Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

nebaneba


torakris
 Share

Recommended Posts

nebaneba translates into English as sticky, slimy, gooey, etc, the thing is in Japan these are all good things, at least when it comes to food.

When I am reading western cookbooks they always give special techniques for making naturally slimy foods like okra to be ans not slimy as possible. Personally I love the slime! The Japanese take something like okra and mince it up into little tiny pieces to make the slime even more pronounced. Sometimes they even take a bunch of slimy foods and mix them all together to make a slimy dish set for kings.

Yesterday for breakast we had a dish of two slimy foods, nattou and melokhiya (a green)

i11559.jpg

what are some of your favorite Japanese slimy foods

favorite combinations?

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...
  • 4 months later...

So-called nebaneba shokuhin (slimy food) are known to have various health benefits.

According to this webpage (Japanese only),

the main components of slime are mucin, alginic acid, pectine, and chondroitin sulfate.

I found a webpage describing mucin:

http://us.healthsupplementfood.com/info.php/91/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And of course,

mulukhiya (Jew's marrow)

I just boil it in water, drain, and eat it with ponzu and dried bonito flakes (katsuo bushi).

Out of curiosity, how did this dish get its name (Jew's marrow)? Forgive me for saying so, but this name is quite odd, to say the least. :blink:

Edited by mascarpone (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And of course,

mulukhiya (Jew's marrow)

I just boil it in water, drain, and eat it with ponzu and dried bonito flakes (katsuo bushi).

Out of curiosity, how did this dish get its name (Jew's marrow)? Forgive me for saying so, but this name is quite odd, to say the least. :blink:

I think molokhiya or melokhiya isn't usually translated this way.

It's most popular in Egypt. It's probably just usually explained, rather than translated, as Egyptian greens or an Egyptian stew. I've heard it translated as "royal greens" or "bush okra." Jew's Marrow is probably a strange corruption of "jute mallow".

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

Link to comment
Share on other sites

nebaneba translates into English as sticky, slimy, gooey, etc,

In defense of all things gooey (melted chocolate, Nuttela, etc.), I must insist that it be excluded from the "nebaneba" list. :smile:

Just so nobody gets the wrong impression, "nebaneba" implies more of a sticky or viscuous texture. Of course, some gooey foods do happen to be sticky, but not all.

Favorite nebaneba food: yamaimo.

Edited by sanrensho (log)
Baker of "impaired" cakes...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

nebaneba translates into English as sticky, slimy, gooey, etc,

In defense of all things gooey (caramel sauce, melted chocolate, Nuttela, etc.), I must insist that it be excluded from the "nebaneba" list. :smile:

Just so nobody gets the wrong impression, "nebaneba" implies more of a sticky or viscuous texture. Of course, some gooey foods do happen to be sticky, but not all.

gooey is now officially excluded! :biggrin:

I actually think slimy is the best description but it also sounds the worst...

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Yamaimo are usually small, varying in size between that typical for yukon gold potatoes down to the size of baby or new potatoes. They aren't often found in US markets, at least in Seattle. When I saw them in Japan it was often from a roadside (well, train station side) vendor in a rural town.

Nagaimo are long tubers that can be a good meter in length, but are usually cut smaller in supermarkets.

The texture and starchiness is similar.

Is there a distinction between yamaimo and namaimo?

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is there a distinction between yamaimo and namaimo?

namaimo or nagaimo?

namaimo often written as 生芋 literally means "raw potato" though you don't see it used all that often. It can also be used to refer to the "potato" used for making konnyaku, either as the name of the potato or the process by which the konnyaku is made. The latter is a more common usage. You may see konnyaku labeled as namaimo konnyaku, this means it is made the old fashioned way by grating the raw "potato" (imo) this gave it the gray color. Modern methods use coloring from sea vegetables such as hijiki to give it a grey color.

Recipes for making konnyaku from scratch call the "potato" (imo) different things, most commonly konnyaku-imo but also namaimo and 生玉。I am not sure of the reading of the last characters but possibly ikutama? (namatama, sounds funny :raz: ) Anybody?

now if you actually meant nagaimo.....

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I meant nagaimo, silly me :) Sorry for the confusion, but thanks for all the great info!

I'm desperate to make myself yamakake.. I've been eating since I was 8 and absolutely love the stuff. Mostly the variety where the nagaimo is grated to a slimy goo, but recently I've fallen head over heels for the matchsticked-variety. YUMMMMMMMM.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I meant nagaimo, silly me :)  Sorry for the confusion, but thanks for all the great info!

I'm desperate to make myself yamakake.. I've been eating since I was 8 and absolutely love the stuff.  Mostly the variety where the nagaimo is grated to a slimy goo, but recently I've fallen head over heels for the matchsticked-variety.  YUMMMMMMMM.

the two are really interchangeable, I usually use nagaimo because it is cheaper and find the size easier to grate.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now for the $25,000 question:  I am familiar with the term yamakake, but is there such a thing as nagakake or even namakake?

no :biggrin:

Which ever type of mountain potato you use it will still be yamakake.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I will admit that I have some texture issues with food and am still working hard to overcome my inherent dislike of slimy foods. I do like okra when it's fried but not sure about a preparation that would emphasize its slimy texture.

I was eating some miso soup with wakame a few minutes ago and have to admit that I even find wakame a little too slimy when I eat a lot of it at one time.

I wonder if there is a good way to get used to this type of texture?

Jennie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...