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Hominy?!


lmarshal1
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As a base for butter-poached lobster tail. Or seared shrimp.

I've used it with caramelized onions and shredded lamb shoulder with a bit of mint oil. With a roasted pepper bisque then a salad of dandelion grens with queso blanco and a chiptle vinaigrette before, followed by rack of lamb with chimichurri then a cheese course (fresh chevre to camembert etc to ten year cheddar then a few bleu) with fresh corn tortilla chips).

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I've used it in a soup with Italian sausage. It was a recipe from the Better Homes and Gardens crockpot cookbook and I thought it was really good. You probably don't need a recipe though. :wink:

Rachel Sincere
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Jinmyo: I had not thought of hominy as a base for a meat dish. I'm pretty much of a novice and a "peasant" (even at my advanced age!) so that some of your menu suggestions are a bit out of my league, but I may rise to the challenge one of these days!

RSincere: I like the sound of the soup suggestion. My husband adores Italian sausage. Do you remember any of the other ingredients? (Re: not needing a recipe! See above comment about my peasant/novice status!)

Thanks for the suggestions. lkm

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I make an oven-roasted vegetable medley thing with various vegetables when I have just a couple of each, not enough to do one side dish with one vegetable.

Potatoes, carrots, parsnips, celery, onions in chunks with snapped green beans and so on. Enough to cover the bottom of a 9 x 11 or 9 x 13 baking dish.

Season with kosher salt and pepper and perhaps some herbs de Provence or just rosemary or thyme.

Then drizzle with roasted garlic oil and roast in a slow to medium oven (300 F) for however long it takes for them to just begin to become tender but with some resistance to the fork.

I then add a can of hominy with its liquid, stir well, and return to the oven to finish cooking, about another 25 minutes should do it.

When this is done correctly, it should have an almost meaty quality to it, but without any meat products of any kind included. It becomes a sort of oven vegetable stew.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Memesuze: Somehow hominy just seems Mexican to me in the first place. Guess it's the corn.

I have made a casserole of hominy, seeded chopped tomatoes, green bell peppers, onions, celery, etc., with cumin and crushed red peppers, that was pretty tasty. lkm

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Maybelline: With or without liquid? How finely processed? I do love tamale pie! I can imagine the processed hominy with oil and spices for a crusty topping and a base to soak up the spicy, tomatoey drippings. Sounds good! lkm

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My Mom being from the South we had hominy a lot as a kid, just plain, loved it.

One dish I like is a Hominy with Tomatoes au Gratin (from a cook book "The Lewis & Clark Cookbook" by Leslie Mansfield.

3 cups hominy, drained,

2 cups chopped tomatoes

2 Tablespoons fine dry bread crumbs

1 teaspoon minced fresh sage

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teasopon freshly ground black pepper

1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese

preat to 350 dgr and in a ligyhtly oiled 9X9 baking dish:

spread the hominy, then spread the tomatoes over the hominy. Sprinkle with the bread crumbs, sage, salt, & pepper, then top with the cheese and bake for 30 minutes

The mexican dish Pasole is another delicious hominy dish as well.

Charles a food and wine addict - "Just as magic can be black or white, so can addictions be good, bad or neither. As long as a habit enslaves it makes the grade, it need not be sinful as well." - Victor Mollo

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Okay, this is the working-single mother's invention to fill three picky girl sprouts up. Drain the canned hominy, add your cumin, garlic salt , and some minced onion. Just pulse till it resembles your wet masa for tamales. Spray a good size pyrex dish, spread about 1/2" for a bottom layer. Put in all your other tamale ingredients in(this is entirely up to you- my two biggest winners were shredded pork or chicken) and when you get near the top cover with a good crust layer. Oven at 350 for about 30 minutes, then put your oil on top and brown it up.

My kids called this my Mexican Lasagna.

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Memesuze: Somehow hominy just seems Mexican to me in the first place. Guess it's the corn.

I have made a casserole of hominy, seeded chopped tomatoes, green bell peppers, onions, celery, etc., with cumin and crushed red peppers, that was pretty tasty. lkm

You can buy "Mexican-style" hominy in many regular supermarkets and certainly in all Mexican markets. They have three or four brands at the Vallarta supermercado here in Lancaster.

It is regular hominy with Mexican seasonings.

