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rlm

Frasca Food and Wine

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Fun Facts about Frasca

*This is Frasca Food and Wine's second week.

*They are only open for dinner right now.

*They are across from L’Atelier at 1738 Pearl Street.

*Their number is 303-442-6966.

*They were completely booked, so I sat at the bar.

*The friendly bartender Steve was very knowledgeable about their menu and pointed out the Salumi bar behind me where you can order Prosciutto San Daniele, Berina Bresaola, and Oldani Filsette (accompanied with Rafano and flatbread with olive oil and sea salt). You may also choose olives, spiced almonds/cashews, coleslaw, or “Frasca Cured Pickles and Torpedo Onions.”

*The bar stools are extremely tiny and uncomfortable, even according to the person next to me who was as skinny as I was in my 20’s. This was the only negative of the evening.

*Their wine list is not as comprehensive as Adega or Flagstaff House, but there are descriptive pages for the different varietals before the listings of available bottles.

*Sommelier Bobby is reportedly a Wine God.

*They use Riedel crystal.

*They have a nifty-looking wine display/storage area on the back wall.

*They had a warm corn soup on the menu made from “peaches and cream” corn that was light and blissful instead of heavy with cream.

*A few other first courses included Marinated Rishana Flora Potato Salad with Sliced Sweet Carrots, Celery, and Tarragon; Warm Hawaiian Big-Eye Tuna Salad with Deviled Egg Sauce; and Hudson Valley Fois Gras with Apricots, Armagnac, and Toasted Zucchini Bread.

*This may be washed down with Anselmi Tocai at 6 bucks a glass.

*Or Billecart Salmon Brut at 18 bucks a glass.

*Half-glasses are also available.

*There was a cutesy Italian name for the half-glasses that escapes me.

*The Butter Poached Ribeye of Ken Macy Beef with Roasted Fingerling Potatoes, Lobster Mushrooms, and Sweet Shallots was a simple preparation but surprisingly flavorful.

*The meat paired well with a recommended Paitin Barbera.

*Other second courses included Hand-Cut Tagliatelle with Sweet 100 Tomatoes, Basil Oil, and Tomato Broth; Russet Potato Gnocchi with Sweet Corn, Aged Sherry Vinegar and Brioche Crumbs; Pan Roasted Hawaiian Red Snapper Filet with Rishana Flora Red Cabbage, Valencia Onions, Green Beans, and Brown Butter Agrodolce; and Grilled Hudson Valley Moulard Duck Breast with Carmelized Torpedo Onions, Rhubarb Salad, and Duck Sugo.

*The last two highly recommended desserts I had at restaurants (Toasted Almond Cake at Luca D’Italia and the Peach Frappe with Biscotti at Frasca) were good but didn’t live up to the staffers’ hype. So perhaps you could walk off the duck liver and pasta you’ve just inhaled by making your way to the other side of Pearl to have some sticky toffee pudding from The Kitchen.

*Definitely check out Frasca. I was really surprised at how well everything was clicking in only their second week of business. Hopefully, they are on target like that every night.


Edited by rlm (log)

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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It looks great, but I don't understand their web site design. Rolling over things turns my cursor into a hand, indicating a link, but the links don't do anything that I can detect. I see that some rollovers change the center area into caption, but is that it? No more details available inside?

I feel clueless.

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It looks great, but I don't understand their web site design. Rolling over things turns my cursor into a hand, indicating a link, but the links don't do anything that I can detect. I see that some rollovers change the center area into caption, but is that it? No more details available inside?

I feel clueless.

If I were to guess, I'd say that you understand their website just fine, but it isn't working so good. It didn't work any better for me.


Fred Bramhall

A professor is one who talk's in someone else's sleep

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Robin, thanks for the fun facts! I'm excited to eat there. There's not much French Laundry lineage around these parts.

Did you have any salumi? Did you notice if they make any themselves? (Google says Oldani Filsette is a salami made in St Louis - interesting, and the others are obviously from Italy.) I love cured meats. Maybe even cured pickles, whatever they are. I sure like cured cucumbers. Did you notice where Ken Macy beef is from? Did you steal a menu or take notes? :biggrin: What are the prices like?

As for the web site, I assumed it was a soft opening kind of thing. They got something up in time for opening and more will come later.

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I did not have any salumi, although I definitely will next time. There are a few seats at the salumi bar. Yes, Steve said Oldani Filsette is from the Italian "Hill" area of St. Louis.

I asked if I could have a copy of the menu and Steve obliged. He said they print new ones daily.

