• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

trillium

Preserving Summer

328 posts in this topic

^Lemon verbena and lemon balm are both very nice with peaches.  I think Ferber puts the verbena with white peaches, but I only had yellow last year and it came out very nice.
Both sound lovely. Her peach-raspberry with cardamom sounds fabulous too.
Would you share your recipe for the chutney?  It sounds great.

I'm gonna taste how this batch turns out first before I post it. :smile: I tweak the seasonings each time.
Edited by hjshorter (log)

Heather Johnson

In Good Thyme

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
More sugar and more lemon juice to start with, then you can boil less

Thanks for the reply but the jam is almost inedible it is so sweet. The jam with the citrus had quite a lot of lemon juice in it as well.

The jam is not preseved by the sugar, but by being sterile from the boiling and bottled hot into in sealed bottles.

I can't tell you how many times I've read--on university extension sites, in cookbooks and this board--that you shouldn't alter the sugar, since that is part of what preserves the jam and otherwise you might encourage yeast and mold. Do you think that is overkill, then, and sugar IS something I can play with?

I NEVER use that much sugar, been making jams for something like 18 years, nobody ever gets sick, occasionally a jar spoils rapidly after being opened. I make sure my jars are all sealed via a boiling bath. I usually use between 1/2 cup and 2 cups of sugar per 5 cups of fruit. I don't normally weight this, but this is definately less than 60% sugar. Play to your hearts content.

If you are not getting jelled consistency, then you might want to play with some pectins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks! I think I will experiment with the reduced sugar pectins next. So perhaps when I am reading not to reduce sugar they don't mean that anyone will get sick, but that it just might spoil after opening as you describe. That makes sense.

So when you are making your jam, do you just taste it to make sure the level of sweetness is right? And that is consistant with how sweet it will taste once it's been canned and stored? And do you have any problems getting it to gel, or do you use pectin? Thanks again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks! I think I will experiment with the reduced sugar pectins next. So perhaps when I am reading not to reduce sugar they don't mean that anyone will get sick, but that it just might spoil after opening as you describe. That makes sense.

So when you are making your jam, do you just taste it to make sure the level of sweetness is right? And that is consistant with how sweet it will taste once it's been canned and stored? And do you have any problems getting it to gel, or do you use pectin? Thanks again.

I have developed general rules of thumb. The only fruit that needs a lot of sugar and pectin is Strawberry, otherwise I have various methods more and less cooking, usually less sugar and sometimes pectin. I taste, but I often taste cold - e.g. test the gelling and let a little bit of my mix cool enough to really taste. Occasionally I made mistakes but usually they are well received! My latest too sweet item is a concoction of peaches and cherries - a little too sweet, but oh so fine! My apricot and plum (both of which I'm known for) are much less sweet, usually made without pectin and yes I taste. They are both much closer to 8:1 (cups of fruit to sugar).

If I want gelling action without too much cooking time, e.g. a fresh fruit tasting jam, then I do either or both of adding low methoxyl pectin (Pomona's most readily avail) and/or adding some fruit close to the end of cooking. I also sometimes remove the fruit solids after first boil, reduce down all the liquids, and add solids back in before jarring. All this while cooking away ... have fun and feel free to PM me with specifics if needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you so much. That is very helpful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, my day started at about 10:30 am with me picking organic strawberries and Saskatoon berries at a U pick it. I picked for 4 hours and had to leave for other committments. This evening I processed all my strawberries and I have a portion of saskatoon berries draining in a jelly bag...for jelly jam!! I am tired!! Tomorrow I will attempt saskatoon pie. i am terrible at pie crusts but am pursuing perfection!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

does anyone make fruit pastes? I wanted to try to make a blackberry paste if possible


why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just tried making jam for the first time this month, and I'm amazed at how much better it is than even my favorite store brands.

I've made the plain strawberry jam, the praline milk jam, and am in the process of making the kiwi lemon jam, all from Ferber's book. The strawberry did not want to set, so I ended up adding a package of liquid pectin. And after that, it was perfect. Gorgeous whole strawberries in translucent red jelly. I don't know why I bothered with the whole sterile process -- it's all gone now (we ate three jars and gave three away, which have also been eaten).

