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Gumbo, Jambalaya, Etouffee, Creole...


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I served it today as the side for my specials and it was a huge hit.  Not one single person knew what it was, but everyone enjoyed it.  Thanks again.

I had M-C at a party that Jacquimos catered in slidell, LA last fall, Chef Jack put crawfish tails in it as well, very good.

Veni Vidi Vino - I came, I saw, I drank.
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I served it today as the side for my specials and it was a huge hit.  Not one single person knew what it was, but everyone enjoyed it.  Thanks again.

Great. I am glad they liked it and you got to introduce them to somethign new.

Preach not to others what they should eat, but eat as becomes you and be silent. Epicetus

Amanda Newton

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I do my MC almost the same as Amanda's, but I use butter (no stock) and half-and-half (no eggs)! I think I'll try using the stock first, then adding half-and-half.

It's also really good if you make a succotash with field peas and corn. I particularly like White Acre peas for this.

I think I know one item that will be on the menu for Sunday evening when we have some friends coming over after we spend the afternoon working in the greyhound adoption kennel! Off to the farmers' market tomorrow AM!

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  • 7 years later...
On 6/19/2004 at 4:09 PM, NulloModo said:

Interesting, and while we are talking about the basics: Is the Roux simply a thickening agent, or does the browning process add appreciable taste to the finished product? Are there Roux-less gumbos, or gumbos with Roux made from things other than oil and wheat flour?

The roux definitely adds flavor and serves as a thickening agent.  This may be sacrilegious but I make large batches of roux in my oven, and then freeze in 1 cup portions so that we can prepare gumbo more frequently as I don't have time to stand watch over a sauté pan and stir frequently, waiting for flour to cook and roux to darken but not burn.  

 

Generally, I'll put 5 cups of oil and 5 cups of flour (thoroughly mixed, in a roasting pan)  in the oven at 375-400F for about an hour, until the desired color is achieved. Stir occasionally. We like a fairly dark roux. 

 

Turkey Gumbo is regularly served the day after holidays but we eat it all year round, in all of its variations including "vegetables only" gumbo. 

We serve over Calrose rice, it's a medium-grain rice. 

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