Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

What to do with trout?


spicegirldc
 Share

Recommended Posts

gingerly, that sounds yummy and baked too! Considering mild, subtle dishes are not usually my style unfortunately, this is probably more in line with what my guests are probably expecting! Thanks a ton for the link. Its going to be either this or the watercress & lemon cream sauce which is making my mouth water so..

Will try my best to post pics tomorrow :).

-w@w

Edited by worm@work (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

you could also do a potato with the trout and watercress and lemon cream sauce...but it is 100 degrees where I live, and the thought of putting anything blazing hot in my mouth sounds horrible...that is why I suggested the cold salad.

Good luck, and remember: as long as YOU'RE impressed with it, it doesn't REALLY matter what anyone else thinks...hehehe

"Make me some mignardises, &*%$@!" -Mateo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know if it would work with steaks, but there's a great recipie in Lynne Kasper's "other" book (The Italian Country Table). Basically, you cook down thin sliced onions very quickly (with garlic, sage, and rosemary), then hit them with some red wine vinegar and simmer for a couple of minutes, then set aside to cool. Put more garlic/sage/rosemary inside the trout and cook them off in a pan. Then bury the trout in the onions and leave them for at least 30 min.

Not only is it delicious, but it saves you the last minute cooking if you're having people over.

Andrew Riggsby

ariggsby@mail.utexas.edu

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 years later...

The top one is a brook (speckled) trout, the middle one is a rainbow and the bottom one is a lake trout.

Those are some lovely looking fish.

Edited by Trev (log)

There are 3 kinds of people in this world, those who are good at math and those who aren't.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although I prefer to do this head-on, it should still work: lightly sprinkle salt and pepper and fill the cavity with small wedges of lemon and one or more fresh herbs. Wrap loosely (but sealed) in aluminum foil. Cook open a campfire or bake in the oven. Easy and delicious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

back in the day I used to fly-fish those would have been in the pan within a few hours.

I used to leave the head on, but open down the middle and carefully take out the frame.

a couple of thin slices of lemon and fresh herbs in the middle, then roll in thin cut bacon of good quality streaky is good maybe tie up

and pan saute in a heavy cast iron skillet. outdoors if you can.

then you inhale them.

lucky you!

using the same initial cleaning, they are very good stuffed with a light bread crumb white wine garlic stuffing I used to like to add small shrimp and fresh herbs.

as long as you do not over cook them you cannot go wrong!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although I prefer to do this head-on, it should still work: lightly sprinkle salt and pepper and fill the cavity with small wedges of lemon and one or more fresh herbs. Wrap loosely (but sealed) in aluminum foil. Cook open a campfire or bake in the oven. Easy and delicious.

I tend to start the same but then pan fry both sides until crisp and then bake until cooked. After removing the fish from the oven and then the pan, I make a sauce with shallots, butter and olive oil, white wine and lots of drained capers. finish with more butter. Pour on fish. One of the wife's fav dishes.

I'm still working on not getting the skin to stick to the pan during the pan frying stage. I use a non-stick, I shake the pan a lot. I've tried a dusting of flour on the skin first. Most of the time it still sticks. :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry. Yes, take the fillet off both sides (you can leave the skin on, then eat it or leave it on the plate according to taste).

Ok, thanks.

I love, love love the skin......hmmmmmmmm.....makes my mind wander to Scotty's chicken skin chips....

The top one is a brook (speckled) trout, the middle one is a rainbow and the bottom one is a lake trout.

Those are some lovely looking fish.

Thank you for the clarification. I lump them all into "rainbow" lol.

Although I prefer to do this head-on, it should still work: lightly sprinkle salt and pepper and fill the cavity with small wedges of lemon and one or more fresh herbs. Wrap loosely (but sealed) in aluminum foil. Cook open a campfire or bake in the oven. Easy and delicious.

Sounds nice, simple and good. Will the skin stick? Should I spray with Pam or use some butter?

back in the day I used to fly-fish those would have been in the pan within a few hours.

I used to leave the head on, but open down the middle and carefully take out the frame.

a couple of thin slices of lemon and fresh herbs in the middle, then roll in thin cut bacon of good quality streaky is good maybe tie up

and pan saute in a heavy cast iron skillet. outdoors if you can.

then you inhale them.

lucky you!

using the same initial cleaning, they are very good stuffed with a light bread crumb white wine garlic stuffing I used to like to add small shrimp and fresh herbs.

as long as you do not over cook them you cannot go wrong!

My step dad fly fishes too! I'm not skilled enough to go that route. I'd hook myself and flip over.

Mmmmmm bacon....I hadn't thought of that, but YUM.

