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Fat Guy

World's best carrot-cake recipe

230 posts in this topic

I was thinking that for the cake I want for my son's birthday party ( the FC) ,I am going to follow Ling's advice and use butter and oil, I havent try it yet but it seams that everyone likes it better that way.I did try it the first time with canola oil and it was fine very moist , indeed a very yummy cake ( I mean I am on a diet and I have to have a little piece once in a while , or everyday  :laugh: )

I agree with the butter oil combo - and FYI - I did the Southern Living Buttermilk glaze cake recipe only with the Frog Commissary filling and the cream cheese frosting from Southern Living - less sugar - and GREAT!!!!!

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Jake, the carrot cake recipe that I’ve been using conveniently dumps everything into a large mixing bowl.  I don’t bother with an electric mixer and just combine all the ingredients by hand with a big wooden spoon. 

In a large mixing bowl whisk together these  dry ingredients

2 cups all purpose flour

2 cups sugar

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

½ teaspoon salt

Then add: 

3 cups shredded carrots

1 cup vegetable oil

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

4 eggs

½ cup chopped/minced pineapple

½ cup chopped walnuts

Blend all the ingredients until well combined.  Pour and equally divide into greased and flour baking pan(s), one bundt pan or 2 round 8’ pans. 

Bake for 30-45 minutes depending on pans used.  I like to do the toothpick thing to check the center. 

We don't have very good firm cream cheese here, but I always try to frost with what we do have available, by mixing about 2-3 cups of powdered sugar into 8 ounces of cream cheese and 50 grams of softened salted butter, adding 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract at the end. 

I'm having the last slice as I type, and it's still good and moist after a few days. 

.

I've noticed spaghetti's recipe, the epicurious recipe and Frog Commissary's are pretty much the same. Aside from the difference in fruit and nut combos, the other difference I noticed was one used 2 tsp. soda, one used 2 tsp. powder and one used 1 tsp. each soda and powder.

I'd like to know is there a noticable difference in height and texture between the three?

I don't see that your question was answered and I'd like to know too. :smile:


Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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Here is the Blue Ribbon Carrot cake aka Southern Living carrot cake. Forgive me, but I just copied this post from my foodblogging post.

I left off the glaze.

So the carrot cake is finished. I just have to make the frosting. I'm going to freeze the unfrosted cake and frost it when I get home on Sunday. The recipe is called Blue Ribbon Carrot Cake. Its originally from the Portland Junior League. There is a buttermilk glaze as well as a cream cheese icing, but I usually skip that part.

Here is the recipe. In my own words, of course.

2 c All purpose flour

2 ts Soda

1/2 ts Salt

2 ts Ground cinnamon

3 Eggs; well beaten

3/4 c Vegetable oil

3/4 c Buttermilk

2 c Sugar

2 ts Vanilla extract

1 cn Crushed pineapple; drained,

- 8-oz can

2 c Grated carrots

1 cn Flaked coconut; 3 1/2-oz can

1 c Walnuts; chopped

BUTTERMILK GLAZE

1 c Sugar

1/2 ts Soda

1/2 c Buttermilk

1/2 c Butter

1 tb Light corn syrup

1 ts Vanilla extract

ORANGE-CREAM CHEESE FROSTING

1/2 c Butter; softened

8 oz Cream cheese; softened

1 ts Vanilla extract

2 c Powdered sugar; sifted

1 ts Grated orange rind

1 ts orange juice

Combine flour, soda, salt, and cinnamon; set aside. Combine eggs, oil, buttermilk, sugar, and vanilla; beat until smooth. Stir in flour mixture, pineapple, carrots, coconut, and chopped walnuts. Pour batter into 2 greased and floured 9-inch round cake pans. Bake at 350~ for 35-40 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Immediately spread Buttermilk Glaze evenly over layers. Cool in pans 15 minutes; remove from pans, and let cool completely. Spread Orange-Cream Cheese Frosting between layers and on top and sides of cake. Store cake in refrigerator. Buttermilk Glaze. Combine sugar, soda, buttermilk, butter, and corn syrup in a Dutch oven. Bring to a boil; cook 4 minutes, stirring often. Remove from heat, and stir in vanilla. Yield. About 1 1/2 cups. Orange-Cream Cheese Frosting. Combine butter and cream cheese, beating until light and fluffy. Add vanilla, powdered sugar, rind, and juice; beat until fluffy.

