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Northwest Vegetable Gardening


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Parsley also does well here.

I too have had lots of problems with dill. Something (cutworms?) eats mine right to the ground as soon as my back is turned, unless I apply all sorts of chemicals. And even if it survives, it never does well and turns brown too quickly.

I plant parsley and basil in close proximity to tomatoes (in the same pots, if you have room). They are plants that seem to do better when near each other.

We also have bay trees and we leave them outdoors all year long (in Portland) without problem. We bought a lime tree and meyer lemon tree this year, but I'm sure we'll need to bring them inside during the winter.

I've also tried lemongrass, and that does well in the summer. But it too needs to be brought inside during the winter.

Check out our Fooddoings and more at A View from Eastmoreland
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Parsley also does well here.

I too have had lots of problems with dill.  Something (cutworms?) eats mine right to the ground as soon as my back is turned, unless I apply all sorts of chemicals.  And even if it survives, it never does well and turns brown too quickly.

I plant parsley and basil in close proximity to tomatoes (in the same pots, if you have room).  They are plants that seem to do better when near each other.

We also have bay trees and we leave them outdoors all year long (in Portland) without problem.  We bought a lime tree and meyer lemon tree this year, but I'm sure we'll need to bring them inside during the winter.

I've also tried lemongrass, and that does well in the summer.  But it too needs to be brought inside during the winter.

Lemongrass?! Oh boy, that would go wonderful with the Thai and Persian basils that I sowed. Did you grow the lemongrass and bay from seed? If not, where do you get your plants? I've found some unusual plants for sale at Food Front in N.W. Portland but Joy Creek, my main nursery supplier, doesn't have anything like that.

Also, I would love to try my hand at a Kaffir lime tree but I have no room for it indoors (waaaay too many houseplants). Is this a plant that could overwinter in a warmish garage? Hmmm..perhaps the houseplant facing my sunny deck needs to find another home.

Is it obvious that I would love to have a few basics for future Thai cooking?!

:rolleyes:

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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This is my first stab at gardening. I have some sugar snap peas growing in the yard now (need to do some more work on the bamboo and twine trellis I built for them) and a bunch of tomatoes potted out on the deck. I do worry that it's a tad cold yet for the tomatoes but we'll see. Need to get cages for them rolling this weekend. The tomatoes are one each of green zebra, juliet, dona, orange sunburst, yellow pear and sweet million.

Bacon starts its life inside a piglet-shaped cocoon, in which it receives all the nutrients it needs to grow healthy and tasty.

-baconwhores.com

Bacon, the Food of Joy....

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I have greens in containers-lettuces, spinach and arugula-that are almost ready to start eating.

Y'all are making me a bit jealous. I had plans to build a huge raised bed for vegetables next to the house this spring, but the kitchen remodelers told me that unless I WANTED asbestos and lead paint bits in my soil, to hold off until they're done in late summer. And I don't want to put too much more in containers, since I'm going to be in Hawaii (boo hoo, I know) for work for at least a month this summer and I don't want to burden the mr. with too much garden work.

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Great ideas! Since I use quite a bit of oregano and bay I think I'll try my hand at growing my own. Now to find room!  :hmmm:

I forgot that I have winter savory and a few mints- lemon, chocolate and apple.

The winter savory is one powerful-strong herb and I've heard that summer savory is a bit milder. Has anyone found this to be true?

Ooooooh, we have to talk! My herb garden is brand new and pitiful and I covet your rare thymes, lavender, and lemon mint. Time for a trip across the river with baked goodies with which to bribe you. :biggrin:

Bay is worth the small footprint; If I could only have one fresh herb, it'd be bay. It's totally unlike the dry dusty stuff in jars and amazingly versatile. I infuse all sorts of stuff with bay; butter and milk for mashed potatoes is a big favorite, oil that gets used in bread is good too, and bay-infused creme brulee is sublimely delicate.

You can grow it in a pot or the ground and plant a groundcover you like at its feet. Got creeping thyme? I have sweet woodruff around mine (which just went in the ground a couple of weeks ago). There's a picture of it here FYI, this tree is about six years old, thrived at my old house in north Snohomish county and, although a bit bare at the moment, seems to be doing fine in the cooler, wetter Columbia River fog valley.

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Lemongrass?! Oh boy, that would go wonderful with the Thai and Persian basils that I sowed. Did you grow the lemongrass and bay from seed? If not, where do you get your plants?

Sorry for my late response on this. No, we didn't grow the lemongrass or bay from seed. Although Portland Nursery often has lemongrass, I got mine from a vendor at the Portland Farmer's Market. His was cheaper and looked a lot bigger and healthier than what they had at the Nursery (that was last year, so YMMV).

My wife got the bay trees from a nursery in Scholls. For the life of me I can't remember where. But they should be easy to come by.