The salumi platter is $12, with extra choices at $4.

First courses range from $5 for the corn soup to $15 for the fois gras.

Second courses start at $16 for the tagliatelle and go to $28 for the Ken Macy ribeye.

I didn't ask about Mr. Macy, although their menu states at the bottom, "Frasca proudly works with Colorado's greatest farmers." My Google search gave me two entries for a Ken Macy on the Wyoming Board of Agriculture. The third was a link to a Macy's "Texas Beef" t-shirt. The height of fashion, I'm sure.


Edited by rlm (log)

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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What are the prices like?

FWIW, here's what a foodie friend emailed me:

"I ate there the second night and it was, of course, fantastic. But eat before you go or bring your line of credit.""


"Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you like and let the food fight it out inside." Mark Twain

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I was going to wait until we went back to eat at Frasca again before I posted, because a) that is what the true reviewers, like peppered palate, do and b) I meant to take a menu but I forgot and I could not remember all the dishes. Now that Robin has been kind enough to post most of the menu and we really enjoyed dinner, I'll go ahead and post.

We went last Saturday night, they had only been open a week and a half, and the place was, indeed packed. Apparently the entirety of Boulder has been long awaiting anything with a tinge of the French Laundry. And to be clear, it really is only a tinge. Bobby Stuckey, who recently passed the master sommelier exam and was written up in Wine Spectator because of it, was at FL for a short time. Prior to coming to Boulder, he was at the Little Nell in Aspen for many years. Lachlan Patterson "something I'm forgetting" was in charge of the cheese course at FL and also did some cooking there too. The duo have been looking for a space to call home for over a year before nabbing the spot that used to be the Corner Gourmet and prior to that, a bakery -- the Daily Bread, I think. While waiting to find a space Bobby and Lachlen hosted a few dinners at Mateo and fooled around in their kitchen on the weekends.

The space is nice, black laquer chairs, pale green wall in the back, plate glass windows give you a great view out onto Pearl and a great view in to the diners and the salumi station. There is a glass wine wall ( but no black suited women on bungee cords a la Aureole in Las vegas, darn). Two tops along the back wall are a little close together but they must have put in some pretty high quality sound proofing because even though it was very crowded (including several table with young children -- why, oh why, do people do that??), we were able to converse quite nicely.

I don't know if he can keep it up, but Bobby is working the room incredibly hard. He is great with names and faces, discusses the menu and wine list in detail without seeming pretentious or condescending, and really gets the dinner off to a good start . .you want to like this place.

There were four of us. we started with a plate of the salumi and some olives while we mulled over the menu and wine list. It was obvious that the salumi was not home smoked, but of a very high quality -- particulary the air dried braseole and the salumi. We were seated by the slicing station (which also serves as the plating area for the desserts -- kind of a turn off) and you could watch the preparer at work. There are also seats at the slicing station, so in addition to eating at the bar, you can also have dinner with the slicing guy. The salumi plate at $12 was a very large plate of meat, more than enough for the four of us to nibble on. The bread was a little slow in arriving but it was tasty -- I believe from the former Daily Bread baker.

I started with the foie gras encrusted in crushed pistachio, it is a pate style version rather than a roasted torchon. The zucchini bread that accompanied it was pretty bland but the apricots were perfect. Mr. H had the tuna with the deviled egg dressing and it was incredible -- ahi grade tuna that was just ever so lightly seared and a dressing that indeed tasted exactly like the curried yolk filling of deviled eggs -- in a good way. Other couple had the poached egg salad and the tomoto salad. The poached egg salad had jicama and other pleasant taste treats, but I prefer a french bistro salad with lardon and a runny poached egg myself. This salad was a little too timid.

I had the pulled shoulder of pork for my main course, which came in a huge bowl and was very tender and juicy. Mr. H had the fois gras as a main. Others had the swordfish -- disappointing here, just a little too overcooked and the gnocchi which

was some of the best gnocchi I have ever had.

We had a lime tart for dessert (5$) and affogato -- homemade gelato that is doused with a shot of espresso. You can get this at any gelato place in Italy and it is one of my favorite desserts.

The wine list is plenty is not huge but has a nice slection -- I wish they would not have the cutesy names for the different categories -- you know like the Bold and Beautiful etc etc. but they have put together a nice selection and the mark ups are really reasonable, around 50%! I'll check with Mr. and repost as he went to liquormart the next day to purchase two of the wines that we had, a 2001 Bell Crozes Hermitage and a 2001 Austrian Riesling, and exclaimed in the aisle that they were not much less than what was one the menu.

