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Mmm, golf course blackberries


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Went golfing yesterday and my wife tagged along. We brought a 2 liter pitcher with a lid and along the course stopped at several blackberry patches and filled the pitcher (and our bellies). I think they're the reason I only shot 1 over.

They're gorgeous and perfect. I'll try to upload a pic or two of the things. Better tasting than the ones at the farmer's markets, too, imo. Maybe I just like himalayan blackberries better than evergreen blackberries.

Anyway, I had an idea, but I don't think it would work, so I'm asking for suggestions. One caveat: I do have a couple pounds of day old pate brisee in the fridge. It's not necessary, but I wouldn't mind using that up.

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None of these are unique or even terribly interesting, but sometimes the simplest desserts are the best way to make use of great fruit. My last year's haul of Whidbey Island berries (picked from the dock) went into:

- 1 blackberry cobbler, made with fresh berries

..and the following uses of frozen batches of berries:

- 2 double-crust pies: 1 at thanksgiving, 1 for our copper river salmonfest last month

- 1 batch of blackberry ice cream: seeds removed from puree before adding to vanilla base, then studded with more berries after removal from the gizmo. served with homemade caramel sauce

I like the less-sweet, minty, funky taste of wild blackberries, which even the best farmers' market berries never touch.

Let us know what you decide to do with them!

~Anita

Anita Crotty travel writer & mexican-food addictwww.marriedwithdinner.com

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We picked 8 lbs a few weeks ago, and there was much leftover after jams and ice creams were made. I added them to a bottle of Kirschwasser, sugar, and a cinnamon stick. After a month and a bit, I'll strain and bottle it as a little reminder of summer - ripe blackberry liquor.

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Blackberry cinnamon rolls

Blackberry nut dumplings

Blackberry cheese blintzes

Blackberry barbeque sauce for meatballs or pork chops

Blackberry truffles, fudge or chocolate dipped blackberries

Blackberry meringues, creme brulee or blackberry crumb coffee cake.

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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Golf courses generally don't use many sprays, though. They're generally more heavy on the fertilizers. Also, I know these aren't sprayed and they're really around the edges of the golf course. But thanks for thinking of me.

One thing to remember is that we're in the west. A NYer friend of mine out here was amazed at how we handled ice and snow in Portland. "You guys just let it melt." Well, mostly. We put some gravel down, maybe some salt, and get the machines going. She said that in NY they put as much chemicals as necessary and shove the whole mess in the river.

I got home late last night so I just made something simple with about 1/4 of them. I cooked down some port with the blackberries and some lavendar. Then I strained it, added some honey, and cooked it down until it was a light syrup. I served that over vanilla ice cream with some fresh berries. It was pretty tasty.

Maybe I'll have time today to do something more interesting. Thanks for all the help so far.

Oh yeah, I did make some lunches for my wife, too. I made a stew of port, dried apricots, blackberries and figs with chicken demi-glace and the dark meat of the chicken that I cooked in the sauce. I'm going to make some polenta today to serve it over and put it in freezer containers for her lunches. But that has nothing to do with pastry.

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A man that cooks for his woman....(sigh) gotta love it. Can we clone you, Nick?

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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