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TDG: Steingarten Lagniappe


Dave the Cook
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Most people know Vogue as a big, fat magazine. eGullet knows it as home to Steingarten. But as hefty as the monthly is, it's still not sufficient unto Jeffrey. He had some stuff left over from his August column, and he sent it to us. Here are the extra recipes . . .

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Dave Scantland
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Eat more chicken skin.

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Meredith is the queen of Gelati in New York -- if you've havent yet had the opportunity to taste her gelato at OTTO, make sure you make time for it. I especially love her Olive Oil and Blood Orange gelato -- who would think it would be the perfect combination of flavors for a dessert?

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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We plan to do this on a semi regular basis, and we'll be getting more leftovers from Steingarten as needed. See, sometimes leftovers can be good. On eGullet, we look forward to leftovers!

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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As usual, I can't pass up an ice cream recipe. Will try it today and report back. Anyone who is also trying this must post so notes can be compared :wink:

Make sure to take some pictures, Ya-Roo.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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The vanilla gelato looks great even on its own. I'm intrigued by the use of the coffee bean.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Strain and imediately cool the mixture by placing it in an ice-bath or, alternatively, immersing an ice-pack (wrapped in a plastic bag) in the hot liquid. Chill the mixture overnight.

I am assuming that the mixture has to be frozen in an ice cream maker after this step. right? Just want to be sure.

looking forward for more leftovers

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I do think part of the vanilla gelato recipe is missing. Freeze it first and then freeze overnight or chill overnight then freeze in maker, then freeze again overnight?

Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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This is weird. I know that gelatos are typically made with a combination of milk and cream, but this recipe is all milk. I am having trouble cooking it to the right creaminess with the egg yolks. And, this recipe calls for 10 egg yolks.

The first attempt is a mixture that seemed to thin (may be this is right?) The second attempt yield a curdling result. Has anyone here had any success with making ice cream just out of milk?

Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

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This is weird. I know that gelatos are typically made with a combination of milk and cream, but this recipe is all milk. I am having trouble cooking it to the right creaminess with the egg yolks. And, this recipe calls for 10 egg yolks.

The first attempt is a mixture that seemed to thin (may be this is right?) The second attempt yield a curdling result. Has anyone here had any success with making ice cream just out of milk?

I have not tried it yet, but 10 yolks sound like enough to make a custard with a good creamy consistency. Do you have the Babbo Cookbook? He has several gelato recipes in there that you can use as a reference. I can check my book tonight to see if he uses all milk or milk/cream combo.

Did you try freezing the first mixture in a gelato/ice cream maker? If so, what happened ?

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Did you try freezing the first mixture in a gelato/ice cream maker? If so, what happened ?

Yes I did. It was crumbly. No texture. Will try again.

I don't have the Babbo cookbook, but I will stop by B&N to check it out tonight.

Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

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This is weird. I know that gelatos are typically made with a combination of milk and cream, but this recipe is all milk. I am having trouble cooking it to the right creaminess with the egg yolks. And, this recipe calls for 10 egg yolks.

The first attempt is a mixture that seemed to thin (may be this is right?) The second attempt yield a curdling result. Has anyone here had any success with making ice cream just out of milk?

Actually, there is a spectrum of milk fat percentages in gelati. In general, the farther south you go, the less fat... in some parts of Sicily, whole milk and that many egg yolks is considered very rich! I make gelati with just whole milk all the time, and much less egg.

For cooked custard bases, I've found that relying on a thermometer is much better then relying on thickness, coating a spoon, or whatever, to tell when it's done. I'm guessing the thin one you did was actually right. I think food safety people tell us to cook the base until 160 F. I trust my eggs and have no young children or immuno-suppressed folks in my house, so I tend to go to 150 F because I like the texture better.

regards,

trillium

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Tried it again last night, and got the milk to a semi-thick consistency. The ice cream is good but not great. It lacks the silky texture of a typical ice cream made with a creme anglais base. May be I shoud have left it on a tad bit longer. This mixture seemed to take longer to achieve creaminess and curdles much quicker.

Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

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I tend to go to 150 F because I like the texture better.

trillium, could you please elaborate on this one, please?

When i made the olive oil ice cream yesterday, i used your thermometer technique (double checking with coated spoon method).

The texture of the ice cream was nice and soft but i attributed it to the olive oil.

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Tried it again last night, and got the milk to a semi-thick consistency. The ice cream is good but not great. It lacks the silky texture of a typical ice cream made with a creme anglais base. May be I shoud have left it on a tad bit longer. This mixture seemed to take longer to achieve creaminess and curdles much quicker.

that is very wierd, I made the mix last night (actually half a recipe) and it was very thick. Thin consistency is definitly not my problem. I will freeze tonight and report.

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I tend to go to 150 F because I like the texture better.

trillium, could you please elaborate on this one, please?

When i made the olive oil ice cream yesterday, i used your thermometer technique (double checking with coated spoon method).

The texture of the ice cream was nice and soft but i attributed it to the olive oil.

I'm not sure what else to say. What are you wondering? I like the texture of ice cream or gelati that is cooked only to 150 F. It's a less thick base, and it makes a softer and to my tongue, cleaner tasting frozen confection. I really hate making an ice cream that leaves a coating of grease on the spoon or your palate. I also don't like that really strong taste of egg yolks you get when you cook them longer, but I like the emulsification you get when you use yolks. Maybe this is a problem for me because I'm using farm eggs, not ones from a grocery store. I found that when I do include eggs in my base just cooking the it to 150 and then chilling the base in an ice bath helps me avoid this problem. I don't like using all the stabilizers that restaurants use in their ice creams because I think you sacrifice flavor for texture. I think everyone's idea of what texture ice cream/gelati should be is a little different though.

regards,

trillium

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I really hate making an ice cream that leaves a coating of grease on the spoon or your palate.

i assumed that this unpleasant sensation comes from overworking the custard in the ice creamer, similar to the process of butter churning, but i need to experiment more to say this with certainty.

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Tried it again last night, and got the milk to a semi-thick consistency.  The ice cream is good but not great.  It lacks the silky texture of a typical ice cream made with a creme anglais base.  May be I shoud have left it on a tad bit longer.  This mixture seemed to take longer to achieve creaminess and curdles much quicker.

that is very wierd, I made the mix last night (actually half a recipe) and it was very thick. Thin consistency is definitly not my problem. I will freeze tonight and report.

Elie

The mixture froze perfectly in an ice cream maker. It was very smooth and rich. Here is a pic I took:

i10560.jpg

I only made half a recipe as a trial, using 5 yolks.

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Elie, did you add the coffee bean? Could you tell if it added anything to the flavor of the gelato?

I did add it and it was not a really detectable "coffee" flavor in the gelatto. However the ice cream did have a nutty/exotic flavor that I attributed to the coffee. Maybe it's on of those things where you would miss it if it is not there but cannot really taste it when it is.

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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