much as possible while I was dining there. I doubt it was redecorated on the cheap, but the efffect is much as if it were. The premise may be sound, but in practice it was a dour room. As for the two photographs, I'm happy to have it confirmed they were not Cavin Klein advertisements, though truthfully, a large billboard would have enlivened the space, made it more human and allowed the restaurant to lower the price. Fortunately we were able to enjoy the food which was quite exquisite.

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I don’t believe our bill was lessened due to my wife’s distress, which would have been appreciated.

It also would have been the smart thing to do. Most restaurateurs -- especially those who own several restaurants -- know they'll sometimes have to comp or discount meals even if there's no fault involved. It's good customer relations and good public relations. At McDonald's, if a customer's kid drops a soda on the floor, the restaurant replaces it. It's not the restaurant's fault, but it's standard procedure to serve the customer in this manner. If a customer gets sick in the middle of a meal -- for any reason -- and it doesn't look like an obvious con job, the smart thing for a restaurant to do is comp or discount the meal.

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MobyP -- I agree with Bux that to no fault of the restaurant, a mushroom could have easily slipped into the stock, but also with FG that the restaurant should have done something price-wise out of good will. Really shocking that they did not do so (or at least offer you something price-wise on a return, like comping your wife).

While perhaps not Ducasse, Roussillon in London (SW1) currently is making Ducasse's Baba au Rhum paired with a glass of finely aged rum. I'm not a fan of rum babas, per se, and ordered this one more out of getting a glass of rum (which sounded, and indeed tasted, quite good at the moment) and trying the famous Ducasse recipie. The baba was extremely light compared with others I've had in Paris bistros (including a baba singled out by Lebey), but ultimately tasted like caked soaked in liquor -- not my thing.

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Also, they hoped we would be able to return, so they could make it up to us.

I'm hanging on to a thin strand of hope that by this they meant to offer you a comped or discounted meal on a future occasion. If not, I too would be, if not full-blown shocked, at least surprised.

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One has to wonder if one of the sauces used in a dish might have begun life as a stock into which someone innocently threw a few mushroom parings although the restaurant might not usually put mushrooms in that broth.

Exactly. My thought was the jelly on the foie gras - like a reduced old style aspic (with calve's or pig's feet for the gelatin in the bones), and Ooops, the odd mushroom skin à la Escoffier, with some madeira perhaps to make it fruity etc. Call it sangria jelly. It wouldn't take much.

And Fat Guy (when's your site going back up - that's how I got here to begin with) - to be, perhaps, unfair, I don't think we were the classiest table in the room. My suit was borrowed (though my wife's pretty stylish). I don't believe a smart MC would worry about us being regulars. Still, some Nobless Oblige in the right direction never hurt anyone. The truth is, it is exactly tables like ours that should be protected by management, because we can afford it all the less. We take greater risks, spend a higher portion of our (in)disposable income.

I think the man was asking us back so he could be generous. I'm just worried it's too late.

The problem with having an allergy is that, having taken all the trouble required to let the staff know about it - sometimes in a different language - you start to feel persecuted if it still happens. The symptoms are pretty specific. Oh well.

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Roussillon in London (SW1) currently is making Ducasse's Baba au Rhum paired with a glass of finely aged rum.

Thanks. I'm in London for the long haul, so I'll look it up.

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The problem with having an allergy is that, having taken all the trouble required to let the staff know about it - sometimes in a different language - you start to feel persecuted if it still happens. The symptoms are pretty specific. Oh well.

I don't doubt that one can feel persecuted even if the staff takes all the precautions one could hope for. Even if there's no fault on the restaurant's side and no blame to be placed, life just seems unfair at times. I took ill early in the meal at one of the last meals to be served at Robuchon. It was also my first, and obvioulsy my only chance to eat there. As I recall I left the dining room for a few moments, recovered my color and a bit of composure. When I returned, I cancelled the rest of my meal and watched my wife eat for the next few hours. To the best of my recollection we were charged and paid for two tasing menus. Although we cannot afford many of these meals a year, it was the loss of the opportunity more than the cost that bothered me. Were the restaurant still in operation with Robuchon at the helm, we would have been back at our next visit to Paris.