Check out our Fooddoings and more at A View from Eastmoreland
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  • 3 weeks later...

My wife and I have found that lemon verbena is very easy to grow around here. We're growing it in a mid-size pot on our condo deck. It goes dormant in the winter and starts back up in early spring.

It's a wonderful plant just for the lemon-drop smell and makes an excellent, excellent sorbet.

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On Tuesday, I got home from work and discovered that the edges of all of the leaves on my lemon verbena had turned black!

I have it planted just as you do, in a terra cotta pot on my patio. It did rain really hard a few times that day, so I was wondering -- are the leaves of this plant too delicate to get pounded by a good Seattle downpour?

Or perhaps it was something else...?

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I am hoping to move to a new home soon, so have not planted anything this year. That means my whole small garden is sprouted from last years' plants.

I have a rosemary (did poorly in a pot, then when I moved it into the garden it took off and is now quite gorgeous), several Italian parsleys that have self sown, mint and a few oreganos (which are both in the mint family and will take over the planet if left to their own devices), and two kinds of strawberries.

My strawberries rock--at least the ones that the bugs are willing to share with us.

Also, Abra gace me a mail order source for lemongrass, which I want to try once we settle into a new place: Richter's Herbs

Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther
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I have <snip> several Italian parsleys that have self sown,

We have these too, I call them "free-range" parsley :laugh: I had all my herbs except the rosemary & lavendar in pots so they would be up where I could reach them more easily to care for them & to harvest, but the parsley made a mad leap for freedom & is now thriving right next to the pot where the parent plant is barely alive... Yet another thing poor Bill has to mow around...

We also got a free range strawberry plant this year out of no-where - I'm not arguing, I just hope it fruits!

Has anyone here had success growing salsify? (aka oyster root) I adore salsify & you just can't get it in the markets...

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

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I have <snip> several Italian parsleys that have self sown,

We have these too, I call them "free-range" parsley :laugh: I had all my herbs except the rosemary & lavendar in pots so they would be up where I could reach them more easily to care for them & to harvest, but the parsley made a mad leap for freedom & is now thriving right next to the pot where the parent plant is barely alive... Yet another thing poor Bill has to mow around...

That reminds me of my 8 yr old niece who was visiting someone else's garden.....she kept asking if she could go "hunting for salad" :raz:

Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther
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How are folks' tomatoes doing?

My one, wee Sweet Million is doing very well. :smile: It already has a few flower buds!

I under-planted some of my deck roses with Thai basils and they have sprouted.

Man, I hope that Vietnamese spring rolls are in my near future.

My various rosemary's have stopped blooming. Most of my thymes are still blooming. Garlic and onion chives are growing like crazy but are done blooming. Y'know, I rarely use the blooms in my meals. Are the flowers more of a decoration rather than a flavor component? They taste pretty good and ARE attractive, but I'm not cooking for a gent that appreciates flowers in his food. Poor dear. :wink:

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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How are folks' tomatoes doing?

My one, wee Sweet Million is doing very well.  :smile:  It already has a few flower buds!

I planted three cherry tomato plants that I bought at the Seattle Tilth sale and all three are blooming and one has two tomatoes. I'm very excited!

Practice Random Acts of Toasting

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How are folks' tomatoes doing?

My one, wee Sweet Million is doing very well.  :smile:  It already has a few flower buds!

I planted three cherry tomato plants that I bought at the Seattle Tilth sale and all three are blooming and one has two tomatoes. I'm very excited!

Can anyone suggest a good source for tomato plants in the Seattle area? I'm getting a late start--and missed the tilth sale-- but want to grow some cherry tomatoes in pots.

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How are folks' tomatoes doing?

My one, wee Sweet Million is doing very well.  :smile:  It already has a few flower buds!

I planted three cherry tomato plants that I bought at the Seattle Tilth sale and all three are blooming and one has two tomatoes. I'm very excited!

Can anyone suggest a good source for tomato plants in the Seattle area? I'm getting a late start--and missed the tilth sale-- but want to grow some cherry tomatoes in pots.

PCC carries the same plants (from Rent's Due). Also, some at True Value on Greenwood that looked stronger a few weeks ago. All limited supply.

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All of tomatoes are doing well and blooming, with the exception of the German Johnson, which has got a funny problem with its leaves curling up. In fact, the whole plant is kind of curling up, sort of like a fist. Weird.

I'm also having a massive struggle with the snails and/or cutworms over the green beans. I plant, the beans break through the soil, and the critters eat. I've resorted to powder, slug pellets, and even nematodes, but I'm barely staying ahead after my second replanting.

On the bright side, the spinach is marvelous, and the rainbow chard is ready to eat.

Check out our Fooddoings and more at A View from Eastmoreland
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How are folks' tomatoes doing?

