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Gordon Ramsay Royal Hospital Road


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The policy stated repeatedly on the hold recording was "up to 2 months in advance," although they seemed to have plenty of open times when I finally got through.

"Tea and cake or death! Tea and cake or death! Little Red Cookbook! Little Red Cookbook!" --Eddie Izzard
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This is a bit off the subject, but does anyone have a recipe for gorgonzola ice cream? I am mightily intrigued by the idea of serving that with the pear tatin and would love to give it a try (although our cream is far inferior to yours! :sad: )

Jana

I may be in Nashville but my heart's in Cornwall

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  • 1 month later...

thought some may find the below article from Hotel and Caterer interesting

Gordon Ramsay set to take on first pub

(20 September 2006 12:12)

Gordon Ramsay’s first gastropub is set to be the Narrow Street Kitchen and Dining Room in London’s Limehouse.

The celebrity chef has agreed terms to take over the lease of the property, which is owned by the Waterside Pub Partnership, the joint venture between British Waterways and Scottish & Newcastle.

Gordon Ramsay Holdings, which already operates nine restaurants in London, is set to acquire the leasehold for the East London-based pub from current lessee Spirit Group.

A spokesperson for Spirit said: “We have conditionally agreed the sale of the company’s leasehold interest in the Narrow Street Pub and Dining Room to Gordon Ramsay Holdings. This is subject to the consent of the landlord which Spirit hopes will be forthcoming soon.”

Landlord, the Waterside Pub Partnership, was not available for comment.

Ramsay said that although his pubs would sell beer and spirits, their primary role would be to serve high-quality food. He has reportedly decided against increasing his haul of seven Michelin stars by opening any new restaurants in the UK.

If a man makes a statement and a woman is not around to witness it, is he still wrong?

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  • 4 weeks later...

Yep, that review was spot on, the foods dependable but boring and the decors worse. Mind you I've not seen the refurb but if its anything like any of his other efforts its not going to be exactly cutting edge.

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I have to say Rian, I could not agree less! I went to RHR a couple of weeks ago for my birthday and thought that the food was every bit three Michelin star quality. Each dish was perfectly executed and the service was exactly what you would hope for. I know I have said it before, but I really will sit down over the next 24 hours and put up a proper post about it.

It is funny, but I usually tend to agree with Marina's reviews, but I think that she was off the mark on this one. I do agree with her on the room, it is soul less, and tends to give a formal edge to the dining experience - we did not hear any laughter in the whole time we were there. It is almost as if the room has been designed to ensure people focus on the food rather the company. Every dish was well constructed with the flavours working well together, the only negative point that I found (and which Marina detected) was the lack of passion and personality to the dishes - they are clearly Gordon's dishes being created by a finely tuned machine and as such they lack his flair and soul - it is like a machine doing a monet painting, it may be technically perfect but it misses something.

In general the dishes were classical French with some modern twists in places, and high quality, luxury ingredients. You can't compare this kind of food with the likes of Aikens which is totally different. Aikens shocks and suprises (which I love), but there is room for him to do this with one Michelin star as if a dish doesn't hit the mark or is not to ones taste it is easier to survive on one star, but nt with three where the focus has to be on consistancy (each dish must be perfect and the same every time it goes out) and acceptence by its audience. These are some of the criteria that Michelin state as requirements for the aspirational three michelin stars, along with reuirements for service standards, somelliers, etc. I think my only big issue with the meal was one which Marina did not pick up on, and that was the bread. There waws only a choice of 3, pre-slice and rather dull breads, a mile away from the selection of gorgeous doughy delights offered at the likes of Aiklens and Pied a Terre.

If a man makes a statement and a woman is not around to witness it, is he still wrong?

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Its not that the room is ugly or anything, just rather soul-less and cold. It is very much about the food, and the room almost seems to emphasise that, forcing you to focus on it. It is not the kind of setting where I can immaging you going out with friends and having a good old laugh, having a pleasant and enjoyable evening yes, but that is it.

If a man makes a statement and a woman is not around to witness it, is he still wrong?

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Is Marina--our very own Circeplum--the best reviewer ever! this one was classic Marina.....i trust her with my palate completely and only wish I could write as wittily and seemingly effortlessly as she does.

isn't it all about whether she's right or not?