They also have both yellow and white hominy.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Andiesenji: I'll look for the Mexican seasoned hominy. We have a fairly large Hispanic population in our area. I see more and more Mexican grocery stores and Mexican items in the other stores. I've used both the yellow and the white hominy. Lancaster, PA? We were there two years ago for a convention and will be there again with the same group next June. Love the state. Hate the turnpike! Thanks for the reply. lkm

Maybelline: Thanks for the recipe. Is there a way to print individual posts here or to mail them to myself. It's easy to do on a couple of my knitting forums, but I can't seem to figure it out here. I always get an error message. I like the name: Mexican lasagna. lkm

CtznCane: I like the sound of the Hominy/Tomatoes au gratin. I wasn't expecting so many good replies to my query. Thanks. lkm

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I was going to start a thread on hominy too!

I have actually never cooked it in my life, but I recently picked up a couple bags at a Latin market around the corner from my sister's house in Boston.

Most of the recipes I have found refer to the canned product, what do you do with the dried stuff?

I have both yellow and white.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Okay, this is the working-single mother's invention to fill three picky girl sprouts up. Drain the canned hominy, add your cumin, garlic salt , and some minced onion. Just pulse till it resembles your wet masa for tamales. Spray a good size pyrex dish, spread about 1/2" for a bottom layer. Put in all your other tamale ingredients in(this is entirely up to you- my two biggest winners were shredded pork or chicken) and when you get near the top cover with a good crust layer. Oven at 350 for about 30 minutes, then put your oil on top and brown it up.

My kids called this my Mexican Lasagna.

Ha ha ha.

That's a good idea.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Lancaster, PA? We were there two years ago for a convention and will be there again with the same group next June. Love the state. Hate the turnpike! Thanks for the reply. lkm

Nope. I am in Lancaster, California.

I am just 9 miles from Edwards AFB where the shuttle used to land and where the test pilots fly the new aircraft that are in development. I got to see the first roll-out and the first flight of the Stelth bomber.

Nothing like being in the middle of a tricky bit of kitchen work and having sonic booms shake the house. It used to bother me but now I can decorate a cake and never notice it.

This area is known as the "high" desert as it is an ancient seabed at over 2000 ft altitude and almost flat as a pancake but surrounded on three sides by mountains.

We have a great deal of ethnic diversity in a city of almost 130,000 - Palmdale, next door to the south is about the same size. The population growth has been incredible.

We have, besides the Mexican supermarkets, Korean, Thai, Fillipino, Indian, Italian, Middle Eastern, Chinese, Japanese, Salvadorean and British. There are probably more but these are the ones with which I am familar.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Torakris: I'm assuming that you reconstitute/hydrate/soak the dry stuff till it puffs back up and then use it like the canned variety. It's not just grits, is it? lkm

Andiesenji: Wow! All those ethnic markets! The only problem is that I have to do so much research just to know half what I'm looking at when I go into one! Great fun, though! My sister lives in Florida and could always see the different lauchings. Bet where you live is beautiful too!

lkm

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RSincere: I like the sound of the soup suggestion. My husband adores Italian sausage. Do you remember any of the other ingredients? (Re: not needing a recipe! See above comment about my peasant/novice status!)

Hey, we're the same then, I'm a cooking novice/peasant too. I'm very wedded to recipes. I'm kind of sad about that cookbook; a couple months ago my mom helped me sell a bunch of cookbooks on eBay, and I think that one got in the mix accidentally even though it's my favorite crock pot cookbook. The only other ingredients I (think I) remember would be chicken stock and canned tomatoes!

Rachel Sincere
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Maybelline: When I try to send an e-mail from this forum, I'm told that that menu is disabled. What does one do to get it up and running, or does it have to do with some higher level of membership here, or?? lkm

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RSincere: On the "novice/peasant" side...I'm a recently retired high school English teacher who has seldom planned ahead or spent much time cooking. I have just "gotten it on the table." I'm having a good time planning and spending time in the cookbooks and on the web learning to "make real food." I've been given subscriptions to Food and Wine and also Saveur (both are out of my league but great fun to read!). The magazines led me here. Anyway, I'm enjoying cooking for the first time in years.

I've been checking out eBay for some of the cookbooks mentioned in the various threads. Plan to bid on a couple of Chinese cookbooks. You might see if you can find a copy of your lost cookbook there. lkm

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