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Royal Icing: Tips & Techniques


Tepee
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Thanks for the input mkfradin, I didn't know that. And thanks for the recipe Wendy. I had been using Colette Peters recipe, which only takes 2 egg whites to a pound of powd. sugar, but also uses 2 teaspoons of water and 1/2 tsp. cream of tartar. I'll try yours out. BTW, when you say xxxsugar, is that a generic term for powdered sugar? On my cake board, we've gotten into a few discussions about 6X and 10X powdered sugar, so I don't know if xxxsugar is the same or something different.

Patrick and M.Lucia... now you've got me curious and I'm going to try both to see what happens.

Gee, I didn't realize the can of worms I'd get myself into. :biggrin: But I love experimenting and always trying to find something better. Thanks again... there's so much to learn on this board.

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I know somewhere there was a discussion of which was better for royal icing but I can't remember the outcome or if there was a preference one way or the other. I use meringue powder because it's easier and I don't want to take a chance with a customer on egg whites. For home I don't care and we all eat egg products that are not cooked up to temp. As Anne said, "it's only my family!" :laugh::laugh:

Josette

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I know somewhere there was a discussion of which was better for royal icing but I can't remember the outcome or if there was a preference one way or the other.  I use meringue powder because it's easier and I don't want to take a chance with a customer on egg whites.  For home I don't care and we all eat egg products that are not cooked up to temp.  As Anne said, "it's only my family!"  :laugh:  :laugh:

The main differences I've found are that meringue powder royal can be rebeaten once it gets over-relaxed - fresh egg white royal can't. I've never gotten it back to "day 1" strength, but I've revived some batches this way.

But fresh egg white royal is much stronger, especially if it's hand-stirred rather than made on a mixer. I prefer it for large runouts and lace pieces, neither of which is likely to be eaten anyway.

B. Keith Ryder

BCakes by BKeith

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In my area they sell jugs called "Just Whites." They are good quality but because of the pasteurization they don't really whip (which is what most pasteurized egg products say in tiny print on their labels).

And yet I've never had a problem making angel food cake or even meringues with Just Whites (blue box?) bought here in Ontario -- even though the label says the same thing!

I do find it helps to leave them out on the counter for about fifteen or twenty minutes to take the chill off. But they whip perfectly fine and stiff; slightly less volume, perhaps, but not distressingly so.

Edited by CompassRose (log)
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I agree that egg white royal makes stronger runout pieces. That's one thing I like about it. I never thought to beat it by hand though. Ugh! I'm not sure I'd be up to that :biggrin:

After the discussion about the "whipability" I think I'll do some experimenting this weekend and try to see which whites whip the best for me. You've all got me curious.

I got these. The Just whites are powdered, found in the baking aisle. All Whites are liquid, found in the refrigerator section. I couldn't find pasteurized eggs at Kroger, but will check the other two local stores.

gallery_24383_628_4936.jpg

CompassRose - Do you refrigerate your Just Whites?

edited to try to increase picture size... still working on it :blink: OK, think I got it. Don't you just love us newbies? :biggrin:

Edited by JacqueOH (log)
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Unless the manufacturing process has been changed very recently, the All Whites will not whip at all. The Just Whites will whip fine. They do not need to be refrigerated.

EDIT to add that the can says "Store in a dry place/ No refrigeration required"

Edited by Patrick S (log)

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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In my area they sell jugs called "Just Whites." They are good quality but because of the pasteurization they don't really whip (which is what most pasteurized egg products say in tiny print on their labels).

And yet I've never had a problem making angel food cake or even meringues with Just Whites (blue box?) bought here in Ontario -- even though the label says the same thing!

Are there two products called Just Whites, I wonder? My can (made by Del El, same as in Jacque's photo) does not say this, and in fact has a photo of a big meringue covered pie and a recipe for meringue cookies on the tin itself.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...

I desperately need some professional advice here as I am getting very frustrated!

I love to decorate cookies but when I want to frost the cookie with white icing it becomes slightly dingey and mildly yellow-ish after a couple of days. Why is this and what's the trick to keeping the white bright? Is it best to add white coloring? Is it the brand of meringue powder I'm using? What is it? I feel like I've tried everything!

Please help me! Please! I'm take pride in my cookies and want them to look their best.

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I'm not a pro, but, you can add a tiny bit of blue to your white royal icing. That'll 'whiten' the icing.

edit to add: Just make sure the coloring is not oil-based or the icing will not set.

Edited by Tepee (log)

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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I always use fresh (or pasteurized) liquid whites and powdered sugar. I think the key is to whip them for a few minutes on high speed with the whisk attachment on the kitchenaid.

Stephen W.

Pastry Chef/Owner

The Sweet Life Bakery

Vineland, NJ

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I don't know if this is true for everyone, but when I use meringue powder to make my royal, the color stays fixed infinitely (I have good white dummies that are 4 and 5 years old), whereas when I make my royal from real egg whites, it sometimes gets yellow and blotchy relatively quickly. While meringue powder is more expensive, a little goes a long way, and if you're going to invest the time to make something beautiful, it might be worth the extra expense.

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Thanks to everyone for the advice. :biggrin:

I do always use Wilton brand meringue powder it's more convenient for me than storing fresh eggs and I've tried other brands of meringue powder and have generally felt that they are not quite as good.

I will try the lemon juice and see how it works!

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The recipe for Royal Icing at Gayle's Bakery here in town calls for:

1 cup confectioner's sugar

1 t. egg white

1 T. freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 t. corn syrup

1 t. water

Mix the egg white w/the sugar. Whisk -- it will be lumpy/crumbly. Add lemon juice and corn syrup and mix until smooth. It should run off the whisk in a slow and even stream. If not, add a little water. (I don't add it all at once.)

Throw it into your pastry bag (1/4" tip for hot cross buns, e.g.) and you're in business.

I have made this recipe many many times and it comes out perfectly. It's so white it looks like it had its teeth bleached.

Edited by tanabutler (log)
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I used to order the meringue powder from CK Products (Country Kitchen) before I was able to buy it commercially. I preferred it to Wilton b/c you can buy it in larger quantities. I hate tiny jars b/c I always run out halfway through a recipe. The big 1# bag was my fave.

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The recipe for Royal Icing at Gayle's Bakery here in town calls for:

1 cup confectioner's sugar

1 t. egg white

1 T. freshly squeezed lemon juice

1 t. corn syrup

1 t. water

Mix the egg white w/the sugar. Whisk -- it will be lumpy/crumbly. Add lemon juice and corn syrup and mix until smooth. It should run off the whisk in a slow and even stream. If not, add a little water. (I don't add it all at once.)

Throw it into your pastry bag (1/4" tip for hot cross buns, e.g.) and you're in business.

I have made this recipe many many times and it comes out perfectly. It's so white it looks like it had its teeth bleached.

I will give this a try. I've never made a version with corn syrup before. Thanks!

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