Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Fresh Pork


Recommended Posts

How long should you be able to keep pork shoulder in the fridge before using it?

I have a 2 day old pork shoulder that strikes me as a bit off. (It was wrapped in butchers wrap, not prepackaged in plastic on one of those trays.) I will take it back to the store tomorrow, but am I being overly cautious? Or was it hanging out at Whole Foods too long?

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

Link to post
Share on other sites

If it smells off after only two days in your fridge, I would take it back. Unless your fridge is running too warm, two days is certainly a reasonable amount of for it to keep. I have kept pork butt for more than that with no problem. But then, I keep my fridge pretty cold.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

Link to post
Share on other sites

You're right about keeping the fridge cold. I think lots of them aren't cold enough. I keep a thermometer in mine so I know it's not that. I was going to take it back anyway, but I wanted some moral support. It's not stinking and slimy, just not quite seeming fresh.

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

Link to post
Share on other sites

Based on limited experience here:

I've noticed that things wrapped in butcher's paper seem to give an "off" smell to them--not sure if the paper just absorbs liquid more or what. But I get pork from a butcher in downtown Dallas sometimes and have noticed an off smell to it when I unwrap it after a few days in the fridge. Usually once I throw out the paper, rinse the meat and pat it dry, it doesn't have that smell. Only once did it seem to permeate the meat, but that was after a considerably longer time in the fridge. Wound up throwing it out after cooking and taking a bite. I'm stubborn that way, though. I usually try to use the meat as soon as possible or transfer it to different wrapping when I get it home. Not to try to persuade you from returning meat with a funny smell, just the butcher paper distinction gave me that thought.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I once had some pork hocks that smelled a bit off, so I stuck them in a brine for a few days (which was my original intention, I just forgot about them), then braised them for a few hours and served with lentils. I think the hocks had been sitting in the fridge for 3 days before I brined them. They turned out incredibly delicious and I didn't get sick, so you could try that if you wanted.

"Gentlemen, you can't fight in here. This is the War Room!"

-Presiden Muffley, Dr. Strangelove

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometime fresh pork can smell downright gamey. My theory is that factory farmed pork has created the expectation that fresh meat smells like nothing. I guess it depends on what the animals were fed, what breed they were,etc. The portugese Pork O Rama in my town sells lots of fresh pork at great prices, but their product has a distinctive pork funk, as opposed to the big chain grocery pork stores. Cook the heck out it after an acidic marinade...?

Link to post
Share on other sites
"A bit" off? I would scrub it up and roast it right away. That'll kill anything clinging to the exterior. I think they're going to look at you funny if you bring it back three days after you bought it.

But maybe not.

I bought it late in the day on the 17th, meaning to but didn't get to cook it the next day. I went to do cook it on the 19th (last night) and am returning it today. When I've bought chicken (which I never let hang over), I had the gap from packing to expiration go longer than that!

As for cooking it up, I intended to cook part and freeze the rest. The only reason I discovered its poor condition is that I had scissored off the web-like sleeve the deboned roast was in so as to cut it in half. (Even if roasting the whole thing, I always take off that awful web and retie with twine. BTW: Who invented that web? Yuck.

Edited to add: the reason I took a big wiff was that the meat felt oddly slimy as I was cutting it. This isn't the first time I've bought a large roast and cut it up myself, but it's the first time it hasn't seemed fresh.

Edited by Mottmott (log)

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

Link to post
Share on other sites
...I've noticed that things wrapped in butcher's paper seem to give an "off" smell to them...

I also notice that if I don’t rewrap deli meats in something else right after I buy them they don’t taste quite as fresh just a day or so later. I just think that the paper is too permeable. It doesn’t keep out the refrigerator odors and oxygen that can quickly alter the flavor of the fat and protein in meats.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...