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What would you do with garden-fresh Roma tomatoes?


msphoebe
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I have a few pounds of fresh Roma tomatoes given to me by a friend today (picked this morning, not the ones that have been sitting on the counter for a week!) He promised to bring more tomorrow! What would YOU do with a few pounds of garden-fresh Roma tomatoes?

BTW...he also shared a pound or more of fresh-picked cherry tomatoes...I've been using those for salad, but would love to hear your ideas for incorporating those into a great dish as well.

tia!

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Well I would use some for a salsa fresca. I made some this week and had it with my breaded fillet of cod and it was just tasty as can be. Also put it on my spinach naan as I couldn't get enough. I'm looking forward to more fresh salsa with good tomatoes. :biggrin:

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Good idea with the salsa, since Romas are not the best for slicing and eating.

For the cherry tomatoes, I might halve them and toss with some bocconcini, basil and olive oil (maybe garlic?), and do a little Balsamic. You know, a micro-Caprese salad.

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4-6 Roma tomatoes

3 tablespoons dairy sour cream

1 tablespoon snipped fresh basil

1 tablespoon fine dry bread crumbs

1 tablespoon finely shredded or grated Parmesan cheese

salt and pepper to taste

cut tomatoes in half crosswise.... spread cut side of each tomato with sour cream... sprinkle with basil and then bread crumbs and Parmesan cheese.... arrange tomato halves in a foil pan. ... place the foil pan containing tomatoes on grill ..... cover and grill for 10 to 15 minutes or until tomatoes are heated through. garnish with fresh basil .... makes 4 servings.

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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I can tell you what NOT to do with the cherry tomatoes: put them whole in a quiche. When I was in Toronto I had that dish for an appetizer at Osgoode Hall, and while it was delicious and well-made, the cherry tomatoes were like little firebombs--you know how when you bite into a cherry tomato it kind of explodes? imagine that at 375 degrees. ouch.

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For eating them fresh I couldn't give better recommendations than those already suggested. If you have any left (!!! :biggrin: ) I would oven dry them- very slowly. Approx. 200 degrees, or even a bit less- lightly oil (evoo) your baking sheet. And they really must be dry before storage (I prefer a wax-paper lined glass jar) otherwise they develop mold or/and an 'off' flavor.

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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p.s. here's something i made last week:

--char the skins of the tomatoes under a broiler/on a grill

--do the same thing with some corn on the cob, but brown, not char

--do the same thing with some serrano peppers

cut the corn off the cob, cut up the tomatoes and peppers, put in some onion (I guess you could char the onion too, but I thought fresh onion kind of brightened up the thing. put them all together with some lime juice and cilantro (once it cools).

oddly enough (or not) this is really amazingly good on good hot dogs--maybe not the all-beef kosher kind that the NY crew reviewed, but definitely on the pork-based kind the Amish make.

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When it comes to cherry tomatoes, I like tossing them with evoo, lots of chopped garlic, and assorted herbs and then slow roasting them in the oven. You can eat them straight or use as a bruscetta topping.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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For eating them fresh I couldn't give better recommendations than those already suggested. If you have any left (!!! :biggrin: ) I would oven dry them- very slowly. Approx. 200 degrees, or even a bit less- lightly oil (evoo) your baking sheet. And they really must be dry before storage (I prefer a wax-paper lined glass jar) otherwise they develop mold or/and an 'off' flavor.

Great idea!

Technique I use: quarter smaller tomatoes (Romas, lengthwise) and toss in a bowl with olive oil, a smattering of salt, some fresh ground black pepper, and a scant touch of sugar. Put on a foil-covered sheet pan at 200 degrees, and roast for about two hours, until they're shriveled but moist.

I love to use these in an omelet with smoked trout and goat cheese.

Welcome to tomato cocaine.

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Sometimes I make tomato concassee with fresh tomatoes. I then freeze it in a mini-muffin tin, and pop out the little divots of concasse for adding to recipes that need a little tomato boost.

I also love tomatoes simply sliced in half and pan-roasted on top of the stove for about an hour with plenty of EVOO and garlic until completely depleted. Mmmmm.

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I'd use the Roma tomatoes for Pasta Caprese. Assuming you like mozzarella chese, raw garlic, basil, olive oil and vinegar.

"A fool", he said, "would have swallowed it". Samuel Johnson

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If you have way too many roma's, nothing wrong with halving them, scooping out the seeds and setting them in the sun or a very low oven to "sun" dry them. Or roasting them. Depends on what is too many.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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For the Romas Caprese simple and the best thing to really enjoy the taste. Since they are home grown the sweetness of the Romas will be great.

For the cherry tomatoes, I would slice them throw some garlic and Oregano and very lightly sauté with some evoo. Great fresh pasta sauce. I do this all the time with grape tomatoes.

