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Steve Plotnicki

Gordon Ramsay Royal Hospital Road

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I had some one cook me a baked potato foam, and fennel air in a working interview the other day, it was a shocker!

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i had a jacket potato with cheese and beans on saturday night from the spud man on the harbour. quality  :blink:

Sounds smashing :laugh:

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I tend to agree with basildog. Someone once fed me an M&S baked potato flavoured crisp. I am still recovering.

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I am looking to visit RHR in October and have tried to bypass the 2 months reservation policy - it's a long story. Does any one know what it's like to get a table at the moment on a friday night?

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Here's the review from may 2005 -

'And then I found ñoquis sféricos de patata con consome de piel de patata asada: a game-coloured meatless consommé that tasted of baked potato skins, in which floated white spheres that burst to yield the very essence of baked potato flesh, and glass-coloured ravioli full of butter. It was the taste and smell and childhood excitement of November 5 turned into a lot of balls – and perhaps the most astonishing single dish I have ever known. '

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/c...ticle388585.ece

It is in the El Bulli 2004 cookbook. Although their recipe for the consomme is just baked potato skins that first is simmered and then steeped in the cooking water, salted and filtered through a superbag.

The "gnocchi" is pretty cool, it is a spherified foam. All in all, not an extremely complicated dish actually.


Edited by TheSwede (log)

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I am looking to visit RHR in October and have tried to bypass the 2 months reservation policy - it's a long story. Does any one know what it's like to get a table at the moment on a friday night?

I just finished a stagiaire at RHR this morning, amazing experience. I will tell more about it, when i catch up on sleep!!!!!!!

Getting a table for dinner, will be hard at short notice, but they seem to be doing 30-36 for lunch every day......so may be worth a bash........

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dumb question - what's a superbag?

I don't what they but I'm pretty sure i want one

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http://www.cookingconcepts.co.uk/superbags.htm

that mycook looks like a good cheaper version of thermomix.


Edited by adey73 (log)

“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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How do you know its cheaper, I can't see the price?

El Corto Inglese in Spain seems to carry it for around 700 EUR.

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Matthew, I've seen it on a Spanish site for 600Euros http://www.catalogobuffet.com/afl/index.ph...roducts_id=1990

if the pound ever recovers against the Euro it will be a good buy


“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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That's better than the Thermomix, I'm surprised it can't be manufactured for less, I think the Thermomix lack of support in this country is its price, if they could get it below £500 it might stand a chance. Maybe theywill reduce to compete with the Mycook?


"Why would we want Children? What do they know about food?"

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its £625 plus VAT

oh - they mentioned introducing a vacpack machine for the home market at around £500 sometime soon


Edited by tony h (log)

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Can someone please explain why the London 2008 Michelin Guide has Gordon Ramsay at RHR listed as having a "Menu 40/85?" That seems to grossly underestimate the prices on the website.


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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Can someone please explain why the London 2008 Michelin Guide has Gordon Ramsay at RHR listed as having a "Menu 40/85?"  That seems to grossly underestimate the prices on the website.

I assume thats the set lunch/dinner prices. Agree they sound five or ten notes light (website lists it as 45/90).

Am going 2moro for supper so can check!

But bear in mind the guide was published jan08 so I'd assume the info is based on forms filled in by the restos what mid07 at the latest? that would probably account for the lag.

I don't think Michelin guide lists an "all in" price. More often the menu price.

J


More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!

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Here's my tardy post from a long lunch I experienced at RGR back in early June. If interested, images and notes dedicated to the rest of the courses can be found in this photoset

The highlight of the meal was the Assiette de l’Aubergine and the flood of desserts associated with it.

Here are a few representatives from the meal.

2591298786_8f96a9bb8d.jpg

Ravioli of lobster, langoustine and salmon

2591300780_94dfeb6e1d.jpg

Pan fried sea scallops from the Isle of Skye

2592829681_070d51284d.jpg

Caramelised Tarte Tatin & Granny Smith parfait

2601785340_9c7771d36d.jpg

Click on the link to see more.

