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Smoking a Beef Loin


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for the smoker....get some decent wood...I like apple, crab apple, fig, and cherry...maybe chestnut...depends on the meat...

make the wood into chips if it is not already.

soak in water for a couple of minutes (not too long)

build a small fire of charcoal in the side box....

make a small "boat" out of tin foil that will hold your wood chips...basically you want it to serve as a base to hold it in and also to have a hinged lid that traps ash and soot.

after the charcoal has reached its hottest, knock the coals over, and rest your boat of wet wood chips on top....seal and wait...

Edited by Bicycle Lee (log)

"Make me some mignardises, &*%$@!" -Mateo

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Bump!

Marlene and I are going to be smoking prime rib roasts on Saturday. She'll do an 8 pounder, me a 5 pounder (both boneless).

This was really prompted because I got an unbelievable deal on the one I purchased, and it's been a few weeks since I smoked anything.

Any other bits of advice?

And, any suggestions for sides?

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Yesterday my husband picked up a bunch of different types of wood chunks at a terrific little BBQ place up near his office (of course he spied a Big Green Egg there and now wants one of those, but that's a different story). :biggrin: We've now got apple, hickory, pecan and mesquite. Which wood should we use for the prime rib?

And this time we've got Kingsford briquettes instead of lump charcoal.

Susan for sides, I'm thinking roasted potatoes and yorkies and maybe a salad. Should I do a port wine reduction for the meat?

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Marlene, I'm using hickory (because that's what I have).

Sides? I'm thinking potato salad (to make Heidi happy) and something green.

Yes, to port wine reduction. I'm thinking regular gravy (to keep Peter happy), but maybe I don't need any sauce if we're having potato salad. ????

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I could make gravy except I really hate making it without drippings. It just doesn't seem to be the same. But then again, what are potatoes without gravy?

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Question. Since mine is 8 lbs. should I assume an extra hour over Susans? I'm using a Weber Bullet.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Another idea I've heard a couple of NY restaurants are doing is to cold smoke entire primals and then cut off steaks to grill at your leisure. You could even smoke the loin, portion it, freeze it and have smoked steaks ready to go all month.

PS: I am a guy.

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I could make gravy except I really hate making it without drippings.  It just doesn't seem to be the same.  But then again, what are potatoes without gravy?

In the Weber bullet you can catch drippings. You need a a sheet of foil from ont of the long rools of heavy duty foil Suspend it over the top of the water pan. The drippings will collect in the foil. I do this with my turkeys to get drippings for gravy. And you should expect an hour more than Susan. Your internal temp is the key, not the time. Very important not to over cook this meat. You and Susan have smoking fun!

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Since this topic has been brought back to live again from 2004 I wanted to offer a update about preparing whole "Beef Striploins" that I have been doing regularly during the previous year providing delicious rare Beef Sandwiches on a steady basis for lunch and snacks.

I purchase who "Cryovac Strip Loins" from ungraded range Beef at a Asian Market being assure it was kept several weeks in their cooler for aging.

These Strips weigh from about 9 pounds to about 12 pounds. I request the larger pieces since I am going to Roast.

I am preparing this meat to slice thin for sandwiches containing almost no fat by preference, but excellent protein values.

When removing the Strip from the Cryovac bag the fluids accumulated are called serum and are generated by the enzymes in the beef during the aging period naturally.

I begin by first washing off the whole piece in cold water, drying with a clean kitchen towel before removing all the fat from the Strip.

There is a small amount of fat and trim remaining on the bottom of the loin thats easily removed. I then begin to remove all the fat and sinew from the top of the loin with a very sharp fillet knife working from the thicker top into the center and from the thinner bottom where there is more sinew meeting both at the center bring the whole fat cap off in one piece if possible. If your not a experienced working with a knife just keep working slowly trying not to cut into the meat as best you can.

Save all your fat and trimmings to cook together to extract all the flavors for your Au jus.

After trimming you Strip you will remain with about 85% of your original weight. This is because your Strip was grass fed and ungraded. If this Strip was a grain fed Choice Beef #2 yield it would have a 75% yield due to the extra fat content. The marbling of the Choice Beef would also taste better and be more tender then ungraded.

