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Carolyn Tillie

Vosges Haut Chocolat

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Back to VHC, Katrina Markoff started out in the Bucktown/WP environs with her chocolate inovations. It is good stuff, elegant stuff, worth it stuff. And she's fun, on top of that.

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Here's a question I am struggling with in regards to Vosges and other chocolatiers and chocolate manufacturers whose marketing image differs radically from the reality of production:

Does it really matter?

The Vosges image (to me) is fashionista au courant with lots of deliberate references to haute couture. That makes me think that things are lovingly hand made in small batches by specially trained Vosges employees hewing to the desire to produce elegant product for a highly discerning (and rich) clientele.

Problem is, there are many other gourmet food products (not necessarily pastry) that are not made by the company marketing them. Instead, these companies hire other companies to cook, bottle, and label, which is, in essence, what Vosges does.

Does the consumer really care? Am I holding Vosges to the wrong standard by wanting them to hand make, in house, everything they sell?

There is another instance just like this that I am in the middle of writing about and I am struggling with how to handle it.

Does it matter? Should I care?

Keep in mind that the question about product does not diminish my respect and admiration for what Katrina, Natalie, et al have managed to accomplish. That part is brilliant - though I wonder, given the other issues I have, whether or not it is sustainable in the long run.

:Clay


Clay Gordon

president, pureorigin

editor/publisher www.chocophile.com

founder, New World Chocolate Society

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Well I have a question to ask those of you who know more about chocolate than I do. I first "discovered" Vosges in its first (and then only) boutique in the Peninsula Hotel in Chicago. It was early 2002. I thought the chocolate was fantastic (had some there - brought some home).

My husband remembered that I liked it - so he ordered it for me on the internet. And it wasn't like I remembered. It was good - but not fantastic. So did the production techniques change? Or are my taste-bud memories faulty (nothing like eating chocolate after having a great massage to do you in :smile: )?

Note that I can't get any of these high-end chocolates except via the internet. And that my husband usually buys them for me. He absolutely loves Vosges because it has a great web site. And its shipping is first rate (which is important when you're shipping something like chocolate to Florida). I prefer Maison du Chocolat for the chocolate - but my husband tells me its web site is positively a mess (although the shipping there is excellent too). Anyway - since he orders chocolate for me more than once a year - he buys a little from here - a little from there - etc. (from places other than Vosges and Maison du Chocolat too). Variety is the spice of life!

Anyway - additional information would be appreciated. Robyn

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Although its been out a few months I finally received my first shipment of Vosges Mo's Bacon Bar: 41%, applewood smoked bacon and alder wood smoked salt. At first the taste was bacon grease. Then I threw a big chunk in and I really liked it. It won't be my daily bar, but nice for odd factor eating.

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Although its been out a few months I finally received my first shipment of Vosges Mo's Bacon Bar: 41%, applewood smoked bacon and alder wood smoked salt.  At first the taste was bacon grease.  Then I threw a big chunk in and I really liked it.  It won't be my daily bar, but nice for odd factor eating.

I've got a bar of this at home. I really like it. My SIL and I had the chance to taste it down at Premier Gourmet in Buffalo and I brought home a bar the last time I stopped by there. It would be fun to duplicate next batch of bacon I make.

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I also recently picked up the bacon bar (was totally unaware there was a new flavor). I sampled it at the store and at first didn't like it at all. Thought I would give it another shot though and bought the bar. Still wasn't sure I liked it after the first square. But now...it's pretty addicting. I mean, it's real bacon (the package has an expiration date) - nice and crunchy and salty.

When I was at the store I got to sample a truffle for the first time too. Wanted the Taleggio, but they were out so had the balsamic. Certainly tasted like balsamic without being too overpowering. It was good, but I think i'll stick to the bars (although, i'm intrigued by the cocoas - maybe when the weather gets colder).

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I have tasted the bacon bar and the white chocolate kalamata olive bar.

Both were good.

The bacon is not the type of bacon that you get at the supermarket, its the gourmet

type.


Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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What Constitutes gourmet bacon?


“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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What Constitutes gourmet bacon?

Gourmet Bacon is the kind you get cut for you at a butcher or deli, or one that is specialty smoked with specialty woods...

Or small batch country bacon.

Smithfield is definitely Gourmet.

NOT the Oscar Mayer or Hatfield brands


Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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I'm a bacon bar naysayer. I didn't like it, neither did my husband. My parents did, so maybe it's one of those "love it or hate it" creations. I love bacon, I love chocolate (although dark more than milk), and I love salty and sweet things together, but I didn't like this.


Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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Wow. Vosges just opened a shop on Madison...maybe I'll have to check it out this weekend. I pass it constantly but haven't been in yet. Bacon Bar, you say?


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Am usually chocolate purist. However, i loved the bacon bar. Am thinking of making the ultimate morning pain au chocolate this way: warm a croissant, slice in half, put in a few pieces of bacon chocolate bar, close up the croissant to let the chocolate warm up.

Not a bad start to the AM, no?

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