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Beaune restaurants and markets


al sharff
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We had a meal at Hostellerie de Levernois about eighteen months ago and thought it was incredibly boring. There were absolutely no 'wow' factors at all. Nothing was particularly bad, but how they got any Michelin stars is a mystery - but then again Don Alfonso on the Amalfi Coast has three, so anything is possible!

The most honest food we have eaten in this area was at a small restaurant in Chambolle-Musigny called Le Chambolle-Musigny Restaurant. Cheap, cheerful and very well-cooked local food.  

Roger McShane

Foodtourist.com

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Restaurants: Beaune and environs

Bernard Morillon

27, rue Maufoux

21200 Beaune

Phone: 03.80.22.35.48

Fax: 03.80.22.76.80

Bernard Morillon, located on the ground floor of the Hôtel Le Cep, has a reputation for being unwaveringly traditional (translation: much butter and cream), yet a recent dinner there showed a lighter hand than I would have expected. Really quite good, and the cheese service--along with that at Levernois--is one of the best around. Weakness: dreary wine list, full of lame négociant bottlings. The woman who runs the front of the house, by the way, looks like an opera star, and oozes charm and warmth.

Hostellerie de Levernois

21200 Beaune

Phone: 03.80.24.73.58

Fax: 03.80.22.78.00

This is about 5km southeast of Beaune proper in the hamlet of Levernois. Jean Crotet, formerly propriétaire of La Cote d'Or in Nuits-St.-Georges, moved his hotel-restaurant down here a few years ago. It's far and away the most luxurious and tranquil lodging for miles around, installed, as it is, in a bucolic parklike setting. The restaurant is quite good, though I sometimes question its two stars in Michelin (one might be a fairer assessment on most nights, and Michelin evidently agrees, as they just them docked them a star in the 2000 guide). Expensive by countryside standards, but not so expensive compared to Paris lodging.

Hostellerie du Vieux Moulin

Bouilland

21420 Savigny-les-Beaune

Phone: 03.80.21.51.16

Fax: 03.80.21.59.90

Tucked away another 10-12km into the woods back beyond Savigny-les-Beaune, Jean-Pierre Silva's restaurant-hotel is considerably more upscale than the neighborhood would suggest. Highly imaginative cooking (two stars in Michelin, which it deserves some nights if not others) and a very well-selected wine list, the latter helped out in no small part by the fact that his next-door neighbor is none other than Becky Wasserman-Hone, an American-born courtier en vin whose palate and portfolio of growers (which includes the likes of Denis Bachelet, Alain Burguet, Daniel Rion, Philippe Engel, et al) are legendary. The rooms are not expensive, by the way, though its middle-of-nowhere location makes it a less-than-perfect choice as a base of operations.

L'Écusson

place Malmédy

21200 Beaune

Phone: 03.80.24.03.82

Fax: 03.80.24.74.02

Young Jean-Pierre Senelet did a stint, I believe, as fish chef at Taillevent in Paris before opening his own place down here in Beaune, about two or three blocks from the train station. There used to be some inconsistency here, I'll admit (everything regrettably oversalted on one visit; bright, vivid flavors with interesting vinegar-laced, lightly acidulated sauces on the next), but he's at the top his game right now, at least based on three visits in the last 13 months, which were uniformly excellent. If you go, have him compose a surprise menu of his choosing. As he's buddies with many of the very best young growers (and tastes with them regularly) his list has both more depth and breadth than you would expect for a restaurant that's been around only for a decade or less. He had a Michelin star five years ago or so, if I remember correctly, lost it, and never got it back, a situation bordering on the scandalous, as, for my money, this is one of the very best restaurants in the area right now (though if someone wants to make the case for Moulin de Martorey, you might persuade me).

