• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
rajsuman

Indian Cookbooks

93 posts in this topic

Here is my list of Indian cookbooks- not in any particular order.

1. The Indian Vegetarian by Neelam Batra

2. Chilis to Chutneys - Neelam Batra

3. Curried Flavors - Maya Kaimal MacMillan

4. Savoring the Spice Coast of India - Maya Kaimal

5. Turmeric Trail - Raghavan Iyer

6. Indian Regional classics - Julie Sahni

7. Classic Indian Cooking - Julie Sahni

8. Art of South India Cooking - Alamelu Vairavan & Patricia Marquardt

9. Healthy South Indian Cooking - Alamelu Vairavan & Patricia Marquardt

10 Aharam - Sabita Radhakrishna

11. Samayal - Viji Vardarajan

12.Laxmi's Vegetarian Kitchen - Laxmi Hiremath

13. The Indian Spice Kitchen - Monisha Bharadwaj

14. A taste of Madras - Rani Kingman

15. Amma's Cookbook- ammas.com

16. Dakshin - Chandra Padmanabhan

17. 101 Kerala Delicacies - G. Padma Vijay

18. Modern Kerala Dishes -Mrs.K.M. Mathew

19. Fresh Flavors of India - Das Sreedharan

20. The Cooking of India - Santha Rama Rau

21.The art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking - Yamuna Devi

22 - 24. Cook and See- Traditional South Indian Vegetarian Recipes (three volumes) by S. Meenakshi Ammal

25. Tasty 200 - Kuppammal G. Nayagam

26. Tasty treats from South India - Krishna Kannan

27. Southern Delights- recipes to Remember from Palakkad - Parvathy Akhileswaran

28- The Spice is right - Monica Bhide

29.The Everything Indian Cookbook - Monica Bhide

30. Curries and Bugles - Jennifer Brennan

31The Essential Kerala Cookbook - Vijayan Kannampilly

32. Cuisines of India - Smita Chandra

Cookbooks in Malayalam:

Grihalakshmi- Nalini Sreedharan

Paachaka Kurippukal – Rugmini Veeraraghavan

Nammude Nadan Karikal – Suma Sivadas

Indian Food related books:

The story of our Food – K.T. Achaya

Indian Food – A Historical Companion – K.T.Achaya

A Historical Dictionary of Indian Food – K.T.Achaya

The Hour of the Goddess – Chitrita Banerji

Bengali Cooking- Seasons and Festivals – Chitrita Banerji

Anthropology of Sweetmeats - Anil Kishore Sinha

I also have a collection 120 International cookbooks.

Ammini


Ammini Ramachandran

www.Peppertrail.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also have a collection 120 International cookbooks.

Ammini

Being a Cabinetmaker by trade I could probably make quite a few bucks building sturdy bookcases for some of the gargantuan cookbook collections described in this thread :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

721! Long time no hear Ammini. jw46, the way my cookbook collection is expanding, looks like I'm going to need another bookshelf.

Suman


Edited by rajsuman (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bought Monica Bhide's Everything Indian and Suvir Saran's Indian Home Cooking today.

More later, when books get delivered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just doing an edit on this post

I could not get my hands on The turmeric trail, Ain e akbari – abul fazl, Oxford companion to food and Historical companion to Indian food by Achaya (though Vikram has promised to help me out with atleast a couple of those....

I did get Ultimate Curry Bible, Vikram also gave me Food in History - R. Tannahill

So my total stands at 19. (Total cookbooks number 36.) Will recount post the birthday...

Rushina

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bought Monica Bhide's Everything Indian and Suvir Saran's Indian Home Cooking today.

More later, when books get delivered.

The books arrived!

And the cover of Indian Home Cooking is even better look then what you see on amazon.com.

The colors are just so fresh and indian and also have good feel and look. Book looks more like table top book for design accent. I know gf will want to decorate side table with the book. I have quickly read through book. Could not stop myself from wanting to see all photographs. One more better than the previous. It beats Methome actually, I hope I do not get Suvir into trouble with editors there. Both very different really. Book is competing at same level as the bigger name chef books, I am sure Suvir pay more money for photograph then he makes from book. It will make big difference. I showed my neighbor the book and he could not believe this was Indian food. So different from restaurant and other book stuff he said. And yes so true.

Monica, thanks for so many recipes. I will give your book to colleague that want to see the books I rave about. I get into trouble with gf if I give away both books. I know she wants to see them too. Methome story has made us very proud. Thanks.

Will cook from books and say more later. You all make us proud.

Suvir, your book will have us hungry, you write well (with Stephanie) and share good stories about your dishes. And your food is like home food we eat as my family traveled all across India and Middle East. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a question for Monica:

what do you think of the "50 Curries" cookbokbook by Camelia Punjabi?

Is it authentic Indian cuisine?

I was thinking of buying it.

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Essential Goa Cookbook, The - Maria Teresa Menezes I don't know why, I didn't like this much. Goan cuisine is really delicious and historically very interesting because of the fusion between so many cultures - Portueguese, Hindu, Muslim. There is a long and lively Goan tradition of appreciating and writing about food. Menezes somehow doesn't do this justice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've finally got down to doing a count - ok, it was a good excuse to arrange this book shelf :laugh:

164 Indian cookbooks (I'm not including ones on Asian cooking that include a chapter on Indian cooking - I have about 30 of those!) and 4 on their way...

