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Vegetarian Cookbooks Celebrating the Flavor


helenas
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It might seem ironic that with my current signature evangalizing the Meat book i would want to solicit the feedback on any interesting vegetarian ones. But it fact, the Meat book was one of the reasons for me to seriously reconsider my diet, in terms of meat sources and other related issues.

Now, i still want to make delicious and interesting dishes, so here is my current list of books that live up to the idea:

A Passion for Vegetables by Paul Gayler, a gem.

Cafe Paradiso Seasons, delight to read: have yet to cook from it but recipes sound so good.

The Gate Vegetarian Cookbook: Where Asia Meets the Mediterranean: i expected more from it considering a very favorable review in UK Telegraph, but i need more time to make sure.

Vegetables by Guy Martin: breathtaking photography by Isabelle Rozenbaum, she worked on several book with Martin - i wish they were published in english, and in french they're damn expensive.

Of course, Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone is always used as a source for ideas. Honorary mention - Schneider's Vegetables Amaranth to Zucchini.

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Deborah Madison's Greens is very good, too. (Actually, I like all three Greens books). But in fact a lot of good veg recipes are found in non-vegetarian books: James Paterson's books, especially Splendid Soups and Vegetables, are excellent resources, and the CIA's Book of Soups is another I use a lot (I like making soup, what can I say). Any good Indian cookbook is likely to be very veg-friendly. I've had mixed results with Madhur Jaffrey's World Vegetarian, but it's a good source of ideas.

"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

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Any of Jack Bishop's books. His Complete Italian Vegetarian Cookbook is something I turn to all the time and Vegetables Every Day is a good resource because it gives suggestions on storage and simple techniques. He just came out with a new volume called something like A Year in A Vegetarian Kitchen that I can't wait to purchase.

The Cafe Paradiso book is on my wishlist. I got a look at a copy awhile ago and the US edition was published recently.

Edited by bloviatrix (log)

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Two more great books...

"Savoring the Day" by Judith Benn Hurley.....'recipes and remedies to enhance your natural rhythms...'

"The Splendid Grain" by Rebecca Wood.....'robust, inspired recipes for grains with vegetables, fish, poultry, meat and fruit....'

Both exceptional and quite different from 'the usual'!

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For simple fare, especially when feeding a family, I never get tired of Molly Katzen, especially Still Life with Menu, which has organized menus. There are probably thirty or fifty things I've tried in there, and not one I wouldn't do again.

I like her style, and I trust her.

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the one i would not get rid of (you may have noticed i'm paring my books down) is fields of greens by annie somerville. a great resource.

i agree with others that some non-vegetarian books treat vegetables and fruits with respect. james paterson, of course. another i like is a fresh look at saucing food by deidre davis. she works with sauces but covers a wide range of vegetative matter. check out your local library or do an interlibrary loan and if you like it(and it is still in print) pick a copy up.

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

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Cafe Paradiso Seasons, delight to read: have yet to cook from it but recipes sound so good.

I have cooked quite a few recipes from the first Cafe Paradiso (wheras I seem everytime I decide to buy season amazon.co.uk runs out of it). I also like Dennis Cotter's comments to his recipes, a bit too agressive to meat eatears at times but full of wit.

Apart on or two uh-uh dishes the rest were a success. The only criticism I have is the excessive use of cream in the recipes, but Cotter is Irish and I'm Italian, so you can guess what I'd use instead :biggrin: .

My favourite source for vegetable (and often vegetarian) recipes are two Italian books on the cuisine of Naples and of Sicily , comprehensive and well written but sadly not translated into English.

Il Forno: eating, drinking, baking... mostly side effect free. Italian food from an Italian kitchen.
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  • 3 months later...

I just concluded research on vegetarian cookbooks by reading reviews and looking through a few in B&N, before deciding which one to buy my vegetarian friend for Christmas. I went with Passionate Vegetarian, and it was tempting to buy one for myself, too!

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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I second the nomination of jack Bishop's Vegetables Every Day I use it all the time. Chez panisse Vegetables, too, but less so.

But I insist you at least check out Heidi Swawnson's Cook 1.0. She's a fellow eGulleter and this book is very clever. She is a friend and customer so I hope I'm not being too cheesy but really, you owe it to yourself to check it out. My hunch is you'll buy it.

Here are two recipes on my site.

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I second the nomination of jack Bishop's Vegetables Every Day I use it all the time. Chez panisse Vegetables, too, but less so.

But I insist you at least check out Heidi Swawnson's Cook 1.0. She's a fellow eGulleter and this book is very clever. She is a friend and customer so I hope I'm not being too cheesy but really, you owe it to yourself to check it out. My hunch is you'll buy it.

Here are two recipes on my site.

Those are my two favorites too-and I have about a dozen vegetable cookbooks, since I belonged to a CSA for many years and needed to learn how to cook a wide range of vegetables.

I'll check out Heidi's book, but I am soooo behind on reading the cookbooks I've bought this year that it may be a while.

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One that I've been turning to more frequently lately is Vegetarian Planet by Didi Emmons. It's saved me a few times when I really had no good idea what to do with what I had to use up in the fridge.

"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

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I can third (or perhaps fourth) the recommendation for Jack Bishop. We picked up A Year in a Vegetarian Kitchen a few months ago, and we've been making something new from it a couple of times each week. Most of the choices have been earmarked for repeats...

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  • 1 month later...
are any of these largely free of cheese- and cream-based recipies?  i don't like cheese, nor cream.  :)

hc

You might check out Peter Berley's books, Modern Vegetarian Kitchen, and Fresh Food Fast. Not strictly vegan, but mostly dairy-free. The Greens books (Greens, Fields of Greens, Everyday Greens) have a fair number of recipes with cheese and cream, but a lot without.

"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

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I second the nomination of jack Bishop's Vegetables Every Day I use it all the time. Chez panisse Vegetables, too, but less so.

But I insist you at least check out Heidi Swawnson's Cook 1.0. She's a fellow eGulleter and this book is very clever. She is a friend and customer so I hope I'm not being too cheesy but really, you owe it to yourself to check it out. My hunch is you'll buy it.

Here are two recipes on my site.

I think Heidi also did all the photos for the book. She posted a few on eGullet and they are beautiful.

I am also a big fan of the Madhur Jaffrey vegetarian cookbooks -- I have the first one, Worlds of the East, and it is falling apart from use at this point. I haven't been veg for over 5 years, but I still find myself going back to it for ideas. I wish she would do an all indian vegetarian cookbook, as those always tend to be my favorite recipes.

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Lord Krishna's Cuisine: The Art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking, by Yamuna Devi, will keep you busy for the rest of your life. This is my favorite cookbook (and I have a few hundred) and I am not even a vegetarian.

Edited by Pitter (log)
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