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hazardnc

Texas foods online

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I am planning a post kitchen reno party, and want to introduce my Carolina buddies (most are transplants from Rochester, NY) to foods from my native Texas.

I have some family recipes to use (brisket, jalapeno cornbread, peach cobbler or pecan pie) but I want to round out the menu with some prepared foods I love and miss: kolaches (the sausage ones) a good smoked sausage and maybe a few tamales. Here are some links I found - are they any good?

http://www.dallastortilla.com/

http://sausage.cc/index.html

http://www.weikels.com/

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I love the sausages from Southside Market. Never had the smoked ones, but I'm sure they're equally tasty as the fresh.

Also been to Wiekels and had an apricot kolache. Haven't been able to embrace the whole sausage version. But their apricot one was good!

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If I were eating mail-order from Texas, my top two links would be:

Black's BBQ

(For brisket and sausage.)

Mozzarella Company

(For...well, just about anything they make.)

As for the links you've posted, Southside's sausage is very good, as is that of most of the famous BBQ spots in that area of central Texas east of Austin (e.g., Black's, Kreuz, Smitty's, Luling City Market). The Dallas Tortilla & Tamale factory makes pretty good tamales. But, even when they're fresh, they're not better than you can make at home; so I'd probably pass on them.

Scott


Edited by Scott -- DFW (log)

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Let me add a resounding second to the nomination of Black's brisket. I send some every year to my kids in California and it's wonderful. If you like Southside sausage, then order brisket from Black's, and sausage from Southside.

As for the tamales, why not have a traditional "tamalada"? That'd be really fun and give your relatives a real taste of Texicana.

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New Braunfels Smokehouse is good as well for sausages, smoked stuff of every description, and their shipping is excellent.

Isn't there some buttkicking smoked sausage where you are?


Edited by Mabelline (log)

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What is a tamalada? Some sort of enchilada/tamale cross breed? I left Texas in 1990 - is this a recent invention like tur-duck-en?

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A tamalada is a gathering of many folks for many hours with many laughs and tales that produces dozens and dozens and dozens of tamales for the holiday season - frequently multi-generational, and often, these days, amongst my crowd, lubricated with tequila - it goes back centuries, I'm sure

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and often, these days, amongst my crowd, lubricated with tequila -

Yeah, but everyone knows that you hang with the wild girls :raz:

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Wow - embarrassing! I grew up in Texas and have never heard that word before. I am sure a tamalada is fun - and one certainly could use the help in making tamales. They take a lot of work!

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Yeah, but everyone knows that you hang with the wild girls  :raz:

but one wild girl has been on the road again this summer....

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Wow - embarrassing! I grew up in Texas and have never heard that word before. I am sure a tamalada is fun - and one certainly could use the help in making tamales. They take a lot of work!

If you are still in contact with any Mexican friends in Texas ask them about the tamaladas. Traditionally, the women -- wives, daughters, cousins -- gather in the kitchen to make the tamales while the men lounge around the living room and yard drinking beer and inhaling the enticing aromas from the kitchen. The men will tell you, though, that their job is equally important. They serve as the "tasters." :cool:

The tamalada takes place sometime around mid-Nov--early Dec. And, just as Memesuze says, that's when all the tamales are made for the holidays. The family will make hundreds of them so that the supply lasts through New Year's.

If, when you grew up in Texas, you were not close to any Mexican families, you quite likely would not be familiar with this tradition. But there is no doubt that it was going on when you were here. It is centuries old, for sure.

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