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jhlurie

TDG: The Indian Windex--Basil

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Although it's not blue, and you can't clean windows with it, Monica Bhide makes a compelling argument about how Basil is like Windex. However, you must have a copies of "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" cued up on your VCR or DVD player to read this article!

After returning from the video store, read on...

(P.S. - We're kidding. Read on anyway...)

* * *

Be sure to frequently check The Daily Gullet home page daily for new articles, hot topics, site announcements, and more.


Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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Monica, I always think about the ways in which your writing enriches TDG ... even for those of us not terribly familiar with India and its foods and customs (nor even the basil!) ...

How very beautifully and very touchingly you write! I am in such awe of your many talents! My favorite line is this:

And there it was: dried-up, shriveled and wasted, yet symbolically still fixed in an old terracotta planter . . . my grandmother’s tulsi. I could almost hear the ghosts giggling in the background as the dried leaves rustled about. 

Your highly insightful perceptions always make me smile, or laugh, or, on occasion, even cry .. you are a gifted woman! It takes one Gifted Woman to appreciate another! :rolleyes:

Thanks again for this piece! Keep writing!!

GG


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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very enjoyable piece.

wish the accompanying picture had really been of tulsi

rather than (what kind of) basil...

milagai

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very enjoyable piece.

wish the accompanying picture had really been of tulsi

rather than (what kind of) basil...

milagai

That is my fault. I could not find an accompanying pic so they did the best they could

sorry! Will try for better pics next time


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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once again Monica-enjoyed!the article also reminded me of a long running joke here-from the label on my pack of tulsi tea"tulsi reduces stress,enhances stamina,boosts immunity.......protects against radiation"!!

-standing instructions in the event of a nuclear strike-brew up some tulsi tea!

and if you're wanting your own doomsday pack,click here!

your grandma would approve. :laugh:

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very enjoyable piece.

wish the accompanying picture had really been of tulsi

rather than (what kind of) basil...

milagai

Unfortunately we couldn't find a royalty-free picture of tulsi, and didn't have a sample on hand to take our own photo. Also considered were photos of Windex, Monica's Grandmother, or a DVD of "My Big Fat Greek Wedding", but those had issues too. :hmmm: Only now does it occur that we COULD have just used a picture of a cup of tea. :wub:


Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

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I really enjoyed the article Monica. It reminds me of this woman in my old neighborhood , A devout Vaishnava, who cared for a beautiful Tulsi plant with much reverence. Besides doing Tulsi Puja, she would only use the leaves for adding to the water or decorating the sweets for the family Deities of Radha-Govinda. Did I mention DEVOUT?

I am surprised she even let me in the house, considering I am such meat/fishhead/onion-eating barbarian. She was very nice actually, and fed me delicious Gujarati veg food.

Edward


Edward Hamann

Cooking Teacher

Indian Cooking

edhamann@hotmail.com

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A very sweet and enjoyable article Monica. I could tell it comes straight from the heart.

I also love the line that Gifted Gourmet quoted.

very well done,

Elie


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Elie- what is deemed as the cure all in Lebanon?

and THANK YOU

At my house it was mint tea (mint steeped in boiling water) or yansoon (anise seeds steeped in boiling water).

At other families homes Zhoorat is very popular. This is usually a combination of spices and herbs including dried mint, anise seeds, cinnamon, rose buds, cloves among others. The whole mixture is also steeped in hot water.

Elie


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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very enjoyable piece.

wish the accompanying picture had really been of tulsi

rather than (what kind of) basil...

milagai

That is my fault. I could not find an accompanying pic so they did the best they could

sorry! Will try for better pics next time

You should have given a shout out... I'm growing green and red, and have the red dried on the branch too!

regards,

trillium

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What a beautiful tribute to your grandmother and to your culture, Monica! I'll echo the kudos that others have offered you; it was a great article. :biggrin:

An ex-bf of mine is Indian, and although he always touted the wonders of both garlic and ginger, I never heard about basil being a cure-all! Can you explain a bit about the difference between the basil that we know in the US vs tulsi?

Curlz


"I'm not eating it...my tongue is just looking at it!" --My then-3.5 year-old niece, who was NOT eating a piece of gum

"Wow--this is a fancy restaurant! They keep bringing us more water and we didn't even ask for it!" --My 5.75 year-old niece, about Bread Bar

"He's jumped the flounder, as you might say."

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Just guessing here: It sounds like Tulsi may be the same as the "Holy Basil" you get in Thai and Vietnamese restaurants. If so, if you've ever had Pho, you've tasted it.

Monica, could you grow Tulsi in Washington?


Michael aka "Pan

 

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Or New Jersey?!? :biggrin:


"I'm not eating it...my tongue is just looking at it!" --My then-3.5 year-old niece, who was NOT eating a piece of gum

"Wow--this is a fancy restaurant! They keep bringing us more water and we didn't even ask for it!" --My 5.75 year-old niece, about Bread Bar

"He's jumped the flounder, as you might say."

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very enjoyable piece.

wish the accompanying picture had really been of tulsi

rather than (what kind of) basil...

milagai

That is my fault. I could not find an accompanying pic so they did the best they could

sorry! Will try for better pics next time

You should have given a shout out... I'm growing green and red, and have the red dried on the branch too!

regards,

trillium

Its not too late.. can you please please post some???


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Just guessing here: It sounds like Tulsi may be the same as the "Holy Basil" you get in Thai and Vietnamese restaurants. If so, if you've ever had Pho, you've tasted it.

Monica, could you grow Tulsi in Washington?

You are right. Its holy basil

I have never tried it. The saying goes that not everyone can grow tulsi and given my ability to kill silk plants I should not even try this :laugh:


Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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