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Restaurant Eve


mnebergall
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We finally made it to Restaurant Eve and it was worth the wait! We sat in the tasting room on Friday and had the 5-course tasting menu. Now when I initially made the reservations it was either 6:30 or 9. I made the 6:30 but was wondering if maybe that was a little too early but the pacing of the meal was perfect and we were there until about 10. Since we were there for our anniversary, I thought it would be best if I didn't drag out a notebook and start taking notes. Therefore I will do my best to recall everything but can't guarantee that I won't miss a point or two. The hard thing about the 5 course is that you have to choose - and they are not easy choices. I started with the lobster creme brulee which was unlike anything I've had before and was just amazing. It consisted of a creme brulee of lobster including the hard caramelized shell on top, a small "salad" of lobster meat and braised fennel with a lime vinegrette (I think) and three small dollops of a sauce with lobster roe in it. The creme brulee was smooth as silk and was not dominated by any one ingredient and the carmelized sugar on top was a nice counterpoint to the savory filling. The salad was incredible - the lobster meat was some of the sweetiest I've tasted and the fennel was perfectly braised. I have to say that I was as excited to experience the wine list and meet Todd Thrasher as I was to have the food and Mr. Thrasher did not disappoint. I started with a glass of sparkling wine from South Africa (my own choice) and it was pretty good. I chose it simply because I had never tasted a sparkling wine from South Africa and was not disappointed. It was a nice match for the lobster and is definitely something I would have again. The second course was a fish (sorry I can't remember the kind) "en papillote" - French was not my language so I apologize for any misspellings or buthering. It was simply done with just some fennel, squash and white wine and was superb. The fish was steamed nicely but not overly so, the veggies were tender to the bit and the flavors melded perfectly. I don't remember the wine that I had with this. I put myself in Mr. Thrasher's hands for the rest of the night and it was the right choice. The next course was a rabbit stew served in a small squash - great presentation. The stew was, of course, delicious. It also had some squash in it, and some other veggies too. The broth was flavorful and viscous. Mr. Thrasher at first suggested a Cote du Rhone. When I asked him what he would have with this dish he said the same wine but when he came back he had two half glasses. One was the wine he recommended and the other was another Cote du Rhone with a different blend. They were both fantastic but very different (one was very fruit forward with dominating cherry flavors and the other had very earthy, smoky flavors) and both were a great pairing with the rabbit. The cheeses were next and as cheese hounds, my wife and I were very much looking forward to this. Despite loving cheese, I know very little about cheese and about matching wine with cheese. So, again, I turned to Mr. Thrasher for recommendations. Since I still had a good amount of both wines left, he suggested that instead of the offered cheese that I have their cheddar cheese soup with two small triangles of a grilled ham sandwich. My wife ordered three of the cheeses - she asked for the stinky selection. :blink: They were all good but I don't remember what they were. My cheddar cheese soup was all cheddar and no soup. I think our server put it best when she said "it's like fondue in a cup." It was like they had taken their best quality cheddar and added just enough of whatever they use so that it doesn't congeal. It was cheese heaven! Finally it was time for dessert. This was perhaps the toughest choice to make on the menu as I wanted to try every single thing on there. In the end I chose the Mojito and my wife had the chocolate cashew tart with cashew(?) ice cream. wow! The mojito was kind of like tiramisu I guess with cake soaked in mojito covered in a chocolate mint shell that was amazing. And it came with a small mojito which was great and inspired me to fine tune my mojito recipe. My wife's dessert was just as good as mine and I would've been just as happy with that as I was with the mojito. If my dessert had not come with alcohol, I would've ordered one of the delicious sounding Cidercars (kudos to Iamthestretch for the name). In fact I plan on going back after work this week just to try one. In addition to the five courses there were also three amuses that came out - the first was a selection of small appetizers including the deviled quail's egg which lived up to its description. The second was a soup that came out between the second and third course. For the life of me, I can't remember what the soup was but I think it was a squash. Whatever it was, it was the most decadent, delicious, cream-laden soup I'd ever had. The final amuse came out after dessert and it was a selection of small finger desserts including a small eclair, a toile cookie and a shortbread. A great way to end dinner. Through all of this, the service was perfect - friendly, attentive but not obtrusive. We never had to wait for water or bread or anything but our server was not hovering over us either. The pacing of the food was just right. I was also lucky enough to have a chance to talk briefly to Mr. Thrasher right before we left and it is great to see someone who loves their job so much. It makes all the difference in the worth. Thanks to all at Restaurant Eve for a great dinner.