Consider the price differences: Ungraded Grass Fed Strip Loin 10 pounds at $3.29 = $32.90 = trimmed piece weight 8.50 pounds = $3.87 per pound.

Choice Strip Loin 10 pounds at $5.99 per pound = $59.90 = trimmed piece weight 7.50 pounds = $7.99 per pound

That's slightly over double the price, however the result is more important. The leaner Strip when finished has more flavor and character with more Beef taste then the Choice grain fed Strip. It's also leaner and more healthy due to the lower fat content in grass fed beef. Both cuts are tender if sliced thinly and taste better then almost any commercial Roast Beef sold retail. Under 25 cents per ounce for a delicious ounce of very high protein is terrific value that not only tastes great but is economical.

In Seattle where I have never been able to buy a rare Roast Beef Sandwich anyplace retail, it something worth while to brown bag for lunch.

Recipe:

I having only 2 family members at home cut the whole Strip into 3 equal pieces, double wrapping them in plastic wrap and putting two pieces into my freezer, removing them, placing into the refrigerator to thaw a day before preperation. The same method of roasting is applicable to one whole Strip or any parts prepared.

Seasoning the Roast: I never use any salt as it bring the juices to the surface while I prefer they remain evenly thru out my roasts.

I simply cover the extrior with ground or cracked black pepper, sometimes if I'm in the mood I will add garlic slivers put into the meat with small punctures to perk it up, it's a matter of taste. I rarely put some MSG to the exterior on those times I want to enhance the Au jus as it's is more effective then using salt with much less required with lower sodium content.

I use a rectangular "Pyrex Roaster" with a Metal Grid placed over the top to elevate the Roast allowing air to circulate around during cooking. I cover the bottom with about 1/2 inch of water to keep the roast moist and catch all the drippings.

I put the Meat into a cold oven setting the temperature at 225 degrees, turning the roast about every 45/60 minutes checking the internal temperature with a probe until the internal temperature shows 135 degrees ( medium rare my choice) if you prefer very rare it can be removed as low as 125 degrees or medium at 145 degrees. Allow the Roast to set again elevated over a large plate or bowl to catch any juices.

Since this Strip was cooked at a low temperture the roast during setting will not raise the internal temperature more then a few degrees. Roasts cooked at higher temperature often will increase about 10 degrees while at rest.

If you have simmered the trimmings at a low temperature during the roasting I will drain all the fluids and solids from the Pyrex Roaster into the simmering pot and allow it to cook another 30/45 minutes then allow to cool on a container, then place into the refrigerator until the fats have solidified to the top and lift the off and disguard.

I use several spoons of this Au jus placed into a flat plate warmed in the microwave to cover the bottom of the plate. Then I thinly slice the Strip, placing the slices on to the flat plate over the juices until I have enough for a sandwich. I then return the sliced meat into the microwave for a few seconds to only moderatedly warn the meat slightly.

It absorbs most of the jus and when layered into a sandwich has a fesh taste. It goes well with Horseradish or your favorite mustard or if your really fortunate a Kimmewick, Salted Roll for homemade Beef on a Wreck.

This same method even works better if done in a Smoker where you can bring the temperture low enough as the cooler smoked exterior on the meat is delicious.

Irwin

I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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Bump!

Marlene and I are going to be smoking prime rib roasts on Saturday.  She'll do an 8 pounder, me a 5 pounder (both boneless).

This was really prompted because I got an unbelievable deal on the one I purchased, and it's been a few weeks since I smoked anything.

Any other bits of advice?

And, any suggestions for sides?

Mostly what Weza said. I like to smoke at 225F to get a more even doneness. You can cook at a higher temperature to shorten cooking time, perhaps up to 350F. Letting the roast rest at room temperature for an hour before cooking will also shorten cooking time, but at the cost of smoke absorption. I'd avoid mesquite, I find the flavor overpowering and repulsive. Pecan, apple, cherry and oak are my favorite woods. Hickory is related to pecan, but a bit harsher. You absolutely need a temperature probe. Check its calibration in ice water and boiling water before using it. If you are using an offset, it is important to rotate the roast. I pull my roasts at 120F and let settle for 20 minutes or so, tented with foil.