Le Jardin des Remparts

10, rue Hotel Dieu

21200 Beaune

Phone: 03.80.24.79.41

Back in 1992, Francois Millet, winemaker at Comte de Vogüé suggested I go here, but without supporting documentation from the latest Michelin or Gault-Millau, I didn't on that trip. Stupid me (just like these geeks who won't try a wine without a 90+ from the Speculator): it subsequently got some favorable writeups in G-M, and earned its first Michelin star in the '96 edition of the red guide. Moreover, I finally ended up trying it five years ago, then again the following July, again last September, and twice (!) this past April, and each time I've come away impressed. Not only is the food quite good, but the restaurant itself is very handsome: a beautifully renovated traditional bourgeois French home, brought smartly up to date with Italian halogen lighting, etc. The wine list needs a little work, but I'm confident that will come with time (fingers crossed).

Le Bénaton

25, rue du Faubourg-Bretonniere

21200 Beaune

Phone: 03.80.22.00.26

I finally tried this place two trips ago, since it had begun to gain some recognition in the French foodie press (e.g., Gault-Millau, etc.). Word-of-mouth, however, had been not so hot. My take on it: the food coming out of the kitchen is genuinely excellent, and whoever's back there actually knows what he's doing. But the service is amateurish at best (plates going to the wrong table, then "Who gets the veal?," once it finds its correct destination), and the wine list was without question the poorest I'd encountered in some time when I last visited 18 months ago: virtually nothing but third-rate négociant crap. However, when visiting Dominique Lafon last month, I noticed some of his wines boxed up and awaiting delivery to Le Bénaton, so I asked him if that was a sign that things were starting to look up in terms of their wine list, and he answered in the affirmative.

La Ciboulette

69, rue Lorraine

21200 Beaune

Phone: 03.80.24.70.72

Fax: 03.80.22.79.71

Bright, clean bistro serving bright, clean bistro fare. Extremely popular with locals, so book in advance. Some pleasant surprises on the wine list.

Le Gourmandin

8, place Carnot

21200 Beaune

Phone: 03.80.24.07.88

I used to consider this an excellent small bistro, serving traditional bistro fare, with some downright excellent choices to be found on the wine list. And while it's still not bad, it strikes me as a bit dispirited these days, likely as a result of Ma Cuisine (see below) having completely usurped its spot as best casual restaurant with excellent food and wine at reasonable prices. Le Gourmandin is owned by Jean Crotet of the deluxe Hostellerie de Levernois above.

Ma Cuisine

allée Ste.-Helene

21200 Beaune

Phone: 03.80.22.30.22

Fax: 03.80.24.99.79

Just off the place Carnot and opened by the same guy (Pierre Escoffier) who owns the Caves Ste.-Hélène wine shop, with which this new informal bistro shares its wine inventory. His vivacious wife, Fabienne, does the cooking, at #### wonderful cooking it is: closer to anything in the area to the Chez Panisse esthetic, i.e., take fresh, high-quality ingredients and use simple cooking preparations to showcase their inherent goodness. Wine list, as you would imagine, is far better than most. The most welcome addition to the Burgundy dining scene in a long time. And super-reasonably priced on top of it all. Reservations imperative!

Le P'tit Paradis

25, rue Paradis

21200 Beaune

03.80.24.91.00

This sunny and delightful, and minuscule, place is another new arrival. The food is quite good, and the people who run the place exceptionally warm and welcoming. I have heard that the reason the wine list is only so-so is that they just don't have the working capital to focus on that end of things just yet. Still, I'll drop in here anytime (but not without a reservation!).

Le Montrachet

21190 Puligny-Montrachet

Phone: 80.21.30.06

Fax: 03.80.21.39.06

Delightful hotel-cum-restaurant right on the square in Puligny. Rooms are attractive and no more than 贄 a night or so. The Michelin one-star restaurant is no slouch, and refreshingly informal. The wine list is decent, too, though starting to look pretty picked over, based on my last visit there.