gallery_25969_665_789723.jpg

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Here is the Blue Ribbon Carrot cake aka Southern Living carrot cake.  Forgive me, but I just copied this post from my foodblogging post. 

I left off the glaze. 

So the carrot cake is finished.  I just have to make the frosting.  I'm going to freeze the unfrosted cake and frost it when I get home on Sunday.    The recipe is called Blue Ribbon Carrot Cake.  Its originally from the Portland Junior League.  There is a buttermilk glaze as well as a cream cheese icing, but I usually skip that part. 

Here is the recipe.  In my own words, of course.

2 c All purpose flour

2 ts Soda

1/2 ts Salt

2 ts Ground cinnamon

3 Eggs; well beaten

3/4 c Vegetable oil

3/4 c Buttermilk

2 c Sugar

2 ts Vanilla extract

1 cn Crushed pineapple; drained,

- 8-oz can

2 c Grated carrots

1 cn Flaked coconut; 3 1/2-oz can

1 c Walnuts; chopped

BUTTERMILK GLAZE

1 c Sugar

1/2 ts Soda

1/2 c Buttermilk

1/2 c Butter

1 tb Light corn syrup

1 ts Vanilla extract

ORANGE-CREAM CHEESE FROSTING

1/2 c Butter; softened

8 oz Cream cheese; softened

1 ts Vanilla extract

2 c Powdered sugar; sifted

1 ts Grated orange rind

1 ts orange juice

Combine flour, soda, salt, and cinnamon; set aside. Combine eggs, oil, buttermilk, sugar, and vanilla; beat until smooth. Stir in flour mixture, pineapple, carrots, coconut, and chopped walnuts. Pour batter into 2 greased and floured 9-inch round cake pans. Bake at 350~ for 35-40 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Immediately spread Buttermilk Glaze evenly over layers. Cool in pans 15 minutes; remove from pans, and let cool completely. Spread Orange-Cream Cheese Frosting between layers and on top and sides of cake. Store cake in refrigerator. Buttermilk Glaze. Combine sugar, soda, buttermilk, butter, and corn syrup in a Dutch oven. Bring to a boil; cook 4 minutes, stirring often. Remove from heat, and stir in vanilla. Yield. About 1 1/2 cups. Orange-Cream Cheese Frosting. Combine butter and cream cheese, beating until light and fluffy. Add vanilla, powdered sugar, rind, and juice; beat until fluffy.

I was looking over this recipe and it looked so familiar, so I pulled out my recipe book and it was the one I use. I begged this recipe from my friend who makes it once a year, delicious. I am not even a true carrot cake fan and yet I would crave this cake. The only difference in my recipe is two things, butter instead of vegetable oil and brown sugar instead of white, both the same quantities.

I never knew about the buttermilk glaze though and his cream cheese frosting is different, also delicious. Funny, now I know the recipes origin.


Edited by RodneyCk (log)

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Bo Friberg's Carrot sponge from his " Professional Pastry Chef" is the moistest carrot cake I have ever seen. Never need to use simple syrup, and has gotten rave reviews from all who have tasted it ( a cream cheese frosting of your choice makes a great filling )

Jason

Sorry to say but I thought friberg's carrot sponge was oily, had an off color and lacked flavor. I'd try the frog commissary first or the recipe I posted on the best carrot cake thread.

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I was looking over this recipe and it looked so familiar, so I pulled out my recipe book and it was the one I use. I begged this recipe from my friend who makes it once a year, delicious. I am not even a true carrot cake fan and yet I would crave this cake. The only difference in my recipe is two things, butter instead of vegetable oil and brown sugar instead of white, both the same quantities.