Yorkshire pudding would make a good and traditional side. Beef dripping collected in a smoker have a smokey flavor, you may want to render some beef suet. Some kind of potatoes if you don't do the pudding. Brussels sprouts with hollandaise sauce perhaps.

Jim

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I'm planning on smoking at 200-225. If it's really cold or windy, I'll have trouble keeping the temp up, but there's nothing I can do about the weather.

BTW, Marlene will be smoking on a Bullet and I'll be using my trusty Weber Kettle, and I do know how to manage the temp on the Kettle (they don't call me Kettle Queen for nothing). I've settled on potato and green salads as sides, and figure this meat won't need any gravy or sauce.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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I picked up baby new potatoes to roast and some salad fixins. I think I'll try to keep the temp about the same as you Susan. But because I really feel beef needs a gravy or so mething, I think I'll at least make a port wine reduction!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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It's going to be a lovely day for smoking here I think. Clear and sunny, barely any wind and the temp is at least supposed to be above zero.

So I'm figuring probably about 3 hours for my 8 lb roast, maintaining a temp of about 225. I've got the new remote smoker thermometer that Jackal10 recommended to try out too. I think we'll try the apple wood and see how that works. I'll try to catch drippings in a foil tray and I've got rendered beef fat I can use to make Yorkies with and roast the potatoes in. Oh and brussel sprouts don't get anywhere near this house. :biggrin: So the planned menu is:

Roast beef

Roasted baby potatoes

salad

yorkshire pudding

creme caramel

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I'm having trouble with the concept of bacon and prime rib, much as I love both of them. I think you'll be fine since you're smoking at a low temp and I suppose you could mop if you need to.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Chimney just started. I'm running late. Diana and I lingered too long over the cookbooks at the library. I am, howver, the very first person in my library system to check out Charcuterie.

I bailed on potato salad because it just seemed like too much work what with laundry, drywalling, etc. So, it will be mashed here, as well.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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We got started late as well, but ours has been on for about half an hour. Struggling with the temp a bit though. All three vents are closed and I can't get it any lower than 238. I'm trying to keep it at 225.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I think I've really and truely mastered smoking on the kettle. I now struggle to keep the temp above 200. I'm thinking I could probably cold smoke on the darned thing.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Don't worry about minor temperature variations. You regulate the temperature with the bottom vents on the bullet. The critical thing is to monitor the temperatue in the meat.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I just didn't have this experience last time. All three bottom vents are fully closed and the temp has not moved off 238 for the last hour and half.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Well, I would call 238 close enough for gov'mnt work.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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The deed is done.

gallery_6263_35_39316.jpg

The 5 pound roast, which proved to have bones, although was labeled as boneless, was much more juicy and succulent than the photo indicated.

I had a nice smoke ring, and the smokey, slighty crunchy and smokey crust and ring played nicely with the interior, which was almost creamy.

I took the roast off at just under 120 (using my trusty analog Taylor which was a wedding present some almost 25 years ago) and rested while I cooked some potatoes which were smashed with braised in olive oil garlic, butter and milk. The salad was little greens with a balsamic vinagarette.

A most worthy meal. Smokey and bloddy and juicy and tangy, what with all of the tastes combined. And, I smell like smoke. :wub::wub:

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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A most worthy way to cook prime rib.

Starting with the monster roast:

gallery_6080_2623_38085.jpg

Off the smoker at 127. Not quite as crunchy as I'd like on the outside, but worthy nonetheless:

gallery_6080_2623_18655.jpg

Sliced. It's hard to tell but this was beautifully rare. (I'm not letting my husband take food pictures anymore)

gallery_6080_2623_3755.jpg

Served with Roasted potatoes, yorkies, salad (no pic) and creme caramel for dessert

gallery_6080_2623_14834.jpg

gallery_6080_2623_10376.jpg

gallery_6080_2623_5024.jpg

I will say I thought the applewood was a bit overpowering in flavour. Next time I'd go hickory or even mesquite for beef. But this was tender, juicy and rare right to the edges. It was awesome. We've sliced some of the leftovers nice and thin for sandwiches. But we still had a ton left over, so I took the half roast that was left and froze it. I don't suppose anyone knows if cooked prime rib freezes well?

Anyone want some leftovers?

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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