"See these? American donuts. Glazed, powered, and raspberry-filled. Now, how's that for freedom of choice."

-Homer Simpson

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  • 3 weeks later...

I stopped by bar at Restaurant Eve yesterday evening for a libation before the football game and was enticed by the wild venison on the specials menu. Let me tell you, it was unbelievably good. A couple of medallions of perfectly crusted, rare-medium rare venison loin atop one of Chef Cathal's special underlings. The underling included wild huckleberry preserve, some sautéed swiss chard, some yellow squash matchsticks, combined to deliver an unctuous blend of late summer/fall flavors. My advice, call and see if he has any left and if he does, run, don't walk.

Capped it off with the toffee dessert, unexpectedly good. Just ax Rocks, I gave him a bite (it was his helping of the venison that enticed me, they had to give me a napkin to wipe the drool off of my chin).

P.S. A new tasting room menu is due out very soon.

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Alert, Alert, Alert:

Todd Thrasher has been sleeping overtime and has dreamed up a new concoction that will be unveiled next weekend: "Hot" Chocolate.

PS:

Alas, the tomato water Bloody Mary's are now out of season.

But, CiderCars are still available.

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So, yesterday, my SO got a super, you-are-special raise and bonus. To celebrate, she took me to dinner at Eve. Poor thing, I had to leave her to marry the lamb I had for dinner.

It was a lamb-tasting special, see, with braised shank, roasted loin(? leg?), short-ribs, and a single chop served with a buttery, quartered brussels sprout, some potatoes awash in lamb jus, and a bit of rapini that almost made me do Things One Does Not Do in Public. It was one of those wonderful meals that makes you cry at the very first bite because you know, with a sickening certainty, that there will come a last bite, and the idea of continuing to live after the meal is gone is a bitter, bitter fate not to be wished upon the lowest telemarketer. I actually asked our waiter to kiss the chef for me; sadly, our otherwise accomodating waiter seemed a bit thrown by that idea. But, O! this lamb. The shank was pulled from the bone and finely shredded, and tasted like it had been cooked for hours in the very essence of lamb. The short-rib was crispy outside, tender within, and rivaled the very best rib experieces I've ever had. The loin/leg bits were very very good, but were completely overshadowed by the lamb chop.

Now, I've eaten rack of lamb and lamb chops in myriad places, and I enjoy it very much. But, hell, a lamb chop is a lamb chop, right? There's not much you can do to make a lamb chop a religious experience, and, to boot, I was so in love with the shank and the rib that I figured the chop was destined to be an also-ran. I was stunned by this chop. It was as though the cute but mousey girl in English Class took off her glasses, let down her hair and revealed herself to be the most stunning exemplar of the female form ever to have existed, and then turned out to be able to quote Shakespeare from memory, read Samuel Beckett for fun, and think Black Adder the funniest thing ever, excepting, maybe, you (warning: Your fantasies May Vary). This chop, this noble-but-destined-to-be-slightly-dull chop, was the very Platonic form of lamb. The first bite had me going through ecstasies St. Teresa of Avila would envy. This trend continued to the point where I went totally fucking feral and began gnawing the bone. In public. In a fine-dining restaurant. Grunting as I gnawed.

My girlfriend had the salmon. It was very good, but it was no lamb. I also had mussels, which were very, very good, but they were no lamb.

If you have the time, go to Eve. Find out if the lamb special still lives, or if it was a one night stand. If the lamb special continues, order it. At all costs, anyone who likes food MUST HAVE THIS LAMB.

Go. Eat. Quickly, you fools, before the lamb is gone!

PS: the seasonal cocktail, a lime and Absolut Citron concoction sweetened and colored with mashed pomegranate seeds, is also pretty damn cool.

A jumped-up pantry boy who never knew his place.

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Tried the "hot" chocolate last night. Wonderful blend of heat on the back of the tongue from whatever it is that Todd puts in it to give it that kick, with a creamy white chocolate drink. I can't wait for it to be about zero outside to come back and try one.

PS: fimbul's lamb will be back on the menu Monday evening. Anyone care to join me at the bar after work?

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Also there last night in the bar, snacking and sucking down a bottle of Rudera chenin with the spousal unit. Stellar cured salmon and game terrine, amongst other goodies. And a proper sticky toffee. God save the inventor of the sticky toffee.

Jake Parrott

Ledroit Brands, LLC

Bringing new and rare spirits to Washington DC.

