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Gotta New ISI Dessert Whip


Richard Kilgore
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One thing you can do (that isn't mentioned in the instructions or on their site) is make "fizzy" fruit. I think I saw it on the ideasinfood blog.

Put small fruit (like grapes) or cut up larger pieces so they fit through the opening of the charger. Screw on the top, charge the canister (I use CO2 from the soda syphon - same size as the nitrous cartridges for whipping cream) and leave in the fridge for an hour or so. Release the pressure, unscrew the top, and remove the fruit. It will have a weird fizzy carbonated taste. Kind of fun. :biggrin:

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I received as a gift an iSi Mini Whip half pint whipped cream maker.  Is there anything else I can do with it?

I gather that one can 'whip' rather than 'churn' an ice cream mixture. (And freeze the foam.)

Question: Is this a reasonable alternative to an ice cream maker?

(I'm looking for more justification for buying one!)

You'd probably have to drastically change your ice cream recipe..? I'm guessing you won't get the right desirable ice-cream consistency, even if you could do this.

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I'm hoping this group has tons of ideas for creatively using the ISI Whipper I got for the holidays. Do you have a great savory foam recipes? Any interesting twists on sweet ones? Any thoughts on a low fat foam using coconut milk????

---------------------------------------------------------

"If you don't want to use butter, add cream."

Julia Child

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi Everybody,

Does anyone use a iSi whipper in their pastry work? If so what do you make?

How is this model better than other basic whip cream dispensers that are cheaper?

From Williams-Sonoma website:

iSi Thermo Whipper

Having originated in Spain, the intensely flavorful, sweet or savory whipped foams called espumas have become popular on restaurant menus worldwide. Our vacuum-insulated whipper is the first designed for making these hot and cold foams in the home kitchen. Using N20 cartridges (sold separately), it can aerate pureed mixtures of fresh fruits, herbs, vegetables, seafood and meat into varying consistencies: firm (for mousse), creamy (for whipped cream) and liquid (for soups, sauces and gravies). The whipper’s contents will remain cold for up to eight hours, or hot for up to three hours, which allows prep work to be completed well in advance. It has a capacity of one pint for making up to 2 1/2 quarts of aerated foam. Included are three decorating tips to dispense whipped foods in attractive patterns, a recipe book and complete instructions. Dishwasher safe. 13 1/2" high. A Williams-Sonoma exclusive.

$150.00

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One thing you can do (that isn't mentioned in the instructions or on their site) is make "fizzy" fruit. I think I saw it on the  ideasinfood blog.

Put small fruit (like grapes) or cut up larger pieces so they fit through the opening of the charger. Screw on the top, charge the canister (I use CO2 from the soda syphon - same size as the nitrous cartridges for whipping cream) and leave in the fridge for an hour or so. Release the pressure, unscrew the top, and remove the fruit. It will have a weird fizzy carbonated taste. Kind of fun.  :biggrin:

So you just whack your CO2 cannisters directly into the ISI whipper? I've been wondering whether that would work, but had stuck with fizzing fruit in a big old soda syphon for fear of screwing up my beloved whipper.

restaurant, private catering, consultancy
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With the fizzy fruit, I've found that 2 x C02 canisters makes a small handful (eg. ten small ones) of grapes wonderfully fizzy. Filling to the third or half way mark requires more canisters - the grapes are still carbonated, but not as fizzy. Once the canisters have been inserted, I leave it to chill in the fridge for a couple of hours before using.

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I'm hoping this group has tons of ideas for creatively using the ISI Whipper I got for the holidays.  Do you have a great savory foam recipes?  Any interesting twists on sweet ones?  Any thoughts on a low fat foam using coconut milk????

Rick Tramonto's Amuse Bouche recipe book has some savoury foam recipes (blue cheese, potato and vanilla,...).. but I haven't had a chance to try them out yet. At my work, we've used a coconut foam, vanilla, and almond milk foam for various things in the pastry section. At home, I've substituted ordinary milk for low-fat, lactose-free milk, so I guess it's possible to make low fat foam.

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  • 1 month later...

Tom that’s a great link, thanks.

I’ve tried the patatas (good but tends to be a little on the gelatinous side of nice), mayonnaise (hot – fantastic with asparagus) and gin fizz – the gin fizz is now an absolute favourite, albeit I use the recipe from the Cook’s Book which uses a gin/lemon sorbet under a hot gin/lemon foam.

I also use the cream whipper for making batter as in Heston Blumenthal’s book, In Search of Perfection.

Strangely, I have never used it for whipping cream.

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  • 1 year later...
One thing you can do (that isn't mentioned in the instructions or on their site) is make "fizzy" fruit. I think I saw it on the  ideasinfood blog.