The menu that Robin posted is already different than the one we had, so I guess they are going to change quicker than the every six weeks that Stuckey was claiming.

I have not been to L'Atelier so I don't know if there is a comparison there, but this is the best Boulder dining experience we have had and considering that they have only been open for two weeks, it is likely that they will continue to refine the menu further (and Mr. H says, raise the prices . but I'm not sure I agree with him.)

I'm not sure what Katezenjammy's friend was hinting at, we though the portions were quite sufficient and the prices in line for the "fine" dining experience that it was.

Ken Macy beef is from Greeley,CO. It is natural beef but not organic. We get meet from another Greely ranch, the Double J, which is similar in quality and the way the cattle is raised.

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If anyone is interested, Boulder Wine Merchant is co-hosting a dinner at Frasca on August 31.

Robert Weil Wine Dinner at Frasca

You are invited to join us for an evening of pleasure on Tuesday, August 31st at 7pm as we co-host a special Frasca/Robert Weil Wine Dinner. This event offers an ideal occasion to experience the resources and talents the Frasca team brings to the subject of food and wine. Bobby Stuckey M.S., of Frasca is a self-described German wine addict. He is credited with developing the first extensive German and Austrian wine list in Napa when he introduced it to French Laundry.

Chef Lachlan MacKinnon-Patterson will prepare a special menu for the occasion (to be announced). We will showcase the 2003 Rieslings from Robert Weil, one of Germany’s top producers, plus other gems from around the world. Cost for the whole experience – the great food, the wines, tax, gratuity, plus the unmatched camaraderie and gustatory ecstasy is just $75 per person. Seating is very limited.

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I was going to wait until we went back to eat at Frasca again before I posted, because a) that is what the true reviewers, like peppered palate do.

I normally never visit, much less review a restaurant until it's been open at least a month -- usually longer. Frasca, I have to admit, was an exception, but only because I'm writing a story on them for Sunset, which runs in January and my copy deadline is today because my globetrotting editor is in France the whole month of September. So, I had dinner there last night, and despite tight quarters, those horrific bar stools (which are actually not the bar stools Bobby ordered, and you will see vastly new and improved stools shortly, which is a good thing because my butt was sliding all over them), curved cutlery that won't lie properly on the plates, and inexplicably bright lighting, I will go out on a limb and proffer that this was the single most extraordinary dinner I've eaten all year -- and the service was seamless. We had the salumi plate, which was, as Amy said, certainly ample enough to satiate four, although two of us quite easily devoured every last niblet. The pork pate was exquisite, the lamb, despite its Colorado origin, actually tasted of lamb, which means it was gamey (as I think lamb should be), and the shaved leg of pork literally flew me to the moon. We lingered at the bar after dinner and sipped a lovely camomile-infused grappa. Bryan Moscatello was there with his wife having dinner, as well -- as was half of Boulder.

There are very few restaurant that I frequent because I want to (and not because I'm obligated by virtue of the written word), and undeniably, Frasca is one of those restaurants. In a word? Brilliant.


-Midson-

A gourmet who thinks of calories is like a tart, who looks at her watch

-James Beard-

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what does "frasca" mean? or are they trying to subliminally attract fans of fresca?

amy, i suspect what friend of katzenjammy (serial backer-outer-from egullet outings) is getting at is that those who do not have fat wallets may wish to have their stomachs partially filled beforehand so as to avoid penury via a full meal at frasca. but from robin's menu post it sounds like their prices aren't that much more than those at luca d'italia. one could theoretically be at only $21 before tax and tip for the cheapest app and entree. when you consider, that thanks to a moment of insanity, i paid almost as much for mediocre sushi on the hill last afternoon, that doesn't seem very bad at all. i could imagine a good 3 course meal there, inclusive of tax and tip, at <$40 per person. of course, that's not including wine. maybe $50 per person if you only drink one glass of wine each (which is what mrs. jones and i usually do). do they have a good selection of wines by the glass?

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I do not know the answer to the wines by the glass question. I agree with Mongo's assessment that you can easily walk out of Frasca well sated for under $40 pp w/o wine and probably closer to $50 with a glass of wine if you avoid the Ken Macy beef entree (but hearing Robin's desription, you may not want to). Even if you order a bottle, because he has kept the mark up so reasonable, you don't have to feel like you are being gauged. As Robin noted, there is also a good selection of 1/2 bottles too.

