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Looking for certain dishes in Atlanta


gwilson
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I want to try a Japanese dumpling. I don't mean the type you'd get in soup or with noodles. (I don't think.) I mean the big ones that you'd usually eat by itself. I've never had one, but I've seen them eaten in movies, etc. So I have no idea what the name of them would be or anything like that.

I also want to find a (French) bakery that sells good savory pastries. Like a mushroom tart or an olive/onion mixture in puff pastry. I realize that most Amercians want something sweet for breakfast, which is why there are so many Danishes, muffins, etc. But I want something a little different - or a lot different.

Anybody have any suggestions? Thanks for the help.

-Greg

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I also want to find a (French) bakery that sells good savory pastries.  Like a mushroom tart or an olive/onion mixture in puff pastry.  I realize that most Amercians want something sweet for breakfast, which is why there are so many Danishes, muffins, etc.  But I want something a little different - or a lot different.

bakery

Australian Bakery Cafe: 463 Flat Shoals Ave SE Atlanta, GA 30316

Forget pot pies, these meat pies are addictive. Of the dozen or so, the savory steak and kidney with poppy-seed crust takes top prize; the curry lamb, a close second. Save room the sweets. Sherry-kissed, spicy fruit mince is loaded with currants and raisins. Bar-like cherry ripe slice looks like Neapolitan ice cream with its cherry, coconut and chocolate layers. The lamington, a springy sponge cake dipped in chocolate and covered with finely shredded coconut, is a true delight.

Savoury as well as sweet .. look interesting, gwilson? :rolleyes:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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I want to try a Japanese dumpling. I don't mean the type you'd get in soup or with noodles. (I don't think.) I mean the big ones that you'd usually eat by itself.

Sakana-ya Restaurant

This is their "noodle menu" which has several possible dumpling dishes, Greg ... it is just outside the Perimeter on Peachtree Industrial Blvd. and has lots of parking ... great dishes and atmosphere .. patronized heavily by Japanese businessmen at lunch ... read their menu and enjoy the music!

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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I want to try a Japanese dumpling. I don't mean the type you'd get in soup or with noodles. (I don't think.) I mean the big ones that you'd usually eat by itself. I've never had one, but I've seen them eaten in movies, etc. So I have no idea what the name of them would be or anything like that.

Anybody have any suggestions? Thanks for the help.

-Greg

I believe that you are describing gyoza - which I enjoy at Umezono, Windy Hill Road @ South Cobb Parkway (US 41) about a mile west of I-75.

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I want to try a Japanese dumpling. I don't mean the type you'd get in soup or with noodles. (I don't think.) I mean the big ones that you'd usually eat by itself. I've never had one, but I've seen them eaten in movies, etc. So I have no idea what the name of them would be or anything like that.

I also want to find a (French) bakery that sells good savory pastries. Like a mushroom tart or an olive/onion mixture in puff pastry. I realize that most Amercians want something sweet for breakfast, which is why there are so many Danishes, muffins, etc. But I want something a little different - or a lot different.

Anybody have any suggestions? Thanks for the help.

-Greg

As the previous poster mentioned, you're probably referring to "gyoza" but they're not big. They should be no longer than 3" and they're crescent shaped.

I know about gyoza 'cos my Mum makes them, dozens of them at a time.

Real gyoza should be cooked part fried, part steamed. Some Japanese and Asian restaurants take short cuts and the dumplings are simply fried but that's not correct.

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there's a viet-french bakery on roswell road if i recall correctly - give me a minute to find the name of it......the bakery gg refers to above is definitely very australian (not that there's anything wrong with that, but i'm guessing you want authentic french. i'm not sure we've got that besides la madeliene, to be honest)

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it's a good place - i like their meat pies - but it's basically that - aussie meat pies - unless they've changed things since last i was there (which was like 3 years ago)

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hmm..did some research myself and this is what i've got so far - can't say they'll have what you are looking for tho, but maybe if you call them and ask:

Highland Bakery

Alon's

Pastries a Go Go

Little European Bakery

you weren't kidding when you said we prefer sweets - i never realized the dearth of savory morning fare that doesn't involve cooking of animal byproducts. hmm.

Edited by tryska (log)
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Let me just point out (sorta off topic) that Alons is incredible.

Not only is he a great guy, but his bakery is just SO good.