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The lamb 4-ways--What fimbul said. The risotto, unbelievalbe. Made with a carrot stock and laced with walnuts and apples. Great with the lamb special. Once again, I will order the bacon, egg and cheese salad as long as it is on the menu. Ran out of time to have a "hot"chocolcate; had to get home to watch the Chiefs on Monday Night F-Ball.

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The lamb 4-ways--What fimbul said. The risotto, unbelievalbe. Made with a carrot stock and laced with walnuts and apples.  Great with the lamb special.  Once again, I will order the bacon, egg and cheese salad as long as it is on the menu.  Ran out of time to have a "hot"chocolcate; had to get home to watch the Chiefs on Monday Night F-Ball.

That white hot chocolate is, like, the opposite of scuba diving in Fiji, in the very best way. I imagine pefection on a night like tonight.

...

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All pig, all the time: Eve's awesome new rillettes, followed by Eve's trusty braised pork belly, followed by Birthday Cake 7.0 (ask them to make it with lard.) Rumor has it Todd is working on a warm bacon vinaigrette cocktail to take care of the liquid angle.

"Mine goes off like a rocket." -- Tom Sietsema, Washington Post, Feb. 16.

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If the Christmas Goose special is available, go for it. It's absolutely delicious. Breast meat with crisped skin that crackles and shatters covering succulent slices of rare flesh. The sliced breast sits atop a bed of cabbage, carmelized apple, mushrooms, and confited leg of goose. Really a spectacular dish.

Tony

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  • 3 weeks later...

Missed the goose, but was consoled by an all-fat-immersion evening tonight: pork rillettes followed by crispy confit duck leg and apple fritters with caramel dipping sauce. Accompanied by two bottles of surprisingly good Italian Pinot Noir to keep the plaque from the arteries. Another high point, the tipsy gentleman who tripped at the top of the bathroom staircase and hit every single step on the long, steep slide back down into the Bistro. Bravo, sir.

"Mine goes off like a rocket." -- Tom Sietsema, Washington Post, Feb. 16.

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Stretch:

Too bad you missed the goose. I had it the week before Christmas. When they brought it out I told them that they had made a mistake, I ordered the goose not the venison. It came out rosey red on the inside and crispy on the outside as goose breast is dark meat not white. The only goose I have had before had been wild canada; Chef Cathal's version of the proverbial "Christmas goose" was wonderful.

Did you get a chance to try the "hot chocolate?"

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Following is a review of Eve's Tasting Room, Dec. 30. This is my first time posting here, and I originally posted the review on the "doggy" site, but given the EVE-focus of this forum and the presence of Armstrong, Thrasher, et al, I think it might find more interest here. Please forgive me if this unappropriate or against the rules.

***********

On December 30 my wife and I took my parents to Eve in Alexandria for their forty-ninth wedding anniversary. It was my first time at this restaurant, and I was eager to taste what the buzz was about. We were not disappointed. Although not perfect, Eve was a memorable dining experience. It is especially gratifying to be able to say this about a local restaurant that has been open for less than a year.

We ate in the Tasting Room, where my father and I had the nine-course, my wife and my mother the five-course menu. I started with an aperitif, the “New Age Gibson,” made with Bombay and garnished with plump pearl onions infused with saffron. Like much of the food that would follow, it was a witty and carefully prepared riff on a classic preparation.

The amuses let us know immediately that we were in the hands of an imaginative chef with a well-schooled crew: delicately blanched leaves of Brussels Sprouts filled with an aromatic mushroom duxelles, deviled quail eggs topped with osetra caviar, a little button of foie gras mousse studded with a spiced apple compote of perfect, tiny dice. All left us eager to see what would come next.

My parents and I started out with the lobster crême brulée I had read about so often. The little timbale of lobster custard with its sugar glaze was presented attractively on a long, narrow platter together with a few morsels of lobster garnished with a fennel compote and tarragon vinaigrette. Unfortunately, it seemed that someone in the kitchen had applied the blow torch a bit too long to my example, so half the custard had liquefied. Despite this last-minute mistake, the combination was inspired and the flavors were spot on. The anise tones of the fennel and tarragon paired beautifully with the lobster cream, and this pairing in turn was enhanced by the sweetness of the sugar glaze.

Meanwhile, my wife had chosen the marinated kampachi for her first course. The single slice of fish was served carpaccio style, “cooked” only by its marinade of anise and licorice. It was a simple presentation in which bright and bracing flavors showed up the freshness and sweetness of the fish.