Put small fruit (like grapes) or cut up larger pieces so they fit through the opening of the charger. Screw on the top, charge the canister (I use CO2 from the soda syphon - same size as the nitrous cartridges for whipping cream) and leave in the fridge for an hour or so. Release the pressure, unscrew the top, and remove the fruit. It will have a weird fizzy carbonated taste. Kind of fun.  :biggrin:

Pomegranate is perfect for this. You can nearly fill the 500ml canister, use one CO2 cartridge, leave it for a few hours, and it's very very fizzy.

gallery_28691_4819_54730.jpg

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  • 7 months later...

Since some of the links referenced at the beginning of this thread are now dead--

There is an English translation of the basic outline for making espumas from the Adrià pamphlet here--

http://www.espumas.at/preparations/the-espuma-method/en/

Click on "Preparations" on the left side for other useful suggestions, and click on "Recipes" for, well, recipes.

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  • 1 year later...

Finally got the hook up on an ISI so I can do new dishes for my dinners.

150g foie gras (I used the trimmings from a torchon)

1/3C duck demi-glace

1/3C cream

I heated up the demi and poured into a blender, added the foie a little at a time and mixed in the cream at the end, seasoned with salt and charged.

Fioe gras mousse, toy box tomatoes, riesling gelee, walnuts and root beer syrup.

4974802343_d70796d129_z.jpg

Edited by ScottyBoy (log)

Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...

Chef Facebook HQ Menlo Park, CA

My eGullet Foodblog

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Finally picked up a 500 ml ISI, and am looking for things to do with it as a home cook (not that the discussion should be limited to home cooking applications). Beyond the five mixtures suggested in the booklet that came with it, what have you tried that works out well? Any other general advice, applications or ideas will be appreciated.

Over in the infusions thread, we're discussing using nitrogen cavitation with the ISI whipper to do (near) instant infusions.

Richard, I know you're really into tea. Matt Kayahara said he did a tea infusion this way. I'm keen to hear your thoughts on that.

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I want to try this, but lack the equipment you have. I think I saw it first on the Spain No Reservations episode. Aerated spongecake batter nuked in a plastic cup and torn up to resemble fluffy coral for a dessert plate.

It's better demonstrated if you can find the No Reservations clip.

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Finally picked up a 500 ml ISI, and am looking for things to do with it as a home cook (not that the discussion should be limited to home cooking applications). Beyond the five mixtures suggested in the booklet that came with it, what have you tried that works out well? Any other general advice, applications or ideas will be appreciated.

Over in the infusions thread, we're discussing using nitrogen cavitation with the ISI whipper to do (near) instant infusions.

Richard, I know you're really into tea. Matt Kayahara said he did a tea infusion this way. I'm keen to hear your thoughts on that.

Thanks, Kent. I'll check it out.

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  • 7 months later...

I got one of these since I saw a few items in MC that use one.

Last night I made a basic chocolate mousse and Thomas Keller's Watercress mousseline. For both of them it was incredibly hard to get it to come out properly. Even with the lightest touch on the trigger it came out with a ton of pressure that made it near impossible to shape into anything other than a blob with a whole in the middle where the pressure dug into it. I was holding it upside down, using a light touch and charged with one canister. Does anyone have any ideas what I might be doing wrong? It's almost like it was forcing out as much air as it was foam (even while inverted).

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I've always been curious about these things because they seem pretty cool. From my understanding you fill the canister with liquid, then charge with N2O, shake and it will release a foam on command. When charging it takes one full iSi N2O cartridge even with smaller sizes, correct? This seems pretty wasteful. Is there another way to charge them (or can you use less then one full cartridge to load a canister)?

Also, I was wondering about sizing. For someone making dishes for two people, sometimes four, is something like this worth the money and will the smallest size (half a pint?) be too much or too little?

Thanks

Andrew Vaserfirer aka avaserfi

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You probably have seen them in coffee houses used for whipped cream. Often it is recommended that you use two cartridges, sometimes one is sufficient. iSi does have a book I purchased which is both helpful and interesting called 'The Trick with the Whip' - it is short and done in a ring binder fashion.

"A cloud o' dust! Could be most anything. Even a whirling dervish.

That, gentlemen, is the whirlingest dervish of them all." - The Professionals by Richard Brooks

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  • 2 months later...

I just bought one of these at a garage sale (four dollars!), but have had limited success. I've tried a few recipes, and I can't get a really deep chocolate flavor out of any of them - I'm looking less for chocolate milk and more for a fluffy ganache. I also suspect they'd benefit a great deal from a stabilizer (perhaps a little gelatin?)

Also, can anyone suggest an online retailer that's cheap and trustworthy? I'm told that some of the "ISI" cylinders sold online are knock-offs intended for stoners that can smell a bit whiffy.

Edited by jrshaul (log)
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