The praline milk jam is also really good and really interesting. I made the hazelnut praline powder, and blanched, dried, and ground the almonds, so it ended up being much more time-intensive than I anticipated. I was concerned that the milk-sugar solution would never reduce -- four hours over a double boiler did not thicken it at all. I transfered all of it to my saucier to simmer over direct heat and that speeded everything up nicely, and there was no burning. And then when I added the two types of ground nuts, it basically became the texture of peanut butter. Really interesting stuff! It's as if dulce de leche and nutella somehow mated and this milk jam was their offspring.

The kiwi isn't finished yet, but the flavor of the syrup so far is outstanding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mango-lime is now on the shelf. I used Ferber's recipe and added about 1/4 cup of key lime juice. I'm finding that her ratio of 1 kilo of fruit to 800 grams of sugar works very well with many fruits, even when you can't find a good recipe. And I haven't made anything without maceration since I saw the first batch come out so beautifully.

I just picked up a box of Weck jars from Craigslist - I need more fruit!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_7620_135_13765.jpg

Golden Raspberry, The variety is Fall Gold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_25849_641_51230.jpg

My first batches of preserves ever. The mixed berries were wonderful - all local. Strawberry, raspberry & blueberry. For the spiced peach I simmer the fruit with cinnamon sticks and slices of fresh ginger. :wub: And there was nothing wring with the blueberry nectarine - though once cooked, it was mostly blueberry. I can't wait for next summer!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pam R, if you are like me, you won't be able to wait for next summer. Once you start, it can be hard to stop. :smile: And everyone's jars look so pretty! I'm jealous of people who live where there are all these wonderful berries. Someday I'll have a garden...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem is that all the local berries are gone. I'll have to wait until next summer to get something that tastes like this. . .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know the title says "preserving summer", but as I live on the bottom of the planet, I have just finished saving winter! :laugh:

Had a gift of a very large bag of Seville oranges given to me. Of course I made marmalade - which has come out beautifully. The only price for the oranges is that I had to give a jar of marmalade to the tree owner.

Will post some pictures shortly - once I have worked it out. :raz:


Rose&Thorn

Every Rose has it's Thorn

My Blog : Homemade Heaven

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found this season's peaches to be so amazing here in the mid-atlantic region that I couldn't resist making peach preserves. And peach chutney.

I just bought some local pears at Maple Acre Farms in Plymouth Meeting. Thinking of making something pear-gingerish.

What local items have served as your preserving muse this season?

Eileen


Eileen Talanian

HowThe Cookie Crumbles.com

HomemadeGourmetMarshmallows.com

As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists. ~Joan Gussow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

strawberry/chocolate preserves (chocolate liquour).

I couldn't do peaches, cause I couldn't get any decent one's. No figs either, though I usually put up a ton of them in August.

I sincerely want to make some mint jelly before the holidays and pair them with a beautiful cinnammon one I make for the red/green effect. I should get on that, soon...later...when it's cooler.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Picked up some white peaches and some nectarines on the way home from work yesterday. Using the Mes Confitures Yellow and Yellow Peach recipe I made a batch that I finished cooking and bottled today. The 5 minute timing suggested to get the syrup up to 105ºC was way off, and after I added the fruit again it was a lot longer than 5 minutes to get to the set point. What sort of timing are you finding these recipes take?

With the leftover fruit I repeated the recipe adding 200 grams of fresh ginger that I had julienned. It's doing it's first day simmer in my copper preserving pan right now, and it smells amazing.

Quick question. It's been a long time time since I preserved anything that didn't require added pectin except marmalade. Testing the set for marmalade I put it on a plate from the freezer and watch for bits of jell to form. What have you been seeing on the plate when you test the set and are satisfied it is ready?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It takes me almost 30 minutes to get up to her temperature (I've used a number of pans), and then I have to be very vigilant, because it can scorch very easily if I don't shut it off right at 105c/221f.

I've made the plain strawberry jam, the praline milk jam, and am in the process of making the kiwi lemon jam, all from Ferber's book. The strawberry did not want to set

The exception to what I said above was her strawberry, which would not set. I boiled and boiled and finally gave up. It does make very good syrup for ice cream sodas.