The nine-course continued with “OOO” (oysters, osetra caviar, and onions). A creamy blanquette of caramelized onions and caviar enrobed the delicately poached, succulent oysters atop a light tartlet shell. The flavor and fragrance reminded me of a rich and luxurious version of the humble Alsatian tarte flambée. What impressed me most about this dish was how the chef showed an unfussy respect for the natural flavors and quality of his ingredients while combining them with ingenuity and flair--really the essence of all great cooking.

For our third course my father and I had the terrine of moulard duck foie gras with fig jam. I don’t think the chef was intending an Alsatian theme of any kind, but this dish, like the “OOO,” reminded me of Alsace, because the last time I had such a carefully prepared and flavored foie gras terrine was in a restaurant tucked away in the foothills of the Vosges. Eve’s was dense, rich, luscious, and everything else you would expect a traditional foie gras terrine to be. The presentation, with sticks of brioche toast, was also traditional, but this garnish lacked the eggy richness that makes brioche such a beloved accompaniment to foie gras terrine. The fig jam was bright and deeply flavored; the chef’s judicious use of jams and fruit compotes would prove to be a delightful thread throughout the evening.

For their second course, my wife had the ahi tuna with braised oxtail, rapini, and celery root, and my mother had the pan roasted onaga snapper with cauliflower panna cotta. The snapper was also the fourth course for my dad and me. Both it and the ahi tuna were faultlessly prepared. The piece of lightly seared tuna I tasted was of such high quality I would almost have preferred it raw, but then I would have had to forgo the sumptuous reduction of oxtail broth and aromatic winter flavors that accompanied this dish. The snapper was a morsel of succulent, deeply flavored fish with crisply seared skin sitting atop a disk of cauliflower panna cotta just firm enough to hold its shape. The sauce was a fragrant lobster cream. This talk of panna and cream might make this dish sound heavy, but, as with the “OOO,” the subtlety and simplicity of the flavors and the judicious portioning of the components kept it light and appealing.

Eve’s wine list is arranged by style rather than region or grape variety, something I don’t care for but which I suppose has its merits. It is also very eclectic, a quality I admire but that puts me and my admittedly Eurocentric wine preferences at a disadvantage. Despite this, the wine we had been drinking until now was a no-brainer, a Riesling from Zind-Humbrecht. It was a near perfect accompaniment to the foie gras terrine as well as the tuna and snapper dishes, and as the food was creating all manner of Alsatian associations in my mind it could not have been a better choice. For the upcoming sweetbread and game dishes, however, I wanted a “Burgundy,” and sommelier Todd Thrasher suggested an Oregon Pinot Noir, Soter Beacon Hill. This wine turned out to be a highlight of the evening--all the rich berry overtones of an old-school Burgundy, and every bit as worthy.

The Soter sang with the fifth course on the nine-course menu: veal sweet breads with caramelized apple and Calvados. The veal was an exquisite, fluffy, juicy morsel, lightly dusted with panade and fried with the utmost delicacy and respect for the texture of the meat. The apple and calvados-infused sauce paired magnificently with the sweetness of the sweetbreads while carrying through the fruit flavors that had already appeared in a number of dishes.

For their third course my wife had the seared venison loin and my mother the roasted guinea hen with cabbage and quince. The latter was an attractive and traditional presentation, with the leg meat in a little galantine. The skin was beautifully crisped, though the meat in the one bite I tasted was a tad overcooked. The sauce, a reduction with cabbage and quince, again brought out this chef’s use of fruit flavors to brighten traditional combinations and styles. The same could be said for the venison, which was also the men’s sixth course: a perfectly cooked morsel of the highest quality presented with a simple demi-glace flavored with huckleberries and chestnuts.

The women then had a selection of artisan cheeses, which I did not sample but which by all accounts were good and presented well (i.e., at the right temperature). The seventh course for my dad and me was the cheddar soup with Irish bacon sandwich--a tiny tureen of soup accompanied by a little canapé-sized sandwich. Here, the attempt at a witty quotation of an old favorite (“ham and cheese”) fell flat, and the dish was a dullard compared to the smartness and light touch of all the others that had preceded it. Despite the small portions, the oily grilled sandwich and the saltiness of the smoked meat and cheddar soup were heavy going this late into the courses.