I never knew about the buttermilk glaze though and his cream cheese frosting is different, also delicious. Funny, now I know the recipes origin.

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I was looking over this recipe and it looked so familiar, so I pulled out my recipe book and it was the one I use. I begged this recipe from my friend who makes it once a year, delicious. I am not even a true carrot cake fan and yet I would crave this cake. The only difference in my recipe is two things, butter instead of vegetable oil and brown sugar instead of white, both the same quantities.

I never knew about the buttermilk glaze though and his cream cheese frosting is different, also delicious. Funny, now I know the recipes origin.

this recipe looked familair to me as well. i checked my cake files, and sure enough, i made this one before, mine is called "excellent carrot cake", though. it was my dad's favorite out of all the carrot cakes i made. i really liked this recipe because it was similair to the one they serve at baker's square. :smile: i'm gonna have to give the recipe another try but this time with the buttermilk glaze. does anyone know if the glaze makes the cake to wet to stack? can it be used for weddings? thanks

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thanks caroline! the buttermilk glaze sounds heavenly. :wub:

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hi ling, you cake looks awesome. did you use 3 seperate pans?

if so, can you give me some tips on how to take them out without the cakes cracking?

It is normal that at the end of baking this cake the top middle sink slightly?

It was fine till almost the end ( 70 minutes ).The crust its a bit more crunchy of what I was expecting , I thought that would be moist all the way from inside out.It can be because I am in altitude should have I lower the sugar in the formula ?

I havent taste it yet but it looked pretty good with the frosting ( I didnt make the filling since was just a test one for next week ).I was thinking to make instead of a big cake a bunch of little cup cake with  frosting and all for the birthday.

Another thing, I have noticed that the frosting its a bit too soft , I mean in this heat ,can I raise the amount of cream cheese to make it little bit stiffer so it can resist longer out of the fridge ?( today it seems like everytime it was out it would get soft very fast ).

Thank you

Did you bake them in three 8 inch pans? I don't recall baking my cakes for that long (70 minutes)...more like 45-55 minutes for that size since each cake is so much thinner than a bundt cake.

I've never had this cake sink on me...they always bake up quite level (i.e. I frequently don't need to level them at all). Also, the top is never crunchy on my cake.

I don't follow the recipe for the FC frosting. I always use 2:1 cream cheese to butter, with a squeeze of orange juice and very little icing sugar.

gallery_7973_3014_85315.jpg

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Yes, I did use 3 separate pans. I've never had an issue with the cakes cracking. I grease the pans, and put a round of parchment paper at the bottom. I just run a knife around the edge of the cakes after they've come out of the oven and they all pop out cleanly.

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I like using the grease in a spray can with flour, like Baker's Joy. Spray the pans, then put parchment in the bottom, then spray the parchment. I never have a problem with cakes sticking or cracking as a result.


Edited by RodneyCk (log)

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parchment paper, i wanna slap myself in the head. lol..makes total sense now. thanks!

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I just finished baking my husbands annual carrot cake for his birthday tomorrow and was wondering what is the best way to store it until I frost it tomorrow? Cling wrap at room temperature (it's about 75 F)? The refrigerator?


Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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I just finished baking my husbands annual carrot cake for his birthday tomorrow and was wondering what is the best way to store it until I frost it tomorrow? Cling wrap at room temperature (it's about 75 F)? The refrigerator?

You could freeze a cake, but since it is going to be eaten the next day then just wrap it in plastic wrap and leave it on your counter. Refrigerators will dry out your cake. I always try to avoid them if possible.