My one, wee Sweet Million is doing very well.  :smile:  It already has a few flower buds!

I planted three cherry tomato plants that I bought at the Seattle Tilth sale and all three are blooming and one has two tomatoes. I'm very excited!

Can anyone suggest a good source for tomato plants in the Seattle area? I'm getting a late start--and missed the tilth sale-- but want to grow some cherry tomatoes in pots.

Beautiful organic tomato plants at Pike Place Market - Wednesday, organic farmers day - in the street stall. $3.00 and very big. Included some cherry types. Run.

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I've been lazy about planting my tomatoes. I have a few in containers, and a few that are goign to go in the ppatch are still in the 4 inch plastic pots. amazingly some of them already have litle green tomatoes on them.

The greens and peas I planted this spring aren't doing so well.. maybe because of the shade from the overwintered lacinato kale, 7 ft tall chard, and cauliflowers..

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How are folks' tomatoes doing?

My one, wee Sweet Million is doing very well.  :smile:  It already has a few flower buds!

I planted three cherry tomato plants that I bought at the Seattle Tilth sale and all three are blooming and one has two tomatoes. I'm very excited!

Can anyone suggest a good source for tomato plants in the Seattle area? I'm getting a late start--and missed the tilth sale-- but want to grow some cherry tomatoes in pots.

Beautiful organic tomato plants at Pike Place Market - Wednesday, organic farmers day - in the street stall. $3.00 and very big. Included some cherry types. Run.

Thank you!!!

I found them (Rent's Due Ranch) at the Lake City Farmers Market this afternoon. Exactly what I was looking for.

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  • 1 month later...

I moved into my new home about 3 weeks ago. I know that it is not even time yet to think about gardening for next year, but I missed all this year, and I can't help myself. Plus it beats unpacking all to heck.

The previous owner planted a lot of native plants, which is right on all the way. She especially liked ones that attract hummingbirds :). Most plantings are woodsy garden and rock garden types, with some beautiful choices.

One thing that I love about the place is that it is in the woods, and it is also sunny and bright. Best of both worlds. There are chives, sage, and thyme in pots, but all of them look pretty haggard either from age or heat. There is a rosemary in the garden that is different than the ones I've had before. It is a bright green color and has a weeping droopy way of growing. Hope it survives the winter. Best of all, when I was weeding yesterday, I found BLUEBERRIES!!!!!!!

I am planning to dig some strawberry plantlets from my previous garden and bring them over (not that anyone would be able to tell anything was missing from the strawberry jungle over there). Other than that, I will find out if deer and squirrels eat tomatoes. I've not gardened around deer before and could never learn to sympathize with those who complain about those graceful pretty beasts sharing our space.

I dream of growing and sniffing lemongrass and a kaffir lime (indoors? it is sunny inside too so it should work). What about onions and garlic? Or a kiwi?

Anyone who has thoughts on gardening in a woodsy area, I'd love your advice.....BTW, garden-wise, I am in the inexperienced dreamer category.

Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther
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Tam, it's not too late for this year. Very soon, as soon as it cools off a bit, you can plant spinach and salad greens for a Fall harvest. They won't germinate if it's too hot, but will grow well into the Fall.

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Tam, it's not too late for this year.  Very soon, as soon as it cools off a bit, you can plant spinach and salad greens for a Fall harvest.  They won't germinate if it's too hot, but will grow well into the Fall.

I love spinach!!! What a good idea. BTW, would you like any strawberry plants?

Edited to add, strawberry offer is open to anyone, but Abra lives closer than most of y'all. I am in Bremerton.

Edited by tamiam (log)
Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther
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Sure, I'll take a couple of strawberries if you have extra.  I have one little Alpine strawberry in a small pot, and get maybe two dozen tiny but delicious berries every summer from it.

I have two kinds, one is called a June-bearing and the other everbearing that came from that nursery on Bond Road, selected for happiness in the local climate. Both make gorgeous medium-sized sweet berries by the handful, This made us very popular with all the little kids in the 'hood.

I have them in a raised bed fortified with lots of compost, and pretty much don't take care of them at all. They send runners that root very shallow, so they seem to be endlessly share-able. My initial 12 plants turned into many more between their 1st and 2nd season, (not bad like mint or oregano, just prolific).

The only thing I dont know, and one of you real gardeners might be able to advise, is do you have to wait for the berry season to end before transplanting (my gut says yes)??? If so, the everbearing is still going, but much slowed down. The June's ran from May - July, and are done now.

In any case, it is probably best to take them before the house sells, as in soon, cuz I have an agreement with the great and good powers of the universe that the house will sell really fast once we put it on the market next week.

In other words, PM me, and we can make a plan.

Oil and potatoes both grow underground so french fries may have eventually invented themselves had they not been invented -- J. Esther
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  • 8 months later...
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