After about 12 batches, I still haven't made my perfect jam. I find Christine Ferber's too sweet, but I don't often don't like the texture of low-sugar pectin jams It's been funny-the low sugar pectin blueberry was great, but the peach jelled practically into a solid!


Edited by kiliki (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried the strawberry jam again, and it just doesn't set without pectin for me. And actually, I do have another batch all jarred up (I was hoping it would somehow just set up, given enough time) that never set that I'll have to reboil, add more citrus and pectin to. The kiwi lemon jam was fine (I added pectin to that one too), though not exactly to my taste (even though I love fresh kiwi), so I gave most of it away. It was good with cheese (especially a double cream gouda) and probably would have made a good tart topping, but really sweet gelled kiwi is just not a favorite taste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What sort of timing are you finding these recipes take?

.....(snipped)...

It's doing it's first day simmer in my copper preserving pan right now, and it smells amazing. 

This is interesting, because I assumed that my longer cooking times were due to my using a high walled pot instead of a preserving pan. I end up having to cook for twenty to thirty minutes as well, and I am using a thermometer to gauge the set point. I was actually considering buying a copper preserving pan, in part to cut down on cooking time (but mainly because they are so beautiful). But you are having the same issue with the pan? Is it possible that fruits here have a higher water content?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is interesting, because I assumed that my longer cooking times were due to my using a high walled pot instead of a preserving pan.  I end up having to cook for twenty to thirty minutes as well, and I am using a thermometer to gauge the set point.  I was actually considering buying a copper preserving pan, in part to cut down on cooking time (but mainly because they are so beautiful).  But you are having the same issue with the pan?  Is it possible that fruits here have a higher water content?

My copper preserving pan, while still wider at the top than the bottom, is still rather tall.

I got the part in Mes Confitures where it said to take the juice to 105º C, but are you also taking it to 105º c when you've added the fruit? I don't think mine has ever gotten above 102º when I see the changes she describes - the foam disappearing and the bubbles changing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every year I attend the Eg Heartland Gathering. I'm famous for my fig jam which I always bring to pair with the cheese platter. The jar I brought this year was my last jar so I thought I'd better make some for next years( bigger, badder) event in Chicago.

I havent seen figs in our small town so I picked up a pint in Michigan at Meijer. It was $2.00. Of course, wouldnt you know that our town's grocery store( Independent, part of Loblaws) has a case of figs on sale for 5.99 or a pint for 1.99. If they have a case, I'll be making a lot more fig jam today :biggrin:

Anyway, I made this 2 weeks ago. Figs are high in pectin so I never use commercial pectin. I use a little bit of allspice, cinnamon and ground ginger. I used about 1/2 cup of sugar and 3/4 cup of apple juice. This batch only gave me 1.5 pint jars. I processed 1 jar and refridgerated half a jar.

gallery_25969_665_125585.jpg

gallery_25969_665_8402.jpg

chopped

gallery_25969_665_797854.jpg

spiced mixture

gallery_25969_665_1007596.jpg

boiling

gallery_25969_665_70530.jpg

1 jar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I got the part in Mes Confitures where it said to take the juice to 105º C, but are you also taking it to 105º c when you've added the fruit?  I don't think mine has ever gotten above 102º when I see the changes she describes - the foam disappearing and the bubbles changing.

I have not in the past, but I did with the last batch I made with mangoes. I haven't eaten any yet, but the set seems to be a bit firmer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I tried the strawberry jam again, and it just doesn't set without pectin for me. And actually, I do have another batch all jarred up (I was hoping it would somehow just set up, given enough time) that never set that I'll have to reboil, add more citrus and pectin to. The kiwi lemon jam was fine (I added pectin to that one too), though not exactly to my taste (even though I love fresh kiwi), so I gave most of it away. It was good with cheese (especially a double cream gouda) and probably would have made a good tart topping, but really sweet gelled kiwi is just not a favorite taste.

Well I'm so glad to hear I'm not the only one that has trouble getting her jam to set. I've only used Pomona's low sugar pectin, where you mix the pectin with the sugar before adding it to the fruit. So with regular pectin you can just add some at the end if your jam won't set? If that's the case I sure wish I'd known that earlier in the summer.

Calipoutine, have you ever made your jam without the apple juice? Do you need it for the pectin?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.