I forgot to ask Bobby about the name of the restaurant but I do know the inspiration for many of the items that appear on the menu comes from the Friuli region of Italy, in the north east corner of the country -- major city is Trieste bordering the adriatic and slovenia. This region has varied influences for its cuisine and thus, while Frasca is an "Italian" restaurant, there is no red sauce involved. That's what I know.

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Actually, I was referring to half-glasses rather than half-bottles in my original post. They offer a half-glass "tasting portion" for any of their wines-by-the-glass, which is a great option if you'd like to enjoy different wines with each course but you don't want to get "snackered" or spend lots of dinero.

Lachlan Patterson "something I'm forgetting"

Lachlan MacKinnon-Patterson, according to the business card I picked up at the front.

Easily one of the best meals I've had in a while.


“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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You all have me intrigued--I just made a reservation for Labor Day weekend.


Fred Bramhall

A professor is one who talk's in someone else's sleep

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The Italian name for the tasting glasses is "tajut."

Had another meal here and it was still pretty close to perfect (even though it was "entertaining" trying to get a ride home on CU-CSU weekend). Menu was quite similar, but had been tweaked a bit.

I had the Lalande Sauvignon Blanc (7) with the Warm Hawaiian Big-Eye Tuna Salad with Deviled Egg Sauce (13) and mr. rlm had the Shallot Soup (5) with the same wine. The salumi platter was once again calling my name, but I felt compelled to try the tuna Amy had described (so glad I did).

Then we had glasses of Paitin Barbera and Betts & Scholl Grenache. I had the bowl of Warm Long Family Farm Shaved Leg of Pork with Peaches (18) and mr. rlm had the Ribeye that I ordered on the last visit. I really didn't expect to enjoy the pork as much as I did, especially after seeing a non-fussy-looking, big bowl of shredded pork plopped down in front of me. This succulent pork did NOT require a heavy sauce, potatoes, or any of the other usual suspects to make it sing.

For dessert, we split chocolate gelato and the chocolate torte (much better together).

I'm so happy I don't have to drive to Aspen or even Denver for food like this. I hope they keep this up.


“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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Another successful dinner at Frasca . . I swear, we have no financial or other connection to the place. It continues to be jam packed ,although I was able to call on Wednesday and get a reservation for Thursday evening at 8:15, and the service is showing a little stress because of it. We had an 8:15 reservation but were not seated until closer to 8:45 because the folks at our table were lingering over dessert (still the weakest part of the meal). The host was profusely apologetic and comped us glasses of wine while we waited and we wound up at a "better" table by the window because those patrons vacated earlier.

It was much louder than our first visit because of the overflow crowd at the bar . I think the bar area has become quite the scene for what young urban hispters we have in Boulder. As a result and because our server was quite rushed, I missed his description of the Italian Tokay wine that was also comped to us at the start of the meal.

We nibbled on a plate of the salumi until our appetizers came . . house salad, me and my foie gras with a glass of ?, again, I could not hear the waiter and took his reco on a not quite sauterne that was delicious. One diner had the lamb relish, a kind of warmed picadillo served in a very large bowl (they have a thing about serving small things in huge bowls), and Andy had an heirloom tomato salad that was outstanding, the tomatoes had been blanched and skinned (I groan thinking about the prep time involved), so the salad was slightly warmed.

Main courses, two had slow roasted lamb, tender and shredded, I had the gnocchi, this time it sat on a bed of beet greens, and our fourth had the handmade tagliatelle with a lemon, corn, cream brodo -- very fresh and flavorful. The dish was scented with lemon and the corn taste came through, the cream was not heavy at all.

Dessert for me was a banana panna cotta served in a glass with banana bread. When it first arrived, it looked like a plate of milk and cookies and I was not sure what was in the glass until I stuck my spoon in and realized that it was, indeed, the banana flavored panna cotta. A nice cheese plate for 11 with a very odd red pepper jelly that we did not care for but the waiter insisted that some folks devour.

To sum up why I like this place and will keep going back. The food is creative and innovative (next time I will move off the foie gras and try a different app. this time they had a plate of green eggs and ham that someone should have orderd) and yet at the same time grounded in tradition and well executed.

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An interesting evening at Frasca. We had an 8:30 reservation for three on Saturday night. We arrived at 8:20, the place was packed, they told us it would be about 10 minutes, we told them we would wait outside. I checked in 15 minutes later, they again assured us that they knew where we were and would find us soon. 10 minutes later another employee came out to see who we were, offered to buy us drinks because of the wait. At 8:55 we still had no drinks, went inside and I got a bit irate with Bobby because they had obviously lost track of us.