Edited to add these books are in English, French, Hindi and Marathi (I'll soon be adding Dutch to that list)...


Edited by bague25 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm +2 myself - both of them Monica's books. From what I've seen so far (only got them yesterday), they deserve every bit of praise they've received and then some. These and bague25's books brings the total so far to trrrrrrraaaarrrraaannnn.......

901! :cool:

Imagine having all those cookbooks in one place!

Suman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just added two to my collection- The new Tastes of India by Das Sreedharan and Purba: Feasts from the East by Laxmi Parida.

Ammini


Ammini Ramachandran

www.Peppertrail.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I now have 20 books on Indian Cooking, added the 50 curries book. I highly recommend it!

Rushina

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

905! Come on guys, let's make it a thousand before the end of this year! There, I've provided the excuse....not that anyone here needs one to buy cookbooks.

Suman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel like such a rank amateur with my paltry collection of Indian cookbooks. I think I have 6 or 7, including Monica's Everything Indian, one Madhur Jaffrey, Curries and Bugles, and one called Mughal Microwave.

I have about 300 cookbooks in all, a goodly amount of which feature chocolate :)


Kathy

Minxeats
http://www.foodloversguidetobaltimore.com/'>Food Lovers' Guide to Baltimore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

912! Kathy, I wouldn't call myself a chocoholic (although I go through these phases in life when I don't feel secure without a box of ferrero rocher(sp?) in the house) and yet I find that of all the cookbooks I own, the chocolate ones are the most seductive. You can't open one without instantly wanting to make or at the very least eat something chocolatey. Mmmmm chocolate - what's not to like?

Suman


Edited by rajsuman (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mmmmm chocolate - what's not to like?

Believe it or not, there are people out there who don't like chocolate! Strange but true! Not in my household though...both DH and I adore it.

Any way to get chocolate in an Indian dish? I was thinking maybe something akin to a molé dish. Not authentic, of course...but trying to keep to the thread here ;)


Kathy

Minxeats
http://www.foodloversguidetobaltimore.com/'>Food Lovers' Guide to Baltimore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll add my two! The Everything Indian Cookbook by Monica Bhide, have you heard of her? :biggrin: And I couldn't help it, I got another book, From Curries to Kebabs by Madhur Jaffrey. I don't know if I get to count that as an Indian cookbook because she also includes recipes from Asia and Africa etc. (from the spice trail). But she is Indian and there are many Indian recipes in the book so I think it should count! My next purchase will probably be Monica's other book...and I'm embarrassed but I can't think of the name of it right now. :unsure:


Edited by RSincere (log)

Rachel Sincere

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By sartoric
      I make this a lot. Traditionally served with dosa, but great with all kinds of Indian food, even just scooped up with bread or pappads for a snack. Although it's slightly different every time, depending on the tomatoes and chillies used, plus the strength of the tamarind, it's easy, quick to make and always delicious.
       
      In a blender - half a medium red onion chopped, 7 dried red chillies broken up a bit, 2 ripe tomatoes chopped, 1 tsp of sea salt, 3 tsp tamarind paste.

       
      Whizz until purée like about 2 minutes.

       
      In a sauté pan over medium heat add 60 ml sesame oil (gingelly), when it's hot but not smoking add 1 tsp black mustard seeds.   

       
      Quickly cover the pan to prevent escape and sizzle for a minute.

       
      Add 1 tsp of urad dal (black lentils, skinned and split they are light grey).

       
      Fry until golden, another minute or so.

       
      Throw in about 20 curry leaves. These splatter so cover the pan again. 

       
      Lower the heat and add the  blender contents.

       
      Simmer, stirring frequently for about 10 minutes, until you get a runny jam consistency.
       
      Ta da !

    • By Luke
      Every now and again I come across a recipe that is awesome.
       
      It started with a discovery in my local South Indian take away near work. This is a true South Indian place, not your usual run of the mill Indian restaurant which we get around here.
       
      In the bain marie was a red, slightly oily, dry spiced chicken dish scattered with onions and green coriander. A dish with no name. I asked what it was, and they replied it was "spicy chicken". I bought some and I was hooked.
      It was obviously a favorite of patrons as there was never a day when this dish was not in the bain marie and it sold out quickly.
       
      Here is my take on that recipe, which I believe is called Double Chilli Chicken. 
       
      Apologies in advance, but I dont work to quantities when cooking. Hopefully you can make your own judgement but just ask if you want more clarification. 
       
      The ingredients you will need are:
      - oil or ghee (mustard oil if my wife is giving me grief over health, ghee for best flavor)
      - Chicken mini drumsticks (about 1kg) 
      - About 3 brown onions, cut in half and then sliced (red onions would be better, but I only had one for garnish)
      - Salt
      - About 20 curry leaves
      - Sliced ginger
      - Sliced garlic
      - 10 to 15 whole dried chillies (I remove most of the seeds)
      - Ground dried chilli powder (medium hot)
      - Ground coriander
      - Ground black pepper
      - Jaggery or Palm Sugar
      - Lime juice
      - Chopped fresh coriander for garnish
      - Chopped red onion for garnish
       
      I start with a heavy base fry-pan that has a fitted lid and add the ghee.
       