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Can someone please explain why the London 2008 Michelin Guide has Gordon Ramsay at RHR listed as having a "Menu 40/85?"  That seems to grossly underestimate the prices on the website.

I assume thats the set lunch/dinner prices. Agree they sound five or ten notes light (website lists it as 45/90).

Am going 2moro for supper so can check!

But bear in mind the guide was published jan08 so I'd assume the info is based on forms filled in by the restos what mid07 at the latest? that would probably account for the lag.

I don't think Michelin guide lists an "all in" price. More often the menu price.

J

Unless you are looking at a different website than I am, Gordon Ramsay at RHR's "Menu Prestige" is listed at 120 GBP.


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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Unless you are looking at a different website than I am, Gordon Ramsay at RHR's "Menu Prestige" is listed at 120 GBP.

Check the website again mate - you're looking at the degustation. Basic three course alc lists at 45 / 90, which i assume has bumped up from 40 / 85 when they last filled in the mich form mid07.

As I said before I think mich tend to put down the basic menu price ex booze and doodads i.e. The core three course alc. Although arguably they should also add a third numb for the pricier degustation.

J


More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!

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Unless you are looking at a different website than I am, Gordon Ramsay at RHR's "Menu Prestige" is listed at 120 GBP.

Check the website again mate - you're looking at the degustation. Basic three course alc lists at 45 / 90, which i assume has bumped up from 40 / 85 when they last filled in the mich form mid07.

As I said before I think mich tend to put down the basic menu price ex booze and doodads i.e. The core three course alc. Although arguably they should also add a third numb for the pricier degustation.

J

No, I understand NOW that the Michelin was quoting only the prixe fixe. I'm just surprised that they missed printing the upper-deck degustation, or failing to mention it at all. Is the degustation new, too? I know that the "Menu Prestige" has been on the Gordon Ramsay at the London (so confusing having his outpost be in The States be in a hotel with the same name as the home office's city) since it opened. I'm just confused as to why Michelin would leave that off?


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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Hmmm well the latest red guide I have to hand is a Switzerland 06. The notes say they define a prix fixe menu as a meal composed of a main dish, an entrée and a desert not served on the weekend and jours feries (whatever they are).

Basically the standard mich definition doesn't account for a degustation. I suppose it sort of make snse given he majority of establishments lists will be non starred and probly not doing tasting menus. Plus as we all know they can be a bit slow to catch on with changed trends sometimes ;-)

J


More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!

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Actually, it's exactly because the Michelin guides are always very diligent about noting the existence of tasting "Menus" (as they're distinguished in the guide from the "Carte") and prices that I noticed the omission for Gordon Ramsay at RHR.

For example, I'm looking at the London Michelin profile of 1 Lombard Street (1 Michelin). It lists a "Menu 39/45GBP - Carte 54/62GBP."


“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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Actually, it's exactly because the Michelin guides are always very diligent about noting the existence of tasting "Menus" (as they're distinguished in the guide from the "Carte") and prices that I noticed the omission for Gordon Ramsay at RHR. 

For example, I'm looking at the London Michelin profile of 1 Lombard Street (1 Michelin).  It lists a "Menu 39/45GBP - Carte 54/62GBP."

I thought Michelin used "menu" in the French way i.e. simply a set menu of 3 courses - starter, main and dessert (table d'hôte). As they say in the guide the lowest price is usually the set lunch.

A tasting or degustation menu is usually a multi course extravaganza 7, 9, 11 or up-to 30 courses. I didn't think Michelin used these in the price categories because they are so variable (in terms of size and scope) and therefore you can't assess the relative value.

The ALC price is again for a three course meal and the range indicates the cost of a simple ALC choice to a more elaborate (expensive) choice.

Your example of 1 Lombard Street would tend to confirm this i.e. the set 3 course meal would usually be less expensive than a ALC choice and it is in the example. A degustation or tasting menu is usually more expensive than ALC.

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