I have no idea either way, but not sure the writing is the main part?

A meal without wine is... well, erm, what is that like?

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I have no idea either way, but not sure the writing is the main part?

A subject discussed at length here.

Don't know if she's "the best" or not, but all I can tell you is that if there's no Metros left on a Wednesday, I cry. Cry like a baby that's been hit by a spanner.

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Is Marina--our very own Circeplum--the best reviewer ever! this one was classic Marina.....i trust her with my palate completely and only wish I could write as wittily and seemingly effortlessly as she does.

isn't it all about whether she's right or not?

I have no idea either way, but not sure the writing is the main part?

lets put it this way, perhaps a bit clearer?

there are other newspapers in which the reviewer/s warble on and on, hey we all know who they are, and sometimes it seems that its for the express purpose of the reviewer getting a few--or a whole bunch of--witty hilarious lines and observations scribbled onto the page.

then there is Marina whose witty prose and descriptions are always--though i can't claim to have read each and every review--but in the main, are all about the place and about reviewing it objectively and without her own agenda. I feel when i read Marina that she is writing it for the reader, not for the joy of hearing her own voice.

that is why i said: I trust her with my palate completely.

and that is why I said she is such an excellent writer. I should have added the words: restaurant reviewer for explicitness and clarity, though couldn't believe it would be necessary.

I really think she does the difficult balancing act of serving the reader and dishing it up with really sparkling writing.

Marlena the spieler

www.marlenaspieler.com

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  • 2 weeks later...
It is funny, but I usually tend to agree with Marina's reviews, but I think that she was off the mark on this one. 

After lunch today I have to agree on both counts. I easily had one of the best restaurant experiences of my eating year so far. Everything from the pumpkin soup with pumpkin tortellini amuse to the excellent "mother of pearl" chocolates was outstanding. The service is, in my opinion, unmatched in the UK and I struggle to recall a better experience anywhere else in the world. There's real warmth, character and personality, particularly from maitre'd Jean Claude, which is so often missing.

Cheapskate that I am, I had a bit of a battle with the sommelier to get the sort of affordable wines I was looking for but they are there on the list. I really like the room, although it did get a bit loud as the clock crept towards 4.00pm and the table of 8 having the tasting menu worked their way through their matched wines -but much rather that than a hushed reverance.

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It is funny, but I usually tend to agree with Marina's reviews, but I think that she was off the mark on this one. 

After lunch today I have to agree on both counts. I easily had one of the best restaurant experiences of my eating year so far. Everything from the pumpkin soup with pumpkin tortellini amuse to the excellent "mother of pearl" chocolates was outstanding. The service is, in my opinion, unmatched in the UK and I struggle to recall a better experience anywhere else in the world. There's real warmth, character and personality, particularly from maitre'd Jean Claude, which is so often missing.

Cheapskate that I am, I had a bit of a battle with the sommelier to get the sort of affordable wines I was looking for but they are there on the list. I really like the room, although it did get a bit loud as the clock crept towards 4.00pm and the table of 8 having the tasting menu worked their way through their matched wines -but much rather that than a hushed reverance.

but, to spookily echo jay's question from the ooze thread, were you announced or unannounced? :biggrin:

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I admit to using my contacts to avoid the pain of hanging on the phone to book but the staff showed no signs whatsoever of knowing who we were and we recieved no special treatment - no extra courses, no comp'd champagne no nothing. I ate at Aubergine twice and this is now my second visit to RHR so I'm hardly a regular but on each occasion Jean Claude has been his same charming self and the standards of service never seem to waver.

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There's real warmth, character and personality, particularly from maitre'd Jean Claude, which is so often missing.  

Ahh, there's nothing so pleasing on these boards as the gentle sound of fellatio.

wuz discussing this chap over lunch yesterday actually

I find him obsequious to a fault. Never forget him sliming to mum "so nice to see you again" on her first visit to RHR. Duh.

My brother quite likes him though and thinks service always very warm.

Credit where credit's due though. He' QB'ed the FoH for what a good decade or so and taken it to the top of the pile in London. No mean feat.

Each to his own I suppose...

J

More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!
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