• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Ed Hamilton

White Rums

84 posts in this topic

I recently read somewhere that if you're drinking white rum you might as well drink Bacardi since they're all the same.

There are huge differences in white rums made from molasses. All molasses-bases rums are distilled to a high proof but then some are aged and some aren't.

Flor de Cana white is a good example of an aged white rum but if you like that one, you owe it to yourself to try Brugal white, and Barcelo Gran Blanco, another of my favorite white rums and both of these are made in the Dominican Republic.

For me, Matusalem is a neutral spirit and in fact, they're advertising to vodka drinkers as a premium rum.

As much as I like Cruzan, I don't go out of my way to drink their white rum.

The rums from Puerto Rico are required to be aged at least a year but they tend to be lighter than those from Central America and the Dominican Republic.

When I'm in Puerto Rico I drink Don Q white and coconut water with ice. Now that's a drink!


Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I was the dumbass that said that. :laugh: But I think that adage primarily goes for the industrially made white rum products, not the stuff from smaller producers. And if you are using it in a sissy drink like a daquiri you won't taste the nuances between producers either. To me, Bacardi White, Captain Morgan White, Don Q and and number of other mass marketed white rums taste the same. Obviously you are going to get a lot of variation if you are using locally made molasses, or if you are using different grades. For example the white rum from New Orleans Rum, which uses blackstrap molasses, tastes totally different from Bacardi or from most commercial rums I have had.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Molasses makes a difference, but the some of the small distillers age their white rums longer and then carbon filter it to remove the color gained while the rum was in the barrel. Water also makes a big difference, some distillers go to great lengths to purify, recify and reduce their local water to simple H2O, other distillers are blessed with a bountiful supply of tasty natural water that simply tastes better.

Other factors that make a difference are the proof of the spirit in the aging barrel, type of filtering used to remove the color, and of course the quality of the product being aged. Some white rums aren't far from vodka. Once you've tasted good white rum, you'll be spoiled.


Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting, I basically avoid buying white rums (unless its Rhum Agricole, and thats a whole different ballgame) unless I have the ability to sample them first. I was able to taste the N.O. rum, which is why I bought it. I still prefer the aged stuff.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree that Flor De Caña ® Rums - Slow-aged for an incredibly smooth taste. www.flordecana.com compare with Brugal. :raz:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just bought Ron Matusalem Platino and am loving it. It was between that and Flor de Cana. Any of the insightful posters wanna let me know if I made a boo boo or not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be surprised if you didn't like Platino, that is, if you like white rum. Matusalem is owned in part by Skyy spirits, who brought you Skyy vodka and they are marketing this rum to premium vodka drinkers. Platino is a very dry light rum with a citrus and floral body with coconut oil on the finish.


Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Interesting, I basically avoid buying white rums (unless its Rhum Agricole, and thats a whole different ballgame)

Do you know where in NYC I can get Rhum Agricole? And what makers are available and which ones of them are the best?


You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Interesting, I basically avoid buying white rums (unless its Rhum Agricole, and thats a whole different ballgame)

Do you know where in NYC I can get Rhum Agricole? And what makers are available and which ones of them are the best?

Its virtually impossible at this juncture. Rhum St. James is the only one I have been able to find in NYC, and it really doesn't taste like Rhum Agricole because its distillation process is unique.

There will be some french Rhums avaliable toward the end of the year, but not until then.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How come? Political reasons?


You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How come?  Political reasons?

The companies are extremely small and produce a very small amount of product -- most of it is consumed in the Caribbean. Additionally the bottles and the labels also do not conform to US bottling and labeling standards and thus new packaging had to be designed -- for example the 500ml and 700ml bottles are not approved for use in the US. The approval process is currently underway for several brands of Rhum Agricole (white and rhum vieux) from Martinique that will be avaliable in the states in late '04 and early '05 -- most of these will come in bartender-size 1 Liter (1000ml) bottles which are used in Europe as well as the US, so that the distilleries do not need to retool.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. I'll be in Jamaica in a couple of months. Maybe I can find it there. Out of curiosity, can you describe what is special about it? I got some Barbancourt's 9 year. Not bad but I imagine also not terribly enlightening about the white variety of rhum agricole.


You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks.  I'll be in Jamaica in a couple of  months.  Maybe I can find it there.  Out of curiosity, can you describe what is special about it?  I got some Barbancourt's 9 year.  Not bad but I imagine also not terribly enlightening about the white variety of rhum agricole.

Rhum Agricole is made from pressed cane juice. This differs from basically all other rums which are made from molasses, which is a by product of sugar refining.