We were seated at 9:00 and Bobby proceeded to spend the rest of the evening turning our experience around, and he was very successful at it. He bought me a glass of the tokai, my wife a glass of Champagne (I don't remember what), and my BIL a tequila.

We had the Salumi, the prosciutto, coppa and brasaola were all very good, served with a delicious horseradish sauce called Rafano and grissini that seemed to be house made.

I had 1/2 order of the potato gnocchi with beet vinaigrette, excellent texture and combination of flavors--loved it. Mary had the duck pate which was a soft untraditional texture--it was molded with a spoon like sorbet, topped with simple applesauce. She wasn't wild about the texture--I liked it. The green salad was unremarkable, but fine.

I thought all 3 entrees were very good. I had the butter poached ribeye with roasted potatoes, leeks and shallots, Mary had the shaved pork and BIL had poached swordfish with turnip, coconut slaw and thyme sauce. The chef's style seems to favor a delicate poaching process for meats that traditionally would be cooked with some form of searing or caramelization, and the flavor of the meat really comes through this way. I was surprised at how much I enjoyed his method.

Bobby bought me a glass of a 2000 super tuscan that was great, he brought my wife a sample of a single malt style rye, and a single pueblo Mescal for my BIL. He stopped at the table after almost every course arrived to check in and chat with us, offering up tidbits of info about the food or beverage. He sent his digestif expert over with glasses of Amaro for all of us after dessert. He completely won us over. With his expertise, and charm, not just his free booze.

I had hot chocolate with coconut mousse and housemade marshmallows for dessert--very rich, and very good.

It was an excellent meal, the best I've had in Boulder ever.


Fred Bramhall

A professor is one who talk's in someone else's sleep

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best I've had in Boulder ever

What?! Better than the "award winning" Lucca Lucca? Surely not! :biggrin:

There was an article on Frasca in yesterday's Daily Camera in the Business section:

Fresh Kids on the Block


“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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Since I don't want to incur the wrath of rlm (q.v., Mizuna thread), I am going to Frasca. That's right, your friendly neighborhood eG theoretical chemistry grad student is hitting the big time. I'm going with the Ma and Pa to celebrate my Grandma's birthday next Saturday.

But, I have a couple questions for rlm, or whomever, about Frasca, since their menu isn't online. First, one of the party is vegetarian (and I am often as well). Are there good options for a veggie, or should we move the location? I doubt they'd start a restaurant in Boulder without some, but better safe.

Second, any recommendations on the recent menu?

Third, anticipating the meal, anyone want to contribute to TheMatt's "I'm a poor grad student" fund so I can go back again?


TheMatt

Learning just means you were wrong and they were right. - Aram

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Matt, we may be going this week again if we can get a table at a reasonable hour, so I can update you if the menu's changed. The anniversary is this week, but we've both started new jobs recently and our schedules are a little wonky.

On the copy of the menu I have, there are several veggie-friendly items:

Tagliatelle (tomatoes, basil oil, tomato broth)

Risotto (porcini mushrooms, lemons, onions)

Gnocchi

Corn soup

Tomato salad

Potato salad

When I was in college, I didn't even attempt anything more expensive than Taco Bell unless someone else was paying. That whopping $4.25/hr work-study job just didn't go very far. :biggrin: I only enrolled in "Math for Poets" (a.k.a. College Algebra), so I don't think I'd ever attempt something like theoretical chemistry. So "good on ya," Matt.


“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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Okay, Matt, the menu I had this week has similar items on it, only with different preparations. The Tagliatelle now is served with a Sugar Pie Pumpkin "Brodo" and the Risotto is with Tocai Friulano Cucumbers and Butterscotch Melon Vinaigrette. Some of the combinations sound odd, but they end up tasting magical. There is also a Hawaiian Bass Fillet, Pork Loin (not shaved this time and served with razor-thin slices of apples, leeks, and a smidgen of "horseradish broth"), Mint Brioche Crusted Long Family Farm Lamb Leg, and the ribeye mainstay (only I don't remember it being served with chanterelles before, and Ken Macy isn't mentioned on the menu this time).

Starters included Roasted Anjou Pear, Valencia Onion Soup, Soft Boiled Hedgerow Farm Hen Egg Salad, Chanterelle Mushroom Strudel, Lamb Relish, a Pork Pate, and, of course, the Salumi.