At this point Todd Thrasher came to our table to wish my parents a happy anniversary and present them with a few gifts. To our delight he also brought us a round of the famous “Hot Chocolate." All I can say is that this ideal winter warmer, an alcoholic concoction of peppers and chocolate, lives up to the pun of its name and epitomizes the witty and imaginative style of Eve.

The eighth course for my dad and me was house-made yogurt with caramelized pear--a refreshing and tangy palate cleanser that again demonstrated the chef’s use of caramelized fruits and compotes to heighten the interest of individual dishes while conveying a sense of continuity in the overall menu.

For desert came a “gift box:” A small chocolate box topped with a tiny golden sugar ribbon and filled with a creamy chocolate-hazelnut ganache. It was executed with technical skill worthy of a first-rate Brussels confectioner. I ended the meal with a 1995 Madeira that helped me reflect on everything that had come before it.

A few quibbles about service in addition to the food-related ones already mentioned: Both bottles of the Zind-Humbrecht we ordered were underchilled, even though I mentioned this problem to Mr. Thrasher after the first bottle. (Could this be an example of overcompensating for the widespread tendency to serve white wines too cold, somewhat like mistaking undercooked vegetables for al dente?) Our welcome was a bit confused. On leading us to our table the hostess suddenly said, “Hold on!” and left us waiting while she backtracked to talk briefly with a colleague. I think the welcome of a restaurant is like the handshake of a first acquaintance, so this made me feel a bit uneasy. At our table, service sometimes appeared uncoordinated or impromptu, though otherwise professional and solicitous. These are probably nothing more than wrinkles that will be ironed out once the team finds its rhythm.

People in the Washington metropolitan area are fortunate to have Eve in their midst. This culinary treasure is easily one of the best restaurants on the East Coast. Get there as soon as you can.

Don’t you have a machine that puts food into the mouth and pushes it down?

--Nikita Khrushchev to Richard Nixon during the "Kitchen Debate" in Moscow, 1959

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The Bistro Menu has changed up again as of this past Wed. Several highlights from the last few days include a tremendous braised shortrib done with red wine and served with root vegetables, a Portugese style fish stew with chorizo and tripe that is lick-the-bowl good and a butter poached cod filet with lobster and lobster cream that is love on a plate. Several other changes in garnishes, etc., such as substituting yorkshire pudding for the pommes mousseline that accompanied the ribeye, and the monkfish being done with the "clam chowder" finish that has been on the menu previously, though I think with cod.

Tony

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Ahh, shortrib, just in time for the cold weather. I had a chance to sample the venison from the tasting menu the other evening. Paired with a morsel or two of stilton cheese with a wonderful venison jus, absolutely outstanding. Unfortunately, the "hot" chocolate is no longer.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I had a chance to sample the new beef shortrib on Eve's Bistro menu the other evening. A great choice for combating the current spate of cold weather. Served with root vegatables and pommes mussolini (did I spell that right?). The shortribs are a dark choloclate in color and perfectly braised what with all the colagen converted to gelatin. Mmmm, they melt in your mouth and warm you up.

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We visited Restaurant Eve last evening with another couple with very high expectations given all the “hype” we have heard about the place. Unfortunately we left with the feeling that RE was a bit more hype than substance.

RE is a very attractive spot and a very comfortable place to enjoy a meal. We dined in the bistro at a very comfortable table. From the start service appeared a bit stretched due either to a lack of staff, or the fact the staff was not performing at the level one would expect. The service issue was an irritation throughout the evening as water glasses went empty, we resorted to pouring our own wine at times and bread was MIA. Our waiter was a nice young man but clearly his mind was else ware this evening given he was apparently moving on to work elsewhere in the near future.

The food was good with the oxtail raviolis getting high marks and the bacon, egg and cheese salad being nice, but not all that special. For dinner the short ribs were very good, the bouillabaisse on a par with most others at decent restaurants. The rockfish was very nice and prepared perfectly.

The desserts were fine. We had the chocolate offering which was average, the fritters, which were quite good, and the crepes which were very good. The best offerings of the evening were Todds green apple cocktail and the hot white chocolate cocktail. Again, good food… but not at the heights we had our expectations at.

The disaster of the night was the wine service. The young lady who is the part time sommelier was weak from knowledge level and a bit over the edge in terms of implied self-importance and talent. She made a recommendation on a cab, but failed to inform us that it was their last bottle. The bottle was then placed in the ice bucket, which none of us noticed?? Given our concern with the abilities of this young lady we asked Todd to recommend a pinot which he did.. it was excellent. He does know his wines. Well back to the cab…. first off all our cab glasses were empty and not a soul seemed to notice. We were pouring the pinot ourselves as the bottle was on the table. We asked our waiter for the cab, which he found in the ice bucket!! Clearly, at 35 degrees it was of no use to us.