Barbancourt, which is from Haiti and not Martinique, is not a Rhum Agricole because it doesn't have the flavor profile of a Rhum Agricole -- its heavily processed and refined to the point where those characteristics are no longer in the rum. Rhum Agricole has a "primitive", unprocessed flavor to it that is very hard to describe, but once you've tasted a Rhum Agricole, you know exactly what that is. Its a cane juice flavor.

I don't think you are going to be able to find it in Jamaica. Rhum Agricole is pretty specific to the Antilles and East Indies.

When on Jamaica definitely look for Appleton 21, if you can get it for 50 bucks a bottle or less you are in good shape. Bring home some Sangster's Rum Cream as well, its very nice.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess I'm feeling around in the dark here. Saw rum spelled funny while at Union Square wines etc and jumped on it. Neglected to notice the absence of agricole following rhum. Ah well. Sure to find a use for it.

I'm going to stay optimistic about Jamaica. There's a pretty active inter-island trade down there. Always surprised about the breadth of what's available.

BTW, Have you ever tasted Wray and Nephew's Berry Hill pimento liqueur?


You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a shame that the Matusalem Platino is like a vodka...

Interestingly enough, I found out about the Skyy connection when trying to find Gran Reserva; they referred me to the local vodka rep!

It seems that a rum named after a Cuban brand should taste a little more Cuban! I love the Cuban aged white ron; I can't get enough of the pungent taste...it makes mixed drinks come alive!

Bruce

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bring home some Sangster's Rum Cream as well

I'll second that recommendation. In fact, that is the most requested Jamaican rum product at my website.

Have you ever tasted Wray and Nephew's Berry Hill pimento liqueur

This is also something to look for as it isn't imported to the US.

And forget finding rhum agricole in Jamaica, they make enough rum of their own.

In the French West Indies, you can't even find Martinique rhum in Guadeloupe and vice a versa.

Saw rum spelled funny while at Union Square wines etc and jumped on it. Neglected to notice the absence of agricole following rhum. Ah well. Sure to find a use for it.

Where is Union Square? As for what to do with white rhum agricole, search this forum for ti punch and you'll have the traditional French West Indies drink.


Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Saw rum spelled funny while at Union Square wines etc and jumped on it. Neglected to notice the absence of agricole following rhum. Ah well. Sure to find a use for it.

Where is Union Square? As for what to do with white rhum agricole, search this forum for ti punch and you'll have the traditional French West Indies drink.

Union Square is in NYC, man. Are you having me on?

I'd love to find a use for this elusive rum spelled funny in the farm business but I can't need to find a use until I can get my hands on a bottle.


You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Union Square is in NYC, man. Are you having me on?

No offense Ned, but I've spent the better part of the last twenty years on my sailboat in the islands, so NYC isn't the center of my universe. As for this funny spelled rhum you found can you give us a hint as to the label name? Is it dark or white? I assume it isn't Barbancourt, but I don't want to make an 'ass' of 'u' and 'me.'

Bear with us, there is a use for that rhum, but please don't mix it with Coke, that's coca-cola.


Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No offense taken and sorry if any was offered. That sounds like a great life to the likes of me. Who cares where Union Square is then. It was Barabncourt's 8 year as it turns out. I have drunk it naked in a glass so far and intend to add ice next time and from there we'll see how to proceed, not far I imagine.

20 yrs on a sailboat. Man what a life. I've spent some time in the waters in and around the north and south eastern coast of Jamaica hunting for fish under the power of diesel engines. Water temp 84 degrees. No small thing when it's February in NYC. Could think of a thousand questions for you.


You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahh Barbancourt 5 star. aka Reserve Speciale, Special Reserve. To me that is the best of the Barbancourt line. Lots of butterscotch on the palate and a lingering smoky coconut, fruit and vanilla finish.

I sip that one with a little ice or cool water. Sometimes I even add a little Cruzan Estate Diamond, stir and see how the flavors change with time. I have a small bottle of this blend on board and it consistently ranks high among fellow rum lovers. If this sounds crazy, so be it. Try it, but be warned that you might like it.

The Estate Diamond is a drier rum than the Barbancourt and they complement each other well.

Barbancourt is made from sugar cane juice and/or sugar cane syrup, depending on availability, distilled in a single-column still and then redistilled in a pot still, aged in large vats and then bottled in Haiti. At 8 years old, 5 star is smoother than 3 star (4 years old) and most of the people I know enjoy it more than the 15 year old Reserve du Domaine, the one in the fancy box.

When I do presentations, I like to introduce drinkers to the 3 star, then move to the 5 star and let them experience what aging does for a rum. But the 15 year old is a different blend and most people prefer the younger 8 year old blend. And at half the price of the older product, 5 star is a great value.