It was clear that there was nothing about the food that affected my condition. I had been ill before on the trip that started with Lots of foie gras and goose fat in two meals at Daguin's Hotel de France (it was his final year as well) and more at Michel Guerard. On my return to NY, my doctor scoffed at the idea I needed a major checkup. "Crise de foie" was his quick diagnosis. I've learned to pace myself. I even order vegetables as a first course at times, not that I haven't still been known to follow foie gras with boudin noir and call it a balanced meal if there's fruit in the dessert.

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But has anyone seen the decor? It looks like some revisionist historical hallucination – think the French revolution run by Jean-Paul Gaultier.

The Plaza Athénée's interior was designed by Patrick Jouin, who is now Ducasse's designer of choice. He definitely bears the watermark of his time spent under Karim Rashid, especially in his ready-for-home products. There's a relatively decent article on him in this month's Surface.

Much peace,

Ian Lowe

ballast/regime

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Ducasse is perfect. His staff can do no wrong. :blink:

But seriously, even though I'm bidding/begging to stage there this summer, I do think you and Bux nailed it. It's sooo common to put mushrooms in stock that it must be scary for people with allergies like your wife.

And from the restaurant owner/management perspective, it's great that you called and that they seemed appropriately concerned but if you want something specific might I suggest that you ask for it? In that witty diplomatic way that we know you can do.

500 bucks and 2 ruined meals for your wife - including missing Gagnaire - is worth asking for something.

And I really do like the interior. :smile:

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In France, as in other countries, most very expensive restaurants take their client's needs very seriously, unless those needs indicate the diner has no respect for the restaurant and shouldn't be there in the first place. It does seem to appear that the French medical profession does not adhere to the same philosophies as it's American counterpart, especially when it comes to diet. As a result, French restaurants may take a more skeptical look at certain requests.

Bux, it's a funny thing about fine French chefs. They do seem to scoff at some requests - yet seem obsessively concerned about matters of digestion. Our chefs constantly warn us about the delicate digestive systems of what will primarily be an older clientele - yet dismiss issues such as shellfish allergies.

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Has anyone been there recently? I mean, since Jean-Francois Piege, the exectutive chef, moved to the Ambassadeurs, at the Crillon?

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No, but I ate at Les Ambassadeurs about a month ago. Chef Piège seems to be doing lovely things there.

I shouldn't think that there would be a huge difference at ADPA though, knowing that Ducasse runs quite a tight ship that would less likely be dependent on any particular person. But what do I know. Perhaps Lou can tell you.


Edited by pim (log)

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I have. If you're worried - don't. I thought that my experience would be diminished because I knew the mechanics behind the tricks - but it wasn't - it was still magic. Classic dishes like the Langoustines and Caviar are still on the menu.

Pim, thanks - good to know my boys are holding down the fort at Les Ambassadeurs until I get there. :biggrin: M. Piege would not have it any other way.

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I am not sure whether this would be the best place to put my review at ADPA this Spring (yeah, I'm both busy and lazy :biggrin: ). Anyway, here is what I think

Food

We ordered the classic menu of Alain Ducasse - I find that the Brittany lobster and Bresse chicken being the highlight for my dinner (not saying the scallops in coconut curry or the signature dish - langoustine with caviar are inferior). The tasting menu are not that many, only 1 amuse, 2 entrees and 1 main dish plus the regular cheese and dessert. I find the portion is very generous (better be given the price). The cooking is conventional, only 3-5 ingredients per dish, but the execution of each dish is very precise. Everything is cooked to pretty much closed to perfection. No surprising dishes unfortunately ...

Wine

Ducasse's establishment is famour to have top notch wine collections, both qualities and quantities. Here is not exception either, but this would be a bit irrelevant for me since I'm not willing to spend the wine for the price exceeding my food - the mark up price is very high as expected (about 3-5 times if not more). I like my champagne ('98 Henriot Brut Rose) offering smooth texture and firm structure as well as the white burgundy ('99 Corton-Charlemagne Grand Cru) with almond and flower-scented, light in palate with tangy acidity. Unfortunately, the head sommelier is bit snobbish - he's not happy when people question or disagree with his suggestions.

Decoration

Well, maybe this is not very important for most readers here - please see my more details review should one want to know more about the ambiance. In short, elegant and luxurious!