Although I prefer to do this head-on, it should still work: lightly sprinkle salt and pepper and fill the cavity with small wedges of lemon and one or more fresh herbs. Wrap loosely (but sealed) in aluminum foil. Cook open a campfire or bake in the oven. Easy and delicious.

I tend to start the same but then pan fry both sides until crisp and then bake until cooked. After removing the fish from the oven and then the pan, I make a sauce with shallots, butter and olive oil, white wine and lots of drained capers. finish with more butter. Pour on fish. One of the wife's fav dishes.

I'm still working on not getting the skin to stick to the pan during the pan frying stage. I use a non-stick, I shake the pan a lot. I've tried a dusting of flour on the skin first. Most of the time it still sticks. :(

See, I'm afraid of sticking, too and I don't want to waste of that skin 'cause I love it.

Capers sound great.

Such great ideas, everyone I thank you and keep 'em coming if you have 'em.

I'm thinking I can trade some of our venison for more fish. :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try frying the fish in plenty of butter. Add a small handful of almond slivers to the pan towards the end of the frying time. Squeeze some lemon juice over the almonds during the last minute or so of cooking. Serve the fish and pour the almonds, butter and lemon juice all over. You want the almonds looking golden and toasty - the lemon juice will help this.

This is dead simple and really tasty.

Edited by fatmat (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mmm, those look lovely. I have two ways to do trout, both really simple. In warm weather I use the outdoor grill. I salt and pepper the cavity and the skin (a little paprika is nice, too), and just make sure to oil the fish and the grill well. It does tend to stick a little, especially if the grill wasn't brushed clean well enough, and doesn't always come off the grill looking pristine, but it's presentable. I don't have one of those folding fish holder thingies for the grill, but for delicate fish that might come in handy.

When I don't feel like grilling I saute in butter. I use a heavy cast-iron skillet, generous amount of butter, and cook the trout slowly; when they are done the skin is a bit crispy and you can use the pan juices for a buttery sauce. If you cook them gently on a low flame they don't tend to stick.

Sometimes I do what Richard does, which is slice up some lemons and put them in the cavity, often with a sprig of fresh thyme or rosemary. I never bother to bone the fish before cooking, it's really easy to lift the entire bone structure out in one piece afterwards. None of my guests have ever complained about having the bones in, but we don't have state dinners here. The plainer the better. Just about my favorite fish.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My mom and dad were campers/fishers and trout was (hopefully!) always on the menu. The favorite way to cook them right out of the river was to first fry up some bacon in a heavy cast iron skillet. Roll the fish in some corn meal with some salt and pepper. Set aside the crisp bacon, then fry the corn-dusted fish in the bacon fat until crisp on both sides. Remove the bone and serve. You can serve the bacon slices on the side. Lemon wedges if you have them.

Just recently got a Spanish cookbook out of the library -- imagine my surprise to see this same recipe in it. Just in time to cook some trout from the supermarket!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm so jealous, I love fresh whole trout.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. Per trout: 1 clove finely minced garlic. 1-2 leaves fresh sage leaves, cut into chiffonade. Lightly salt and pepper the interior of each fish. Rub with a bit of olive oil. Sprinkle garlic and sage inside, press closed. Rub exterior with some olive oil, pan fry or grill until the skin is crispy.

The interior heat and moisture will make both the garlic and sage soft and will perfume the flesh beautifully. Perfection by itself. For a variation, crisp some pancetta (no need to use salt, then), add thin strips with the garlic and sage.


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whole trout was the first fish I ever cooked. The wonderful fish guys at Grand Central Market in downtown L.A. took me under their wing - showed me how to bone it, but also explained how easy it was to dissect after cooking -peel off skin, lift off fillets and zip out the main bone structure. They told me to keep it simple. I either baked it after stuffing cavity with lemon and herbs and setting a pat of butter inside and on top, or pan fried in butter and served with a generous squeeze of lemon and a scattering of parsley. Enjoy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

I am very lucky to have numerous hunting/fishing friends. I have soo much moose, elk, venison, wahoo, tun in my freezer. I know what to do with that. But i have trout personn

Now. Whole trouts, gutted. I have 30 plus. What to do? They wont eat a fish servedsk

And head. I will smoke some

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now I have trout envy :shock:

Hot smoked trout is excellent. I haven't heard of it being cold smoked. What size are the fish you're getting ?

Plantes Vertes is right about almonds - you can equally well fillet, coat with almonds and shallow-fry. Breadcrumb-coating and shallow/deep frying also work well. Personally I'd kill for some good fresh trout just to salt lightly and grill with a little lemon & parsley butter in the cavity.

On the trout farm where I worked part-time in my student days, one of the guys ate a whole live trout for a dare, head and all, but there's no need to go that far.

  • Like 1

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...