La Bouzerotte

21200 Bouze-les-Beaune

Phone: 03.80.26.01.37

Fax: same as phone

About 6 or 7km outside of Beaune on the route de la Bouzaize. I had the best roast chicken of my life here in 1983, though La Bouzerotte has had its ups and downs in the interim. I had avoided it in recent years, as Burgundians whose judgments I trust had warned me away, saying that it simply wasn't what it used to be. As of July 1995, however, things apparently got back on track: Dominique Lafon (who knows a thing or two about taste) had been insisting since that date that it's back on form, apparently the result of new ownership, and has been strongly urging that I book a meal there ASAP. Unfortunately, all the locals had the same idea and a reservation was impossible to come by every time I made the attempt on subsequent trips to the area. Well, finally!!!, a couple of weeks ago I eventually got in. And it was worth the wait. Honest, forthright, "cuisine du terroir," but with higher culinary ambitions than that term might imply. Quite a number of choices, both in menus and on the à la carte side. Even some "luxury" ingredients such as foie gras and the like. Very informal and friendly. I can't vouch for the wine list, as I went with one of the new breed of "micro-négoce" who brought his own wine. By the way, there's a place nearby where some crazed Scotch fanatic (yes, a Frenchman, if you can believe it) does his own élevage of special small lots of single-malt scotch!

Moulin de Martorey

St.-Rémy

71100 Chalon-sur-Saone

Phone: 03.85.48.12.98

Fax: 03.85.48.73.67

On the southwestern outskirts of Chalon, making it a navigationally tricky 20-minute excursion from Beaune, you'll find this gorgeous converted mill, the original gears and ancillary machinery of which have been cleverly incorporated into the decor of the dining room. Truly modern cooking of an exceptionally high standard (one star in Michelin) and an excellent wine list. I really have to wonder what the Michelin inspectors are thinking when a place like this can't seem to rise above a one-star ranking, yet a place like Levernois--which is in no way any better--kicks back and receives two stars year-in and year-out (except for this year, as noted above). Also in Beaune are another couple of relatively new places (Les Tontons, and something else a few doors away that I'm forgetting) I can recommend, but they'll have to wait until I can dig out their business cards. Wait, I just located Les Tontons' business card. They are located at 22, Faubourg Madeleine, 21200 Beaune; phone: 03.80.24.19.64, fax: 03.80.22.34.07. Quite good cooking, with an adequate, if not great, wine list.

RESTAURANTS: The Cote de Nuits

Chateau de Gilly

21640 Vougeot

Phone: 03.80.62.89.98

Fax: 03.80.62.82.34

The latest entrant in the luxury sweepstakes in the area is a former Cistercian abbey with formal gardens. It's in kind of a funny spot, lying just east (about 2km) of the Route Nationale 74 (all the vineyards are to the west). But it is reasonably plush and, I believe, a member of the Relais & Chateax group. Recently someone told me that they have rooms in the 贄/night range, i.e., not just at the high end. The restaurant isn't bad either, though unapologetically traditional; unfortunately, when I was last there (three years ago), the wine list didn't show much effort or imagination. That might have changed, however, as Henri Jayer considers this one of his favorite places, and I'd like to think he'd not waste his time where the wine selection was abysmal, but you never know.

Les Millésimes

25, rue l'Église

21220 Gevrey-Chambertin

Phone: 03.80.51.84.24

Fax: 03.80.34.12.73

I love this place. In the past it has been criticized for inconsistency, but I think (or hope) that has largely been overcome. Michelin gives them one star, which I think is deserved. The Sangoy family (a couple of sone replaced dad in the kitchen since his untimely death a couple of years ago; mom and daughter run the dining room, another son Didier the cellar) has created a lovely ambience down in their cave-turned-dining room, a well-executed cuisine that draws equally from the traditional and from the contemporary, and a formidable wine list that is utterly staggering in its scope and depth. Seriously, it is the single finest list for Burgundy anywhere (though you'll pay dearly for mining its treasures), and that includes Taillevent, Troisgros, Georges Blanc,...you name it. Page after page, it presents a virtual who's who of the best small propriétaires-récoltants. They also have an informal bistro now, as well, just off the N79 that's OK at best, but nothing special. Still, some of the same wines are available here, although at lower prices than at the "big deal" restaurant.

