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Lemon Chiffon Cake


Wendy DeBord
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Do you find chiffon layers sink under filling?  I'd like to fill this cake with lemon curd (posted on the Lemon Curd thread, looking for a firm-ish curd) and some sort of lemon cream. 

But when I once filled a chocolate chiffon cake with mousse etc. the layers compressed - maybe I'd done something wrong - but it's scared me a little off filling chiffon cakes.

What's the secret, if there is one?  If I were to fill the centre with a curd and a cream, and top it again with cream and curd, do you think RLB's chiffon cake would stand up under it or compress or slip under all that weight?  And, how many layers do you think I could reasonably create (looking at 3) without having layers slip out from underneath?  Remembering the tropical heat I'm working in averages about 30 - 33 deg C.

As I recall, this cake was more than sturdy enough to support some lemon curd.

Great picture and Thanks.

I am bad at foam cake and would like to try this...

what pan did you bake in? and what is the approximate height of the finished cake?

Any warning before i jump in?

Thnks

Sorry I missed your questions, iii_bake.

I baked this cake in a 10" tube pan.

The finished cake is about 4.5-5" tall.

Tips: seperate your eggs while they are cool, but beat your whites at room temp. Fold the ingredients together gently, but also make sure you do it thoroughly -- the batter should look homogenous -- no streaks or egg whites or of the flour mixture. Don't open the oven til your ready to test the cake for doness, and when you do that, be quick. Don't put the tube pan on top of a baking sheet as an insurance policy against drips -- air needs to be able to circulate through the middle of the tube pan. That's all I can think of. Good luck!

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Do you find chiffon layers sink under filling?  I'd like to fill this cake with lemon curd (posted on the Lemon Curd thread, looking for a firm-ish curd) and some sort of lemon cream. 

But when I once filled a chocolate chiffon cake with mousse etc. the layers compressed - maybe I'd done something wrong - but it's scared me a little off filling chiffon cakes.

What's the secret, if there is one?  If I were to fill the centre with a curd and a cream, and top it again with cream and curd, do you think RLB's chiffon cake would stand up under it or compress or slip under all that weight?  And, how many layers do you think I could reasonably create (looking at 3) without having layers slip out from underneath?  Remembering the tropical heat I'm working in averages about 30 - 33 deg C.

As I recall, this cake was more than sturdy enough to support some lemon curd.

Great picture and Thanks.

I am bad at foam cake and would like to try this...

what pan did you bake in? and what is the approximate height of the finished cake?

Any warning before i jump in?

Thnks

Sorry I missed your questions, iii_bake.

I baked this cake in a 10" tube pan.

The finished cake is about 4.5-5" tall.

Tips: seperate your eggs while they are cool, but beat your whites at room temp. Fold the ingredients together gently, but also make sure you do it thoroughly -- the batter should look homogenous -- no streaks or egg whites or of the flour mixture. Don't open the oven til your ready to test the cake for doness, and when you do that, be quick. Don't put the tube pan on top of a baking sheet as an insurance policy against drips -- air needs to be able to circulate through the middle of the tube pan. That's all I can think of. Good luck!

Got it. Thanks, Patrick.

I will go thru the recipe and start right away (with crossed fingers).

iii :smile::smile::smile:

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Dear Patirck,

Again, Thanks for the advice.

The chiffon is now hanging on the bottle neck!

I was so ignorant that i put the cake on the middle rack...it was too close to the top heat and the cake burnt on the top. The batter fills to the rim of the mould...is it supposed to be so?

When in the oven, it rose about an inch, back to the rim when took out.

Is this normal?

Like i said, i am totally blank about foam cake.

I use silicone flute mould. Hope i can take it out successfully.

I am happy with my first attempt so far.

Thanks

iii

:smile::smile::smile:

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:sad::sad::sad:

Here's the result:

The cake finished almost 4 inch tall with burnt top and stuck bottom

I have no removable bottom pan so i used silicone one.