Never trust a skinny chef

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look in pat wells' provence cookbook for a recette similar to tanabutler's.

best cold process olive oil, med/slow oven, fresh tomatoes (preferably heirloom), and a little seasoning.

as long as each ingredient is of utmost integrity, you will realise a concentration of flavor that will bring you much satisfaction

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In less than a week, I will have about 200 Romas that will ripen all at once. I slowly roast them, plain, and then put them into a dozen or so zip-lock bags and toss them into the freezer. This means that all winter long, I can grab a bag and have instant tomato sauce that is reminiscent of the best of summer.

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Mmmmm....sounds like roasting a few must be done!

I will try the Caprese, and has anyone got a list of ingredients for a really good bruschetta?

Olive oil, diced tomatoes, fresh basil, garlic, a little bit of salt; what else?

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Great topic. We've hit the tomato mother lode at our house. I have a dozen tomatoes on my counter, another dozen that should be ripe in the next couple of days, and another 3 dozen greens waiting in the wings!

If we can't can all of them I may start giving them away to DC egulleteers. :smile:

msphoebe, that bruschetta sound perfect - maybe a little fresh cracked pepper?

Heather Johnson

In Good Thyme

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For the Romas Caprese simple and the best thing to really enjoy the taste.  Since they are home grown the sweetness of the Romas will be great.

For the cherry tomatoes,  I would slice them throw some garlic and Oregano and very lightly sauté with some evoo.  Great fresh pasta sauce.  I do this all the time with grape tomatoes.

I find that Romas are not tomatoes I enjoy in slices. I prefer them mixed with other things, as they aren't that juicy. They are better for cooking and sauces and pastes, and as someone suggested, in salsa and oven-roasted.

Here is my current bumpercrop of tomatoes:

The top layer of a box of TomatoFest heirlooms:

i10623.jpg

The bottom layer:

i10622.jpg

And these beauties from the farmers market:

i10672.jpg

Plus I have another plateful of huge heirlooms from a party Monday night at a farm up near UCSC.

I need tomato suggestions, big time. I might need to make a swimming pool of salsa. (Actually, that would be a sacrilege, given the quality of these tomatoes.)

Does anyone have the recipe for tomato water that was published with the review of Blue Hill Stone Barns in the NY Times recently?

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Oh my...I'm speechless! My mouth is watering, just looking at those photos. Lucky you!

I'd almost forgotten this recipe I made several times last summer. It is Martha Stewart's originally, but I made some modifications as noted. It was very good!

* Exported from MasterCook *

Creamy Tomato Soup

Recipe By : Martha Stewart

Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories : Soups & Stews

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 medium onion -- finely chopped

3 cloves garlic -- minced

10 cups canned crushed tomatoes

5 1/4 cups Homemade chicken stock or canned

low-sodium chicken broth -- skimmed of fat

3 sprigs fresh oregano -- plus more for garnish

1/2 cup half and half

salt and freshly ground black pepper

Melt butter in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat. Add onion and garlic, and cook, stirring, until translucent, about 6 minutes.

Add tomatoes, stock, and oregano and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer gently until thickened, about 45 minutes. Remove oregano sprigs.

Slowly add half-and-half, stirring constantly. Season with salt and pepper. Garnish with oregano, if desired. Serve hot.

Source:

"www.MarthaStewart.com"

Copyright:

"2002"

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

NOTES : I used fresh tomatoes. Would recommend peeling and seeding.

Since I didn't have quite enough tomatoes, I added a 6 oz. can of tomato paste.

Also added 1 cup of heavy cream in place of the 1/2 cup of half and half.

Used immersion blender to puree the tomatoes.

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Great topic. We've hit the tomato mother lode at our house. I have a dozen tomatoes on my counter, another dozen that should be ripe in the next couple of days, and another 3 dozen greens waiting in the wings!

If we can't can all of them I may start giving them away to DC egulleteers. :smile:

msphoebe, that bruschetta sound perfect - maybe a little fresh cracked pepper?

For the greater good of the Shorter family I would be willing to make the sacrifice and take some off of your hands :smile:

True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.

It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,

but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

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has anyone got a list of ingredients for a really good bruschetta?

Olive oil, diced tomatoes, fresh basil, garlic, a little bit of salt; what else?

A little bit of balsamic vinegar, or sherry vinegar

I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.

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For eating them fresh I couldn't give better recommendations than those already suggested. If you have any left (!!! :biggrin: ) I would oven dry them- very slowly. Approx. 200 degrees, or even a bit less- lightly oil (evoo) your baking sheet. And they really must be dry before storage (I prefer a wax-paper lined glass jar) otherwise they develop mold or/and an 'off' flavor.

yeah - what she said.

or, at least for the romas split in half, strew with chiffonaded basil and oven poach with some olive oil. i like to do this then freeze the tomatoes with some of the oil for the middle of winter when i just need that OOMPH in a dish that frozen cooked sunlight will provide

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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I'd be happy to help you out, too, and take some.

Cut them in half lengthwise, scoop out the pulp. Put a gob of goat cheese inside, top with some cracked black pepper and chiffonade of basil. Wrap them in a foil packet and put them on the grill til they're warm and the cheese is getting melty.

Or, slice them and layer them in a gratin dish with other above ingredients and bake in the oven.

Serve with lots of crusty bread.

Laurie

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