Service

First class, one of the best one could have but more like in a formal style. Don't expect much of relaxing and very close conversation like the one that I had at L'Arpege. You may talk to differents staffs since they are not specifically assigned for certain tables.

Thanks to Phyllis Flick from eG forum for helping me translating the menu. The more details review is here Ducasse Paris. Or if you just want to see the pictures, you could go here ADPA pictures. Enjoy!

Actually, I also ate at almost all of Ducasse's restaurants in Paris. I don't particularly like Aux Lyonnais (perhaps due to the heavy sauce for most dishes) and Benoit. In fact, I prefer Spoon (nice fusion for some dishes) and Le Relais du Parc. However, none of them really worth another visit for me.

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Somehow I could not find the old thread for ADPA, so I will start one here

I suppose I simply another Ducasse supporter … well, mainly for his fine dining establishments – not really a big fan of Spoon franchise, Beige and Adour are not too bad. My review here actually took place about 1.5 years ago, it may sound cliché but it’s true: better late than never. Here was my dinner in Oct 2008

Food (and wine) - 96/100

This was the 2nd time I dine here, I mentioned that I visited this place before and the restaurant took note of it. It was obvious as they welcomed me. As I was talking to Denis about my meal for today, he kept smiling and saying – don’t worry and I’ll take care of it – indeed he delivered. For pre-amuse bouche/appetizers, he already gave me a small portion of pate a la Lucien Tendret – it was nice and the size was also right (I could not really take too much foie gras). Despite ‘only’ ordering the menu pleasures of the table, ADPA served me the classic langoustine with Iranian caviar for the amuse-bouche – as expected it was tasty – light and balance with firm langoustine and fragrant bouillon. The first 2 dishes: hot & cold spider crab and dover sole were well executed. However, I found that these two dishes though the ingredients are superb and technically stunning, it was not that delicious (it reminded me of Alleno’s dishes which are very good most of the time but not too rich in taste)

The explosion of flavor took place in the main course: veal prepared 2 ways – one with lard of colonnata and the other one were caramelized (this one is particularly tender and good!). The veal’s juice with some (black) truffle sauce enriched this dish, yet balanced by the vegetables on the sides. I could not really decide whether Bardet or Moret prepared better veal. Oh also before this, they gave me a bonus – foie gras ravioli with consommé. The meal was very filling. The cheese was good, but I could not enjoy it as much … if only I was still hungry. Luckily, Denis invited me to the kitchen where I met a gentle giant – Chef Moret – a friendly and humble chef. This bought me some times to energize myself when I ate my chocolate raspberry dessert. The chocolate was almost as divine as Cerutti’s crispy praline; the sour raspberry sorbet was refreshing after ‘heavy’ meal earlier. Wines? It’s good that they served wine by the glasses now though not that cheap (some is about as expensive as L’Arpege’s). My meal in 06 was a very solid 3*, but this time though not as good, the standard was still very high. It was 96 pts or equivalent to 2 ¾* in my notes

Service (and ambiance) - 97/100

I almost always have good experience dining at Ducasse’s establishments; among them ADPA probably triumphs all in terms of hospitality. Denis Courtiade is arguably French’s (and possibly the world’s) best directeur de salle. He not only led his brigade but also hands-on in doing so. The team’s movement in the dining room was very smooth and seemed effortless; the luxurious chandeliers would not prevent them from making guests felt comfortable and at home. I experienced it before and I did it again, so yeah the consistency was there. The atmosphere? I suppose there’re plenty of people talking about this – all the interiors are pretty much nearly over the top. I’m convinced that ADPA was one of the many places which could constantly deliver unique 3-star dining experience. Not so soon, but I know I will return here one day …

Here is the longer review – review Ducasse Paris Fall '08

Here are the pictures – pictures Ducasse Paris Autumn 2008

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Mmm, the memories come flying back...thanks for sharing. I loved ADPA, especially after shopping at Chanel round the corner lol. It was the perfect place/meal to top off the ultimate Parisian experience. I was given a little gift of some sea salt after the meal - love to find out where I can buy some. Did you get some too? It is such a nice touch. At Guy Savoy, I got a really nicely-presented welcome gift (even before the meal!). Ahh, the style of the French (swoon).


Edited by superbadkitty (log)

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