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Thanks RodneyCk. Guess I'll take it out of the 'fridge. :biggrin:


Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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There is my commissary cake , with the alteration we talked about ( half butter half oil ) and the frosting as Ling suggested 2 cream cheese one butter and sugar at taste ( much better ).

gallery_44494_2801_16054.jpg

Hehe not much of a cake decorator :laugh::rolleyes:


Edited by Desiderio (log)

Vanessa

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Thank you Ling , I didnt excatley use half and half was more like 1 1/2 sticks of butter ( melted ) and the rest of oil.Less sugar in the cake its also nice as for the frosting , expecially using crushed pineapple .The frsoting though was little bit on the tangy side it was very nice and citrucy ( can I say that ? :huh: ).

Thank you so much for all the help on making this great cake , a new love for me :raz:


Vanessa

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Thanks Squirrelly Cakes! That's what I was thinking as well when I read the recipe - the beating for 5 minutes thing had me worried that it might toughten the cake. Anyway, I ended up ignoring that step because I didn't have time.

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Baked a carrot cake last night and need to ice it. Question about cream cheese and butter - should the butter be salted or unsalted (I don't bake ever, can you tell? :blink: )?


Eating pizza with a fork and knife is like making love through an interpreter.

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Baked a carrot cake last night and need to ice it. Question about cream cheese and butter - should the butter be salted or unsalted (I don't bake ever, can you tell? :blink: )?

unsalted always better....

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Last year (or the one before- aged cheese is good, aged memory, not so much :wacko: ) I used the Cooks Illustrated recipe. Eh. Neither of us were impressed with its flavor or texture. I read recipes until I was blue in the face and decided to sort of wing it.

So..

2 c. AP flour

2 tsp. baking soda

1 tsp. salt

1 1/2 tsp. Saigon cinnamon

1/4 tsp. ground ginger

1 c. granulated white cane sugar

1 c. lightly packed golden brown sugar

4 large eggs, room temp.

3/4 c. vegetable oil

1/2 c. melted, unsalted butter, cooled

3 c. coarsely grated peeled carrots (I like to see and feel the vegetable pieces, so no fine grate for me!)

The frosting...

3 8 oz. packages of Philadelphia cream cheese, softened to room temp.

3 c. powdered sugar (perhaps a bit less)

1 1/2-2 tsp. pure vanilla

1 T. heavy cream

Birthday sprinkles and candles :raz:

I baked the cakes in two, round 9 inch pans, with waxed paper on the bottom and Pam with flour spray. They were baked at 350 F for 40 minutes (though 35 minutes would've been acceptable). The butter is *the* key for fantastic flavor. Really.

gallery_17172_3382_60560.jpg


Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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Thanks RodneyCk. Guess I'll take it out of the 'fridge.  :biggrin:

Oh...not so fast. I would have recommended refrigerating this type of unfrosted cake.

Sometimes it's best to refrigerate carrot - vegetable - fruit puree, oil based based cake layers, even if its overnight -- it's summertime and I would strongly advise it leaving it at room temp, even with the air conditioning on. If the room is humid or warm or it's summertime, which it is, you want to refrigerate it. It's to help prevent mold from forming on the cake because it's espeially moist, which vegetable/fruit puree cakes are.

Sometimes I even freeze these types of cakes overnight to help prevent really sticky, mushy tops from forming on the cakes, especially when stored at room temp encased in plastic wrap during the summertime. They attract moisture like sponges and plastic wrap makes an environment like a hot-house. At least wrap the cakes in foil.

Oil based cakes such as carrot cakes, will not dry out very much when refrigerated, so you need not worry. Wrap in foil.

P.S. The cake looks simply wonderful and delish! I'm drooling! ~


Edited by Sarah Phillips (log)

Happy Baking! Sarah Phillips, President and Founder, http://www.baking911.com

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Good point Sarah! Heat and humidity can wreak havoc on cakes.

And as a decorator, the additional advantage to freezing a cake -if only overnight or for a few hours- is that it sets the crumb making icing that cake, a lot less crumby to work with! Freezing also attract some of the middle moisture to the outer edges of the cake and if you have just very slightly overbaked the edges, freezing will often soften them up.

Hugs Squirrelly Cakes

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