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Hot Pot


dougery
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Chanko Nabe has to be the greatest version of hot pot (this hot pot is usually associated with Sumo wrestlers http://www.banzuke.com/chanko-nabe.

I like to prepare the broth with chicken stock, a little shiro miso, and soy. For the dipping sauce, I have a mortar 1/4 filled with toasted sesame seeds for each diner (having each person make their own ground sesame seeds. It's actually a great social activity) then just add a little broth from the pot and your ready to go.

Ingredients I find myself using over and over again in the pot are Napa, sliced side pork, tofu, chicken wings, shitake mushrooms, prawns, and to finish the dinner off mochi and udon.

Does anyone out there have some other versions of hot pot they would like to share?

"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

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One version I've had (once) involved your standard shabu shabu recipe (and the meal evolved along the lines of a typical shabu shabu experience)....except at the end, the host dumped in a bunch of edible chrysanthemum petals.

Lent a spicy, floral note to the broth.

Was quite an interesting experience to say the least.

Soba

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Very interesting... I'm wondering how the aroma would balance out with amount of sesame (1-2 cups of ground sesame seeds have quite an aroma!) used in Chanko Nabe? I will definitely give this a try next time I have a hot pot. What other types of stock have you used for yours?

"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

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Chris, it is one of the greatest meals, and the more people you have to enjoy this the better! There is a little initial investment to be made in a ceramic hot pot (you could actually use a shallow stock pot) and a portable burner you can put in the middle of your dinner table. I just bought my second burner for when we have larger dinner parties (8 - 10 people).

Add some hot sake and cold beer & your set for a guaranteed night of good food and great fun!

"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

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here is a nother nabe thread with a lot of chanko discussion:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=17115&st=0

I love nabe and chrysanthemum leaves are almost added to almost every one I make. I also like to add (depending on the nabe) thinly sliced carrots, thickly julienned daikon, shirataki or konnyaku, various mushrooms and various greens.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Chrysanthemum leaves? Hmmm... it seems this is a popular item to add. To be honest with you I have never (to my knowledge) had nabe with chrysanthemum leaves added.

Do you know of other alternatives for a dipping sauce? The two I use right now are either ground sesame seeds with broth or a soy, garlic, ginger, green onion, crushed chili pepper mixture, with a little broth.

"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

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I've never thought of ponzu... it would be a much cleaner taste than the ones I use. Do you like ponzu with nabe?

"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

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I've never thought of ponzu... it would be a much cleaner taste than the ones I use. Do you like ponzu with nabe?

I use ponzu with most nabes, especially with shabu shabu, yose-nabe and mizu-taki, or basically anything that is cooked in a simple broth.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I love ponzu with nabe. I also sometimes mix up a sesame-miso sauce for it. Aditionally I have this very small jar of some sort of green thick sauce from Japan that a friend brought back from me. I have no idea what it is but it's spicy ina way that is completely unlike anything else I've ever tasted. I generally don't make a broth for my nabes, other than tossing in a big piece of kombu when I fire up the pot, but just let the solid ingredients add the flavor to the water. I'l need to try more broth-oriented versions when autumn rolls around. I have this great tabletop nabe pot made by Zojirushi. It looks sort of like a flattened rice cooker - maybe and inch and a half deep and 10 inches wide with a removable pan (for the nabe) that sits on a wide solid heating element, Great for maintaining a nice slow simmer and it makes a fantastic risotto pan as well.

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