       
      Choose a dried whole chilli of your liking and remove most of the seeds, as they can burn and become bitter. 

       
      Saute your dried chillies in the ghee for a few minutes

       
      You will notice they start to darken quickly
       

      Don't let them burn, but take them a bit darker than shown in the photo above and then remove into a spare bowl to cool with a slotted spoon. You can leave the ghee and seeds. Quickly add the onions to stop the remaining seeds from burning. Add salt to help the onions cook.
      I should have also added the curry leaves to the oil first, but I forgot so I added them later.
       

      As the onions soften on the heat, finely julienne some fresh ginger and slice some garlic. Exact quantities dont matter so adjust to your preference. 
       

      Add the garlic, ginger and chillies to the pan once the onions soften and take on some colour
       

      After a few minutes of cooking out the garlic and ginger, add the ground coriander and chilli powder. Again, exact quantities don't really matter but I used about 1 Tablespoon of each. What matters more is the quality of the ground powders. The coriander is ground in my coffee grinder just before use, and I make my own chilli powder from dried Spanish Padron chillies I grow each summer. If you can, always make your own ground spices. For the ground chilli powder, remove the seeds before grinding as you will get a redder product.
      A quick word on chillies : There are hundreds of varieties, but I choose the Spanish Padron due to the balance between heat and flavour. I want an intense chilli flavour without searing blow your head off heat, and this chilli has that right balance. 
       

      Stir the powders into the onions and cook for a few minutes.
       

      Add the chicken and arrange such that the chicken has good contact with the bottom of the pan. We need this to get the meat to release its own moisture, which is what makes the sauce and prevent the dish from burning
       

      Cover with a lid and lower the heat. After 5 minutes you should notice some liquid from the chicken. This increases to a maximum around 15 minutes. Stir every 5 minutes but don't remove the lid until 15 minutes have elapsed.
       

      While the chicken is cooking, prepare some jaggery or palm sugar and squeeze the juice out of one lime.
       

      After 15 minutes of cooking with the lid on, remove the lid, add the jaggery and lime juice, and now increase the heat. What we are going to do is evaporate the remaining liquid and turn it into an awesome sauce that sticks to the chicken.
      For another 10 minutes, you will need to pay careful attention to ensure the dish does not stick and burn. You need high heat to help caramelize the sauce and constant movement. Taste for seasoning. Add extra salt, lime juice and heaps of black pepper.
       

      Prepare some slived red onions for garnish.
       
       

      And some roughly chopped green coriander. This stuff grows like a weed in my garden as I let the kids loose with the seeds and they scatter them far and wide!
       

      Serve the chicken on a bed of steamed basmati rice
       

      And garnish with onion and coriander. Serve and enjoy with a glass of cold beer. Awesome stuff!
       
      Cheers
      Luke
       
       
       
       
       
       
    • By CanadianSportsman
      Greetings,

      I've cooked several recipes from Keller's "Bouchon" the last couple of weeks, and have loved them all! At the moment (as in right this minute) I'm making the boeuf Bourguignon, and am a little confused about the red wine reduction. After reducing the wine, herbs, and veg for nearly an hour now, I'm nowhere near the consistancy of a glaze that Keller specifies. In fact, it looks mostly like the veg is on the receiving end of most of it. Is this how the recipe is meant to be? Can anybody tell me what kind of yield is expected? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you, kindly. 
    • By sartoric
      We're 50 something Aussies who enjoy travelling, eating, cooking, markets, kitchen shops, cooking utensils, animals & plants (often food related), architecture & photography (both kitchens and food) and exploring different cultures (of which food is a big part). The trip was January 14 - February 6, it was just marvellous. My favourite meal is now masala dosa with sambar, I had many. Here's some highlights of the food.
       
      A late afternoon snack of Sichuan pepper squid was washed down with a beer at the Ajantha Seaview Hotel on the promenade in Pondicherry. It's a colonial building with a first floor terrace overlooking the colourful display of women in their finest, and the Bay of Bengal. We're here on a Monday public holiday for the Pongal festival, a four day celebration of the harvest, with many different ceremonies and traditions.
       
       

       
      A visual bonus, cows (and sometimes goats) get their horns painted and wear flower garlands or other decorations.

       
    • By Paul Fink
      This unfortunately titled book changed my life. I always enjoyed cooking and idealized Julia Child &
      Jacque Pepin. But I was a typical home cook. I would see a recipe and try to duplicate it little understanding about what I was doing.
       
      Cooking the Nouvelle Cuisine in America talked about a philosophy of cooking. It showed me that there is more depth to cooking. A history. A philosophy.
      The recipes are very approachable and you can make them on a budget from grocery store ingredients. I read it as a grad student in Oregon, in the late 80's I had access to lots of fresh ingredients. And some very nice wines, cheap! I was suppose to be studying physics but I end up learning more about wine & cooking.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.