All the baked goods are great (I like the raspberry wedding cookies), and they even have a deli. The roast beef sandwich (usually on the rare side, like I like it) is very, very tasty. It's also not too pricey. (But cakes can get expensive, fast)

Andrew Baber

True I got more fans than the average man but not enough loot to last me

to the end of the week, I live by the beat like you live check to check

If you don't move yo' feet then I don't eat, so we like neck to neck

A-T-L, Georgia, what we do for ya?

The Gentleman Gourmand

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First, thanks for the input from everyone. I do have an excuse for not replying sooner - I'm unemployed and broke. lol But this afternoon I did go to Australian Bakery Cafe.

I had an English pork pie, which was seasoned wonderfully. It smelled heavenly, and tasted quite good also. Alas, that was all I had. Their credit card machine was down, and since I only had $5 cash on me, I could only afford the one pie. It wasn't quite the savory/tart pastry that I'm searching for, but it's worth going back for.

Also, I haven't been able to get out to try any of the gyoza that people suggested, but will soon - promise. Even though I don't think that's what I'm looking for. Are gyoza like pot stickers? Not that I have anything against pot stickers, but I'm looking for something larger. What I've seen is more like baseball sized - even softball. And I imagine that you eat that one item as the whole meal.

Regardless, I appreciate the suggestions, and I'll keep you updated in my search.

-Greg

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Yes, gyoza are pot stickers.

I'm having some trouble envisioning exactly what you're talking about. You're sure it's Japanese? Try describing the shape, the contents, the type of wrapper (starch used and thickness and cooking prep).

You could try asking on the Japan forum, and once you've nailed down the item we can tell if we've seen it around.

Can you pee in the ocean?

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I gotcha.

Go to the Buford Highway Farmer's market. It's just outside the NE of the perimeter, on Buford Highway. Go all the way to the back where the seafood counter is. Face the counter. Turn left and walk past the freezer section, into where you see a square counter to your left, tofu to your right, and various kim chee in front of you. Face left.

The square counter area sells the huge (baseball sized) gyoza. Comes stuffed with chicken, pork, or kim chee mixed with ground pork. Any of the three are delicious, and they are sold by the half dozen. If I remember right, they're about a buck apiece, and they'll sell it to you uncooked, frozen, or freshly steamed. They are all handmade right in front of you.

They also sell other Korean, Latin American, Chinese and Japanese foods there...take a look at the Japanese sushi section opposite the seafood counter-it's a rainbow of different sushi types. Friday's the best day to go, everything is fresh.

I warn you, however, the place is HUGE.

If you're there on a Saturday, and you see a 40-ish Chinese guy with size 54 shoulders, and a six year old son in tow (Daddy, can we buy some more crawfish?), say hello. I'm probably there with the family on my bimonthly restocking-the-freezer trip. :smile:

If that's not what you were looking for, let me know. You might be talking about the steamed buns which are typically filled with sweet bean paste, cooked roast pork, or stuffed with raw meat (pork, egg, chinese sausage) and steamed until done. The first two are available at the chinese bakery across the street from the 99 Ranch Market on Buford Highway. No clue on the latter, I don't think I've seen the Sa Knuo Pao (Shanghai translation, sorry) for sale in Atlanta.

Edited by Singapore (log)

Be polite with dragons, for thou art crunchy and goeth down well with ketchup....

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Short of physically putting the giant gyoza into gwilson's mouth, you have very likely nailed it for him! I know that your description made me salivate and, since I live not too far from there, I plan to explore the market myself .. like this afternoon actually!!

Thank you, Singapore, for your very clear directions .. better than a gyoza Mapquest guide! :biggrin:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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<Quote: Everything Singapore said.>

OMG! I'm so hungry now! Fortunately I have an impromptu anitpasti platter to be scarffed. (Sopprsata, proscuitto, chevre, pickles of some kind, heirloom tomatoes, and what ever else I can find.)

Singapore, thanks a lot for the tip. I have errands to run tomorrow, so I think I'm going to go by there then. I've always wanted to go there, but my knowledge of Asian cuisine is practically nil. And I don't speak a word of any of their languages. But I guess this is a good opportunity to dive in.

Therese, it's hard for me to describe because I've really just seen the items in movies and things like that - never in person. The most recent example - and it's not a very good one - is in Spirited Away. About a quarter/third of the way through the movie, the little girl/main character is sitting on a patio and another girl brings her something to eat. The girl says, "I brought you a dumpling." But it's a translation, so it could really be a bun or something else.