Les Gourmets

8, rue Puits de Tet

21160 Marsannay-la-Côte

Phone: 03.80.52.16.32

Fax: 03.80.52.03.01

One of my newer restaurant entries in some time. Imaginative, contemporary cooking of a very high standard; in fact, I might even lump Joel Perreaut in with the likes of Gillot at Moulin de Martorey and Senelet at L'Écusson.

Aux Vendanges de Bourgogne

47, route de Beaune

21220 Gevrey-Chambertin

Phone: 03.80.34.30.24

Fax: 03.80.58.55.44

An even newer addition to my restaurant list. Informal bistro serving really well-executed traditional Burgunian fare. The wine list must have 50-75 different references, all from Gevrey, and mostly from the better small growers, listed in ascending order of price (since this was first written, I've been back, and I can now report that the list has gotten even better and now encompasses more than just the wines of Gevrey; moreover, the chef is strating to take some chances with touches like a Thai-influenced fish preparation, for example). A welcome addition to the dining scene here.

I'm not mentioning such obvious temples of gastronomy as the Michelin three-starred Lameloise in Chagny, as you likely already know about it. Hope this helps.

David Russell

Santa Barbara, CA

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sorry that we only will have 3 meals in the area.
Often the hard part is deciding which restaurants to skip. I note that David Russell writes about bistros with the same enthusiasm as he does about starred restaurants. I understand the concept of the Michelin stars respresenting just how far out of one's way it's worth going for a restaurant, but there are simple bistros whose pleasures I miss as much as the multistarred restaurants if I pass them by. Let me join Shaw (Fat Guy). David, that was a wonderful post even if it makes it hard to plan two days in Beaune.  

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

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  • 3 months later...

The Fall 2001 issue of Edward Behr's quarterly, The Art of Eating features Burgundy. Most of it focuses on Dijon and the places in the countryside and no restaurants in Beaune are mentioned. He does recommend Le Tast Fromages as a great cheese shop in Beaune. The Art of Eating, at ื a year for four 32 page journals is probably not everyone's cup of tea, but there's not much else quite like it--especially when he touches on a topic in which I have great interest.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

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I began subscribing a few months ago to the quarterly Bux mentioned.  The item did not appear to be readily available from London newsstands.  I found interesting (1) the article on epoisse, and (2) the "oeufs en meurette" recipe (eggs with, among other things, red wine and onions).  

As hinted at by Bux, though, the quarterly may not be a good fit for everybody.  For members who speak French, the magazine Gault-Millau from the guide company, the French version of "Saveurs" and the weekend edition of Figaro (with supplements) provide generally decent food coverage.

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The Art of Eating is probably worthy of its own thread and the focus of the quarterly is not at all limited to the food and wine of France. A cursory look at a list of past issues shows a roughly equal interest in Italian food and American food as well as French. I think it differs quite a bit from all the glossies including the better European food publications. The focus is more on the producers, the farmers, cheese makers and wine makers than on restaurants and things the normal tourist, or even the tourist on a dedicated gastronomic tour would run across. With that focus and without color photographs it may seem a bit "dry" to many. That and the price per page will certainly ensure it's not for everyone although those who find the publications designed for "everyone" are not for them, may find it very appealing. It gets quoted and referred to at eGullet.com from time to time. As it's such a non-commercial venture, I have no problem giving it a good plug. It carries no advertising and, for obvious reasons, the information in the articles is not viewable on the web site, but you can find out more about Ed Behr and his publication at www.ArtofEating.com

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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This is a tardy reply for David Russell and anyone who may have the info. my wife and I have been trying to get for several years. In the 1980s, there was a restaurant on the outskirts of Beaune called " Le Petit Truc" whose chef and owner was a very pretty and tempermental woman named Edith Remoissenet (married for a time to the negociant). She was a tad loony, which was obvious to anyone who ate there. She closed the restaurant ca. 1988, after which someone reported a sighting of her in a restaurant in Nuits-St. Georges. She made terrific escargots and jambon persille; also chicken with morilles and pistacio ice cream in a chocolate sauce. It was just a little place in a charming cottage which she ran with an iron fist and a whiplash tongue, but was our favorite little restaurant. Has anyone ever been there or heard anything about her? David, since you're clearly a true Beaune-head, maybe you can help relieve the long-time deprivation of my wife and myself, if such a possibility still exists.