About 10 minutes later the sommelier put a bottle of wine on our table and then headed off somewhere. A few minutes later she returned and was about to open the bottle when we asked why it was not the same… reasonable question. We were informed that they were out of cab and this was the replacement chosen for us ….a cab merlot blend from South Africa. Asked why it was selected we were told it was in the $59 price range and the rest of the California cabs were higher priced… as if a great favor was being done for us. She did not offer to let us taste it and pass on it if it was not acceptable… she just said this is what we picked. We said that was not really an acceptable solution… as we would have expected that they offer another bottle of the pinot. She then left with the wine shaking her head…. As my daughter does when she does not get her way. In any case very unprofessional and immature. It would be the last we saw of her.

Once again we had to ask our waiter what happened to the wine…after a long wait Todd showed up with the same bottle and offered to let us try it and if we did not like it they would provide something else. At this point no one in our party really cared given the handling of the situation so we just drank what we were given. Todd did provide us with the remaining cab to take home with us… a nice gesture on his behalf.

Overall the food was good, not great and the service was lacking. Todd appears to be a fine gentleman, but IMO he needs to significantly raise the bar with his staff and pay closer attention himself to the “details” of resolving problems of their own making at the moment they occur. Possibly it was just an off night but we will most likely not return

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As I am sure you are aware, restaurants, and individuals, sometimes have bad nights. Even the world's greatest establishment's slip up in the way they respond to these occasional "bad nights".

I have had the pleasure of eating at Eve on several occasions. Give them another chance, I'm sure they won't disappoint.

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Saturday evening I was having dinner at the bar at Restaurant Eve, and at one point I saw Todd walking into the bar area towards me, shaking his head, with a shellshocked look on his face.

"Do you mind if I start a thread on obnoxious customers who walk into restaurants?"

"Not at all," I replied. "but it should go on General Food Topics, since it isn't specific to DC & DelMarVa."

"Oh, yes it is," he said. "It's happening right here, right now, and we're going to be slammed on eGullet tomorrow."

Todd then proceded to tell me what was going on: a fourtop of rude diners, who announced on OpenTable that they were "from eGullet," had come into the restaurant, and were having dinner as we spoke. They were apparently determined to have a bad time, because they started disparaging the restaurant almost immediately, saying loudly to the table next to them that there was no way this restaurant was going to live up to the hype, and just LOOK at that piece of birthday cake that went by - all it is ... is a piece of birthday cake. The table near them had already complained to management about their obnoxious behavior, and apparently after they left, a second table complained about them as well.

"I put their red wine on ice by mistake," Todd said, with his head in his hands. 'Nothing we do is good enough for them. We're over there trying to salvage their evening, but it's too late, I can tell.'

I was there, in real time, hearing about this train wreck as it was occurring. When the fourtop was pointed out to me, I did not recognize the diners, and so I did not go up and say hello. And although I cannot say what happened for sure in the bistro that evening, I did indeed see how shaken up Todd was by this, and felt badly for him.

Proud to be a low-maintenance diner,

Rocks.

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You know, Michael Landrum over at Ray's the Steaks has a way of dealing with diners "from" eGullet. He has this special "second-class" service reserved specially for them. :wink::wink::wink:

I seem to recall a thread on "diners from eGullet." Can't seem to locate it right now though.

And Eve's "birthday cake" is the essence of truth in advertising.

edited to add :wink: s

Edited by mnebergall (log)
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"You know, Michael Landrum over at Ray's the Steaks has a way of dealing with diners "from" eGullet. He has this special "second-class" service reserved specially for them."

Do you mean that mentioning you are a eG member gets you second rate treatment at Rays? Is it common for restauranteurs to "roll thier eyes" when one mentions eG?

I'd like to know so I don't start off on the wrong foot.

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"You know, Michael Landrum over at Ray's the Steaks has a way of dealing with diners "from" eGullet. He has this special "second-class" service reserved specially for them."

Do you mean that mentioning you are a eG member gets you second rate treatment at Rays? Is it common for restauranteurs to "roll thier eyes" when one mentions eG?

I'd like to know so I don't start off on the wrong foot.

I think there should have been a :wink: ...

Edited by mdt (log)
Wearing jeans to the best restaurants in town.
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