So try this one with a little water and see how the flavor opens up, but too water will kill it very quickly. I also mix this rum with a drop of ginger syrup and ice for some variety from time to time.


Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And if you are using it in a sissy drink like a daquiri you won't taste the nuances between producers either.

You calling Hemingway a sissy?

I like a good daiquiri (not the blended strawberry slop served at most restaurants - just rum, lime, and syrup shaken and served in a cocktail glass), "Bacardi" cocktail (rum/lemon/syrup/grenadine), and other rum based drinks ... but, I think most of them are a little "sissy."

I guess a cuba libre or a dark and stormy are a bit more burly. But what are the macho white rum drinks?

rien

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And if you are using it in a sissy drink like a daquiri you won't taste the nuances between producers either.

You calling Hemingway a sissy?

I like a good daiquiri (not the blended strawberry slop served at most restaurants - just rum, lime, and syrup shaken and served in a cocktail glass), "Bacardi" cocktail (rum/lemon/syrup/grenadine), and other rum based drinks ... but, I think most of them are a little "sissy."

I guess a cuba libre or a dark and stormy are a bit more burly. But what are the macho white rum drinks?

rien

Mojitos, since they are mostly rum.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ahh Barbancourt 5 star. aka Reserve Speciale, Special Reserve. To me that is the best of the Barbancourt line. Lots of butterscotch on the palate and a lingering smoky coconut, fruit and vanilla finish.

I sip that one with a little ice or cool water. Sometimes I even add a little Cruzan Estate Diamond, stir and see how the flavors change with time. I have a small bottle of this blend on board and it consistently ranks high among fellow rum lovers. If this sounds crazy, so be it. Try it, but be warned that you might like it.

The Estate Diamond is a drier rum than the Barbancourt and they complement each other well.

Barbancourt is made from sugar cane juice and/or sugar cane syrup, depending on availability, distilled in a single-column still and then redistilled in a pot still, aged in large vats and then bottled in Haiti. At 8 years old, 5 star is smoother than 3 star (4 years old) and most of the people I know enjoy it more than the 15 year old Reserve du Domaine, the one in the fancy box.

When I do presentations, I like to introduce drinkers to the 3 star, then move to the 5 star and let them experience what aging does for a rum. But the 15 year old is a different blend and most people prefer the younger 8 year old blend. And at half the price of the older product, 5 star is a great value.

So try this one with a little water and see how the flavor opens up, but too water will kill it very quickly. I also mix this rum with a drop of ginger syrup and ice for some variety from time to time.

Had an acquaintance over who eschews drinking booze unadulterated btu the Barbancourt's was on the counter and I was committed to getting some in me. I washed some ice in highball glasses and poured off the excess water. Added a tablespoon of rose's lime then a shot and a half of barbancourt's, gave a stir. Then a squeeze of lime on top, not mixed in. Delicious. I normally make this with Appleton's.. Kind of like the Barbancourt version better.


You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey guys, I'm new here.

Just wondering what you thought of Mount Gay Special Reserve light rum. I think Bacardi light rum is highly overrated, comparable to the way Cuervo Especial is considered good tequila.

Anyway, I've tried the Mount Gay Eclipse and think its a decent rum for the price. Not what I would consider a sipping rum, and I prefer spiced rums better (Captain Private Stock) when drinking rum and coke, so I rarely buy the Eclipse. A couple people have said the Special Reserve is good stuff, but I haven't got around to trying it.

Anyone here try it, and if so what did you think?

Oh, BTW, I would recommend everyone avoid the Mount Gay Vanilla. I was highly disappointed in that. Smelled and tasted more like marshmellow than vanilla.


Edited by alphaiii (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ron Havana Club Añejo Blanco worked great for Mojitos last week. :raz::wub: Came in a 1.14 Liter bottle, it's apparently aged 2 years, & is a bit lighter yellow coloured than the Ron Havana Club 3 Años.

I think I like it better than the 3, for Mojitos, too.

From the Canadian seller:

HAVANA CLUB AÑEJO BLANCO*

LCBO 633693 | 1140 mL bottle

Price: $ 32.35

Spirits, Rum, White Rum

40.0% Alcohol/Vol.

Made in: Cuba, Cuba

By: HAVANA CLUB INTERNATIONAL S.A.

Tasting Note

Clear with green hues; Gentle aromas of molasses with light vanilla and dried herb notes; Warm, rich textured on the palate with caramel nuances; Long delicate finish.

Serving Suggestion

In your favourite cocktail; Mojito

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.