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Robert,

Yes, I too remember Edith Remoissenet's little auberge and went there once or twice myself. An American friend of mine actually tried to buy the place, but he was never able to successfully negotiate a deal with Mme. Remoissenet, and he ended up coming back to this country, where he eventually started his own wine import company, bringing in--natch--French wines exclusively. I'm in reasonably frequent contact with my buddy, and I'll ask him if he has any idea whatever became of this gal (and her restaurant after she closed it).

David Russell

Santa Barbara, CA

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For Davec who asked about our restaurant experiences in Beaune.  Sorry I didn't post sooner as you imply that you may now be in France eating (I'm jealous).

We ate dinner at: L'Écusson , place Malmédy ,   21200 Beaune  Phone: 03.80.24.03.82

      Fax: 03.80.24.74.02 .

Casual place.  We started with raw salmon on a cucumber base and escargot in marrow bones with garlic confit, then sandre in a heavy cream sauce and a steak, cheese, finished with strawberries in a cassis sauce and rhubarb packets with ice cream.  Our notes say that the salmon was one dimensional and the snails were too salty, nice selection of local cheeses, and good deserts.  We drank a Santenay that was very smelly/sulphured but didn't feel that the restaurant would replace the wine if we commented.  Bill was about 750 FFR for two.  Felt the food was not exciting at all, very one dimensional throughout.  Not a place we'll return to.

Next day we had lunch at    Le Jardin des Remparts  10, rue Hotel Dieu   21200 Beaune                   Phone: 03.80.24.79.41

Our notes start off with "there is hope!"  We had a delightful time, good food.  

Started with a terrine of chicken breast and liver and a wonderful tartare of beef and oysters.  Then we both had dorade with olives and prunes (the combination worked).  Followed with veal kidneys and tongue and a rabbit filet over chopped rabbit and olives (my wife noted it was too salty).  A very good, a great, a reason we in the US fly to France, cheese course.  Desert of a baba and rose ice cream and a raspberry fluff with beet sorbet.  No notes on the wines, I don't think we selected anything special.   If I remember correctly the menu is the same at dinner.  About 1000 FFR for two.  I'd love to eat there again.

We also had lunch at     Ma Cuisine  allée Ste.-Helene   21200 Beaune   Phone: 03.80.22.30.22

Much like the review above describes it.  Casual restaurant with the specials on the black board.    Started with beef capriccio and croquet monsieur (my wife described it as grilled cheese on toast), followed with kidneys and blanchette of veal, finished with a strawberry gratin and a creme caramel.  Food was rustic, good, simple, but not complex flavors on the plate.  The wine was very good, but the prices seemed high over all.  About 570 FFR for two.   The kind of place I'd go back to, for the wines and the rustic cooking but I'd have to drag my wife back to because it's a little too one dimensional.              

Dinner at     Bernard Morillon  27, rue Maufoux   21200 Beaune     Phone: 03.80.22.35.48

(Yes we had more meals in Beaune than I originally anticipated) A fancy restaurant that just didn't go the whole way.  Started with foie gras and smoked salmon, then a lobster gratin for both of us, pigeon for both of us, a strawberry souffle and a chocolate sorbet.    Our notes say "not outstanding but very good".  I remember our reaction as we left the restaurant was that it had gotten tired (our second time there).  The staff often looked bored when presenting the plates, the food was good but nothing was great.  We went to some length with Madame (who looked as if her feet hurt) over how the pigeon should be cooked (saignant, medium rare) and when she present it rare she apologized that the kitchen sent it out that way.  I still can't understand why she didn't send it back in to be finished before it came to the table.  It's not on my list for a  repeat visit.  About 1725 FFR for two.

