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restaurants in Paris for mid february


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I will be in Paris mid february,need the advise on where to go between Au Violon d´Ingres and Guy Savoy,

between Le Divellec and La Cagouille,

and which of the following for lunch:

L´Epin Dupin,La Maxence,La Bamboche

Gracias

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I went to Violin d'Ingres 2-1/2 years ago and Guy Savoy maybe 18 years ago. Violin d'Ingres has nothing to do with the Man Ray photograph. I would take Guy Savoy.

La Coguille used to be my favorite seafood restaurant in Paris while Le Divellec I never could get to. I advised someone recently to stick to the most simple preparations at La Cagouille. It is better as a lunch place. The other addresses you mentoned I have never been to. M. Le Divellec must be quite old by now.

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I've eaten in only one of your choices and that meal was well over a dozen years ago. That's too far back to make a valid recommendation. I will note that David Van Leer, who was the chef at La Bamboche, is now at Le Maxence which would make me choose Le Maxence over the other two. That and a taste of his rillettes de lievre au chocolate or what ever the dish we tasted at the Salon du Chocolate was called. The hint of bitter chocolate or cocoa powder added a depth of flavor and was not at all an assault on my tastebuds. Bitter chocolate with meat goes back to the Mayans, or Aztecs anyway. It's just not too common in western European cooking.

Both Guy Savoy and Violin d'Ingres have been of interest to me, but they have different appeal. Savoy is certainly more expensive and I think the clear cut star of the two if price is no object. The only negative thing I've heard about Savoy is that it can be smoky and that includes cigar smoke.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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I would support Robert's comments about La Cagoulle, stick to the simple dishes plus don't expect much from the desserts. I would only suggest it as an option for Sunday as they open 7/7.

Can't help you with the rest, but if Guy Savoi is on your radar then you must read the terrific write up by Jake in the "Paris Trip Reports" thread. This link http://www.egullet.com/cgi-bin/topic.cgi?forum=11&topic=36 should get you there.

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I have unique memories of our meal at le Divellic some 15 years ago. The food was excellent. the service was impeccable except for one flaw, I was handed a menu without prices and thought it was some peculiar affectation. We only found out after dinner that our 12 year old daughter somehow got the menu with prices. What I distinctly recall was that the exchange rate was hovering around 10 francs to the dollar and although we had no plans for a good meal in Paris, after stuffing ourselves on bargain foie gras in the Perigord we decided to hit a starred place in Paris and make the most of the exchange. We picked le Divellic because I had recently read an article about the restaurant with several enticing recipes and we had not had much fish in the Perigord. It was early in September and we were traveling with rather informal summer clothes. Thus I recall going to dinner in a cotton summer jacket and that our twelve year old daughter refused to wear anything but jeans. the temperature had taken a precipitous tumble that morning and every other male in the room was wearing an elegant dark suit, as people did in starred restaurants in the eighties. There were no other children in the dining room. Nevertheless, we were given a wonderful table and with the notable exception of the menu--maybe our daughter looked better able to afford dinner than I did in my cheesey summer suit--service was wonderfully gracious and elegant.

Guy Savoy has two Michelin stars. There seems to be widespread agreement that it is under rated. Clearly you've done some homework to narrow your choices down and one man's subjective choices may seem odd to another. In fact, the short list I might make on a Monday, may be very different from one I make on Friday. I am curious to know what you are looking for in this meals. I would understand a reluctance to open yourself to yet more suggestions having already narrowed your choices. For me, where to eat in France is not the problem. It's which places will I have to give up. I sometimes envy those who can put away a grand lunch and dinner on the same day.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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I have dined at Violin...attractive, good service, didn't find cuisine to rave about although the reviewers have always thought otherwise. Guy Savoy's was a very refined experience w. excellent and kind service and interesting cuisine. I would give serious consideration to Patrick Pignol's Relais d'Auteuil [?sp] as I think this is an up and coming restaurant w. fabulous service & cuisine.

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