We both had the Hot Chocolate dessert that Fred mentioned. Too rich to finish, but very good. It is similar to what my mother makes and calls "Chocolate Gravy" (sounds less fancy than Frasca's menu description).

Service was good, but we weren't as crazy about our main server this time (granted, the one on the last trip was exceptional). When the wines for the main course were brought out for a taste while I was still attempting to enjoy my bubbly, I made a comment about it. This was followed by an explanation about how “actually champagne is an excellent palate cleanser and Bobby has us use it between our tastings on Saturdays.” Well, boo-ya for you, but I’d rather not use my $18 glass of Billecart as a palate cleanser. I’d rather enjoy it uninterrupted, but thank you for the insight, Robert Parker. :biggrin: I think it bugged me more after I'd already left the restaurant and thought about it.

Overall, it was a wonderful trip again. They were quite busy for a Monday, but we arrived a little early and were promptly seated.


“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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Next time rlm, give us some *details* please. Sheesh ;) Man, I go to a restaurant and one hour later I'm usually like: "I had fish and soup...I think".

Well, my guess is my Pa will get the tagliatelle, but we'll see. My mother, the pork loin, my Grandma, the rib eye. Et moi? I don't know.

Oh, and I'm sure one of us (maybe me) will get that Hot Chocolate. When we do, I'll tell my mother, from Poplar Bluff, MO, that you called it "chocolate gravy". She's mentioned that from her childhood and I'm guessing this'll be a bit more haute than what she is used to. I'll file a report on the weekend.

Now, if we can only get them to hire a webmaster. I mean, Radek has his menus up, these guys need the same.


Edited by TheMatt (log)

TheMatt

Learning just means you were wrong and they were right. - Aram

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Now, if we can only get them to hire a webmaster. I mean, Radek has his menus up, these guys need the same.

As a web designer who's worked on several restaurant sites (including a couple which would be simpatico with Frasca's mission), a fixed menu online is not necessarily desirable. Any chef or kitchen committed to "local, seasonal, sustainable" knows, you don't always have a window into what's going to land in your lap that day, that week, that month.

I think it's better to show a sampling of the menu, in general, of things that might be presented, so people have an idea of the kitchen's diversity, than it is to promise berries for dessert, not knowing that an early frost will compromise your ability to deliver. (Let the people who want strawberries in December go to IHOP.)

Hey, recommend me for their web site!

:biggrin:


Edited by tanabutler (log)

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Next time rlm, give us some *details* please.  Sheesh ;)  Man, I go to a restaurant and one hour later I'm usually like:  "I had fish and soup...I think"...

I'd like to say my memory is iron-clad, but I will share that if you say "pretty-please," they will give you a copy of the paper menu.

Oh, and I'm sure one of us (maybe me) will get that Hot Chocolate.  When we do, I'll tell my mother, from Poplar Bluff, MO, that you called it "chocolate gravy".  She's mentioned that from her childhood and I'm guessing this'll be a bit more haute than what she is used to. 

Theirs is closer to a soup consistency than gravy, and yes, it's a little more haute than mom's, but it's warm and comforting and makes me feel five again.


“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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As a web designer who's worked on several restaurant sites (including a couple which would be simpatico with Frasca's mission), a fixed menu online is not necessarily desirable. Any chef or kitchen committed to "local, seasonal, sustainable" knows, you don't always have a window into what's going to land in your lap that day, that week, that month.

I think it's better to show a sampling of the menu, in general, of things that might be presented, so people have an idea of the kitchen's diversity, than it is to promise berries for dessert, not knowing that an early frost will compromise your ability to deliver. (Let the people who want strawberries in December go to IHOP.

I suppose, but I've always wondered, unless menus are handwritten or spoken (which they might be at Frasca) or on a tray like desserts, they're usually typeset on a computer and I've known some restaurants who do them in an office on site. So, why can't the menu be uploaded by SFTP each time it is changed? I can think of ways to script it via Perl, PHP, Ruby, or LaTeX->HTML, and then you'd have "realtime" menus on a website. Jus' wonderin'...


TheMatt

Learning just means you were wrong and they were right. - Aram

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Even elementary school kids eat at Frasca before da grad student:

http://www.bouldernews.com/bdc/food/articl...3246831,00.html

Somehow I can't remember going to Strings or the Rattlesnake Club in my elementary days. (I'm trying to recall the hot places in the 80s. Need Warren Byrne or someone in here...)


TheMatt

Learning just means you were wrong and they were right. - Aram

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