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[SEA] Teriyaki


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In this thread the idea of an in depth discussion of the area's teriyaki shops came up.

I thought I'd throw out the questions:

Where do you recommend people go for great teriyaki?

What do you look for in a teriyaki place?

Edited by DrewS (log)
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There's a place near my house that is the best I've had by some margin. It always makes me laugh to see that the cooks are Mexican. Can teriyaki ever be good enough to go out of your way for? Not sure, but if so, Buxx is.

Buxx Teriyaki

805 South 112th Street, Seattle, WA 98168

Edited by tighe (log)

Most women don't seem to know how much flour to use so it gets so thick you have to chop it off the plate with a knife and it tastes like wallpaper paste....Just why cream sauce is bitched up so often is an all-time mytery to me, because it's so easy to make and can be used as the basis for such a variety of really delicious food.

- Victor Bergeron, Trader Vic's Book of Food & Drink, 1946

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Kiku's on the Ave between 50th and 52nd has always been near and dear to my heart.

I'll second Kiku! If you get chicken teriyaki, get the chicken on the bone. Moist, flavorful, and terikayi sauce that's not too goopy. The tonkatsu (pork cutlet with egg) is also delicious.

One note, though: the place appears to have changed hands recently. I've only been there once since. A slightly different menu (perhaps a more Korean bent?) was posted. Most of the same Japanese favorites still seem to be there, though.

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I haven't liked Kiku since they changed hands, though haven't tried the teriyaki.

Tempura anything has been too greasy, doughy and at times undercooked, and whatever they now use for their udon soup base isn't as nice as what it used to be. Bummer, I used to love their food.

Pat

"I... like... FOOD!" -Red Valkyrie, Gauntlet Legends-

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Kiku's on the Ave between 50th and 52nd has always been near and dear to my heart.

I'll second Kiku! If you get chicken teriyaki, get the chicken on the bone. Moist, flavorful, and terikayi sauce that's not too goopy. The tonkatsu (pork cutlet with egg) is also delicious.

One note, though: the place appears to have changed hands recently. I've only been there once since. A slightly different menu (perhaps a more Korean bent?) was posted. Most of the same Japanese favorites still seem to be there, though.

Nooooooooooooooooooooooooo

Gimme what cha got for a pork chop!

-Freakmaster

I have two words for America... Meat Crust.

-Mario

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Yeah, good Teriyaki is almost impossible to find, but when you do, it's so convenient and satisfying. When I used to work downtown (6 years ago), John's Wok In near Western/University Street was good. It's a mini market with small teriyaki set up in the back. They have very interesting flavors such as indian curry teriyaki, etc. It was so so good. I don't know if they are still operating. A nice Korean family owned it back then.

Yes, Mexican/hispanic workers are often found in Teriyaki stores as well as Korean grocery stores. Most Teriyaki joints don't have a clue how to make their Teriyaki. It's good grilled (charbroiled is my fav) with a tasty sauce, not too goopy or salty (and the steamed veggies should be alive, not wilted. Salad dressing can make/break it too. Some U-dist joints offer radish kimchee which is a nice touch. In Japan, when you walk into Teriyaki joints, it's smoky, the bowls are filled charbroiled teriyaki meats and sometimes you get a boiled quail egg on top as a bonus. So delicious.

hungry_moose

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Yes, Mexican/hispanic workers are often found in Teriyaki stores as well as Korean grocery stores.

What cracks me up even more is that Taqueria Riconsito is now serving teriyaki. I haven't tried it.

Most women don't seem to know how much flour to use so it gets so thick you have to chop it off the plate with a knife and it tastes like wallpaper paste....Just why cream sauce is bitched up so often is an all-time mytery to me, because it's so easy to make and can be used as the basis for such a variety of really delicious food.

- Victor Bergeron, Trader Vic's Book of Food & Drink, 1946

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I'm not sure I know what *REAL* traditional teriyaki is supposed to be like...in the emerging list above, I've only tried Nasai (which was too sweet & goopy for my tastes.) But I must mention how ADDICTED I am to Yumiko's Teriyaki in the overlake area of Redmond -- behind Sears at 15003 NE 24th. :wub: Mmmm...I'll have to make another trip out there when I return to Seattle in August. :biggrin:

What do I look for?? The RICE has to be incredibly good. I like slightly-charred boneless (only so I'm not impeded from sucking it down fast! :laugh: ) chicken with a slightly thick, sweetish (not achingly so) sauce. Yumiko's comes with vinegared cabbage slaw on the side with I think helps cut through the sweet teriyaki sauce.

I'd be interested in hearing what the differences are between traditional vs. non-traditional teriyaki??

And does anyone have a recipe for REALLY good sauce?? :wub:

Edited by 22tango (log)

Luscious smell like love

Essential black milk worship

It whispers to me...

...Chocolate

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I'm a Nasai guy, although I usually get the Hot Chicken, which is more stir-fry than teriyaki. Their gyoza are horrible, and you never know whether your lunch is going to be any good (sometimes you get nastily overcooked chicken), which is probably why I always go back. It's that Skinnerian reinforcement thing.

Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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Hm, maybe we need to do a teriyaki tasting: one evening each participant is assigned to fetch teriyaki from their favorite place; we all taste each one and come up with wine-snob descriptions for them...

Winner goes head-to-head with the best Chinese BBQ in the area :smile:

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I'm throwing in a vote for the pork at Yasuko's Teriyaki in Magnolia (it doesn't seem to be the same elsewhere). It's more like a combination of Chinese-style BBQ pork with teriyaki sauce. They pull it out and cleaver it before you. Delicious and a huge plate is a deal at $5.50.

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