I actually started this 'quest' a long time ago, but gave up for lack of resources. The scene in Spirited Away (which is an incredible movie anyway - if you haven't seen it, rent and/or buy it) reignited the 'dumpling desire' as I have coined it. I'll keep you guys posted on my search.

-Greg

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"Spirited Away" is a cartoon, right?

Anyway, if you haven't yet posted on the Japan forum I would once again suggest doing so. Use the scene in the movie as a reference point.

Can you pee in the ocean?

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Thank you, Singapore, for your very clear directions ..
Singapore, thanks a lot for the tip.

No problem, guys! If you enjoyed that, let me know, and I'll tell you where the Chinese Food Court/Chinatown is. Cheers!

Be polite with dragons, for thou art crunchy and goeth down well with ketchup....

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"Go to the Buford Highway Farmer's market. It's just outside the NE of the perimeter, on Buford Highway. "

I love that place! A chef friend of mine calls it "a Toys 'R' Us" for chefs. The prices are very good and they have every thing. The only problem I have w/ the place is that some times the language barrier can be a problem but there is usually some one there to help translate.

If they combined that w/ Harry's bread, cheese, & wine selections it would be ideal.

in loving memory of Mr. Squirt (1998-2004)--

the best cat ever.

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You're dead on about Harry's. Buford is very much an Asian/Latin American food market.

You won't find sourdough or French baguettes here. Wine and traditional gourmet items (Fois gras, caviar, etc.) are also rare. You've got some basic cheeses, but it's going to be Latin American rather than European style.

What you will find are bundles of sage, oregano, mint, and other unidentifed fresh spices going for a buck. Quarts of fresh bing cherries will be sitting next to Korean star fruits, in turn sitting next to papayas, right next to the occasional Durian. More bins filled with citrus, pears, and apples....

You'll browse through row after row of vegetables, such as bags of Shanghai bok choi, bundles of potato leaves, grape leaves, stacks of chives and green onions, and even a rack of Aloe plants still in their growing pots....an entire row of hot peppers, from jalapeno to scotch bonnets...potatoes, bins of onions and shallots, Japanese button mushrooms, white mushrooms, portobella mushrooms, and prepackaged tofu.

I promise you that you'll see at least three vegetables/fruits that you've never heard of or handled before, even if you're Alton Brown. :biggrin:

The bakery is small, but you can get a nice gingerbread pig there to keep the baby quiet as you shop. The Cuban sandwich rolls are good too, as is the bread pudding.

If you're there on a weekend, chances are you'll come across a stand by the dried Latin American spices and stacks of tortillas, where young women present you with samples of quesadillas. Brace yourself as you go through the meat section, not only will you find all parts of the cow and pig, but mutton and goat as well.

I've already described the seafood and Korean sections in an earlier post. One note: you can pick up a lovely Salmon head for next to nothing. Split it, broil it, and into a clay pot it goes with some green onion, tofu, soy sauce, mushrooms, bean sprouts and Shanghai baby bok choi, a dash of wine, salt and pepper to taste, put it on a low flame for an hour and a half. You'll have a fish soup that kings would kill for.

As you walk towards the front of the store, you'll find dried and prepared Asian and Latin American foods to the left, and rack after rack of Asian cooking gear, cutlery, platters, bowls and plates. To the far left will be a Korean video rental store, and closer to the front will be Chinese redwood furniture, grass mats, fans, and clothing.

Then you will come to a checkout counter battery that makes Sam's Club look miniscule by comparison. Don't forget to show your receipt to the Korean chap near the exit. If you hit certain price levels, you get free packets of ramen, pantyhose, plastic ice trays, etc..

Oh, right next to the exit, there's a Hispanic snack shop that sells soda, popsicles, roasted corn and what looks like waffle nuggets. I have no clue what it's called, but I ate some and it was good.

I think the best way to put it is if you're Asian or Hispanic, you will find something here that will remind you of the food Mom made for you at home. If you're not Asian or Hispanic, welcome to an incredible (and crowded) potpourri of food experiences.

Hope to see you there! Cheers.

Edited by Singapore (log)

Be polite with dragons, for thou art crunchy and goeth down well with ketchup....

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