We looked at the menu for    Le Gourmandin   8, place Carnot   21200 Beaune

 Phone: 03.80.24.07.88   and didn't see anything out of the ordinary or very interesting.  Very much the standard dishes of the region.  May be good but the menu didn't entice us to give it a try.

Al Sharff

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  • 4 weeks later...

Sorry for the delay, but my friend who had tried to buy Edith Remoissenet's « Le Petit Truc » was in France and Spain over the holidays and only today was able to get back to me. Here's what he had to say:

"Concerning Edith, her restaurant was called 'Le Petit Truc, and you will recall (maybe) that when S_____ [my friend's now wife] and I were living in Beaune 1987-88, Edith went broke, and we were actually at the notaire's office the day before our wedding bidding on the little restaurant.  Hubert [de Montille, a Volnay-based <I>vigneron</I> who also happened to be a Dijon attorney] was our advisor, and he held up his hand for me to stopbidding at about 750,000frs (it included the building and a fairly large garden/orchard).  He knew exactly what the deal was worth as he was Edith's best friend and advisor.  Needless to say, we are glad not to have been trapped into running a country auberge.  Edith has supposedly moved out of the region, according to Etienne [de Montille, Hubert's son]."

Hope this helps.

Davidn Russell

Santa Barbara, CA

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  • 7 months later...

i would second the praise for jardin des ramparts, i loved it and sent my non-foodie parents who still talk about it!

I also tried bernard morillon and could see why it lost its star, poor service, uninspiring food, kitchen arguing etc! They did bing a complementary glass of wine at one point to try and make amends which was totally different to what we were drinking, further adding to a generally bizarre evening!

i'm booked into Le Montrachet at the end of sept so glad to see that's looking good, i'd like to visit some of the producers in the area does anyone have any advice as to houses that are agreeable to visits?

cheers

Gary

you don't win friends with salad

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  • 7 months later...

Could somebody tell me about public (food) markets in or around Beaune? Will be there Saturday PM to Wednesday AM. Is there a weekly Sunday market?

Many thanks!

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According to Wells' The Food Lover's Guide to France, there's a major market in Chagny on Sundays. It's 16 km from Beaune to Chagny. Market days rarely change, but this guide is over 15 years old. Beaune has a Saturday market, but these are often not an all day affair and you may miss the best of it, most of it, or all of it.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

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If my recollection is correct the Saturday market in Beaune continues until mid-afternoon, especially at this time of year with the white asparagus and morels in full season. It is definitely worth your effort to get there. My biggest regret last time we were there was that we were staying in a hotel and had nowhere to cook.

Ruth Friedman

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My biggest regret last time we were there was that we were staying in a hotel and had nowhere to cook.

But an afternon at the market can sure when one's appetite for dinner and is a great reminder of what's in season.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Bux,

Thanks. We'll definitely try to get to Chagny.

Unfortunately, we don't get into Beaune until ~1500 hrs on Saturday, so we probably won't be there in time for the Beaune market.

I appreciate everyone's help.

Mark

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  • 9 months later...
This thread looks very rich and helpful, but is a few years old.  Do you think the Jardin des Ramparts would still be a safe bet, 2 years later?

From Notes from a recent trip.

Regarding Beaune, we have eaten at Ma Cuisine 3 times.  The first time we ordered the prix fixe and were also disappointed.  Some wine makers told us they do that for the tourists and we should order the Burgundy specialties (such as Jambon Persille) off the menu.  The next two times we ate there we ordered off the menu and it was wonderful.  Les TonTon was also a favorite of ours and also as empty as when you went.  We have eaten there twice and are always pleasantly surprised.  Consider yourself lucky that Le Jardin des Remparts was closed.  You dodged a bullet.  We also enjoyed La Ciboulette for traditional Burgundian fare.

You might want to get more of an explanation from sumac. From my conversations with her, I would take her to be a knowledgeable and discerning diner.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

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