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BigboyDan

Migas - what is this dish?

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A baked dish, Chilquilas.

For the record, I checked all my Diana Kennedy books and Bayless too and couldn't find a baked chilaquiles recipe. Kennedy's Guanajuato version (one of many)is heated through in the oven to melt the cheese. I found one reference to them baked and it was from a book by a Nortena, so that would make sense if chilaquiles are baked in the southwest.

I'm going to try the Austin version of migas, if time permits, tomorrow morning.

I am thinking about making migas this weekend, one question. I really like carnitas and would like to add some, when should I add it to the dish? And would avocado be too much?

Now I need to head out to the supermercados in the east side of Tulsa to pick up some queso, which would you recommend that I use? I just hope the corn truck is there so I can pick get a steamed ear all dressed out with goodies to eat on the way home.


Edited by joiei (log)

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I am thinking about making migas this weekend, one question.  I really like carnitas and would like to add some, when should I add it to the dish? And would avocado be too much?

I'd suggest that you serve the carnitas on the side, along with sliced avocadoes, or make some quac, rather than incorporating them into the migas.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

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I am thinking about making migas this weekend, one question.  I really like carnitas and would like to add some, when should I add it to the dish? And would avocado be too much?

I'd suggest that you serve the carnitas on the side, along with sliced avocadoes, or make some quac.

Carnitas and guacamole are divine. I guess the carnitas just ain't rich enough by themselves!

I was going to make migas but I ended up making chilaquiles because I was a little confused by the migas recipe. Are the tortillas fried? Is that why they're crispy?

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Thanks for your help. I will think good thoughts of you all when I am chowing down in the morning. God, now I have to wait that long. It could be dinner because I have very little emotional balance for waiting right now, I think it has to do with this darn heat which isn't letting up here.

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I was going to make migas but I ended up making chilaquiles because I was a little confused by the migas recipe. Are the tortillas fried? Is that why they're crispy?

Because this is basically an improvised dish, there are all sorts of ways to do it. Some people pre-fry the tortillas and add them at the penultimate moment, so that they are crispy. I think that's best. But other home cooks tear the tortillas into strips and just toss them in as they're scrambling the eggs.

Really up to you, Señor.

:cool:

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Jaymes, I took your recommendation this past weekend and served the carnitas and the sliced avocado on the side of my migas and it was a huge hit. I liked it because it kept the dish from looking like one of those skillet breakfasts that Village Inn or Denny's serves. I had a little chopped cilantro to sprinkle on to finish. I will fix you breakfast any weekend.

edited to correct speling errors.


Edited by joiei (log)

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Jaymes,  I took your recommendation this past weekend and served the carnitas and the sliced avocado on the side of my migas and it was a huge hit.  I liked it because it kept the dish from looking like one of those skillet breakfasts that Village Inn or Denny's serves.

:laugh:

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I made the dish using the first post as a guide (I guess I made mee-GUS instead of Migas!) and it was good except I had trouble getting the eggs to set with the salsa in it. I don't think this is a problem particular to this dish. Don't eggs scramble better without stuff in them? The next round I cooked the fresh salsa a bit, removed it and then scrambled the eggs in the leftover oil and when mostly set added the salsa back and the tortillas.

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Pico de Gallo is not salsa. When using salsa, cook until dry, then add the eggs; cook all at a lower temperature than you would with eggs only. Temperature control is important...

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Pico de Gallo is not salsa. When using salsa, cook until dry, then add the eggs; cook all at a lower temperature than you would with eggs only. Temperature control is important...

Then what is it? I've see jicama dipped in chile powder called pico de gallo. Maybe it's a regional thing.

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Then what is it? I've see jicama dipped in chile powder called pico de gallo. Maybe it's a regional thing.

Oooh!! Now, we get into a question of the taxonomy of condiments and sauces. Salsa is a cold sauce made with a base of fresh chopped tomatoes, flavored with cilantro, chiles and onions. Pico de gallo is one form of salsa. A posting on Wikipedia identifies 8 different salsas, including pico de gallo, a/k/a salsa cruda, and guacamole. If you used a bottled salsa, it most likely was a salsa roja. Store bought salsa has a texture much smoother than pico de gallo; more like a tomato paste or chunky spaghetti sauce, and includes vinegar. That's why you have to cook it down before using in Miga's.

Also, jicama dipped in chile powder, that's not right. Next thing you know, you will tell me you put sprouts and avocados on everything and call it Mexican.


Edited by LDLee (log)

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Store bought salsa has a texture much smoother than pico de gallo; more like a tomato paste or chunky spaghetti sauce, and includes vinegar.

I haven't purchased store-bought salsa in 15 years!

But I'm confused. Pico de Gallo is salsa fresca, salsa cruda, salsa whatever, right? It's just chopped by hand and not blended. But I was having the problem of the eggs not setting well. I think as BBDan has said, is that you have to do it at a lower heat, or as I did, scramble the eggs and then add the extras once set abit but not too firm.

Also, jicama dipped in chile powder, that's not right. Next thing you know, you will tell me you put sprouts and avocados on everything and call it Mexican.

Well, if it matters, it was in Mexico!

I'm learning more and more it's hard to say what is "Mexican" in such a regional place. Although I will admit I've yet to see sprouts on the avocados.

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Rancho, when I did my migas, I cooked mine like you did. I cooked the eggs and tortillas to almost done before adding the salsa cruda. I did have chopped avocados and carnitas on the side to be added to taste. No sprouts though, somehow, I hardly associate sprouts with anything Mexican. Hippie food yes, Mexican no.

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I've see jicama dipped in chile powder called pico de gallo. Maybe it's a regional thing.

You'll have to forgive us in the Texas forum about our general lack of knowledge on that other pico de gallo that people mention from time to time. To us, pico de gallo is the roughly chopped salsa. But the powdered chile stuff can be found in Austin if you look for it (at places like Fiesta).


Edited by nacho (log)

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I've see jicama dipped in chile powder called pico de gallo. Maybe it's a regional thing.

You'll have to forgive us in the Texas forum about our general lack of knowledge on that other pico de gallo that people mention from time to time. To us, pico de gallo is the roughly chopped salsa. But the powdered chile stuff can be found in Austin if you look for it (at places like Fiesta).

There's nothing to forgive! My first thought when I hear Pico de Gallo is salsa cruda or salsa fresca, but BigboyDan said it wasn't a salsa so I was confused and trying to think of other things it could be.

Thanks for that link. It helps make the other meaning of Pico de Gallo make sense.

I'll stick to salsa cruda for my own sanity!

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I know I can find migas (MEE-gus) in Austin, does anyone have any recommendations to find this dish in north Dallas? Colleyville, Plano, Frisco, etc?

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I found a blog with detailed instructions and pictures, I am so lost without pictures, about how to make a proper dish of migas. The Pioneer Woman has done an excellent job of creating this marvelous dish. What is the name of that restaurant she talks about?

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I found a blog with detailed instructions and pictures,  I am so lost without pictures, about how to make a proper dish of migas.  The Pioneer Woman has done an excellent job of creating this marvelous dish.  What is the name of that restaurant she talks about?

Hard to say where she is talking about because many little Mexican restaurants here in Austin fit her description, and all of them will have migas-good ones too! They're kinda like

Chilaquiles with eggs!!

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