I got it from Crate n Barrel...but the cake stuck!?!

What do we do with this type of mould though if you cannot remove the cake easily?

What should i do? ( of course i will find the removable one....but what about this silicone thing?)

Sad-O-Sad, kindly help

iii

:sad::sad::sad:

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:sad:  :sad:  :sad:

Here's the result:

The cake finished almost 4 inch tall with burnt top and stuck bottom

I have no removable bottom pan so i used silicone one.

I got it from Crate n Barrel...but the cake stuck!?!

What do we do with this type of mould though if you cannot remove the cake easily?

What should i do? ( of course i will find the removable one....but what about this silicone thing?)

Sad-O-Sad, kindly help

iii

:sad:  :sad:  :sad:

Something has gone very wrong if the top of the cake is burnt -- either the oven is too hot, or you've baked too long.

Personally, I have not had favorable experiences with silicone cake pans, except for my silicone loaf pan, which I mostly use to mold fudge and things like that. If I were you, what I would do is chill the cake in the frudge, then use a plastic knife or something like that to try to free as much of the cake from the side of the pan as you can. For the bottom of the cake, I guess all you can really do is reach your hand in there, and try to pull it from the bottom as best you can. If you mangle the cake, you can always cut off the top and bottom.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I'll add my 2 cents here - skip the silicone. Get a metal tube or angel food cake pan. The cake will stick to the pan. That's what you want, which is why you need a removable bottom. Sticking to the pan is what helps keep it high. After cooling upside down, I also like to refrigerate it for a while before removing. Then I slide a thin blade around the outside and the inside of the cake and gently push the bottom up.

The silicone mold would be better suited to a coffee cake than a chiffon cake - a recipe that calls for greasing/flouring.

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Thanks Patrick & Pam.

I have to go get the removable one.

In the meantime, i guess i have to look for foam cake recipe that can be baked in nine inch spring pan to give myself a go on the foaming technique. That is the only one with removable bottom i have.

Thanks again.

iii :huh:

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if your tube pan is silicone and you have the sides loosened, don't be afraid to turn the whole pan completely inside out (like a sock) to get to the bottom, that's what it's made to do. That the top of the cake burned is more of a concern, maybe you need to lower the oven shelf to compensate for the height of the pan...

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  • 3 years later...
Do you find chiffon layers sink under filling?  I'd like to fill this cake with lemon curd (posted on the Lemon Curd thread, looking for a firm-ish curd) and some sort of lemon cream. 

But when I once filled a chocolate chiffon cake with mousse etc. the layers compressed - maybe I'd done something wrong - but it's scared me a little off filling chiffon cakes.

What's the secret, if there is one?  If I were to fill the centre with a curd and a cream, and top it again with cream and curd, do you think RLB's chiffon cake would stand up under it or compress or slip under all that weight?  And, how many layers do you think I could reasonably create (looking at 3) without having layers slip out from underneath?  Remembering the tropical heat I'm working in averages about 30 - 33 deg C.

As I recall, this cake was more than sturdy enough to support some lemon curd.

I was wondering if anyone had any other experience with this...I will be making this for the first time in my life for my Mother in laws birthday. Chiffon cake with lemon curd filling. I can't find a copy of RLB's, so i will find a recipe on the internet. But I suddenly became worried that just any recipe, might actually sink. Does any have any experience with that happening or not happening?

Also any recommendations for an icing or frosting?

Thank you in advance...

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Patrick, I have a question for you. When you use Herme's lemon creme on the Chiffon cake, isn't the lemon creme a little too runny to be applied as a frosting?

The lemon cream firms up to about the texture of mayonnaise.

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I followed Patrick's suggestion of using lemon creme and so far I am letting things cool.

My question is, after I inverted the cake on a bottle, 12 minutes had passed and while I making the lemon creme, the cake fell out of the pan. Not too much damage, just a bit of the side of the cake, stuck to the side of the pan. Is this normal?

Edited by oli (log)
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