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Gumbo, Jambalaya, Etouffee, Creole...


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Yep. Nothing like good sweet shrimp in that buttery sauce. That was really a good batch of shrimp. I am glad I did the etouffee with it rather than a Shrimp Creole.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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This weekend the PBS station out of Los Angeles (KCET) ran an episode of "Julia and the Master Chefs". The guest chef was none other than a very calm, subdued Emeril Lagasse.

He made two dishes, a crab and crawfish boil (Julia's first) and Shrimp Etouffee.

When he made the roux for the etouffee, it was nothing like what I've seen on the eG Gumbo thread. His roux was almost the consistency of a thick oatmeal, not soupy at all. In fact, when he stirred it, you could see the bottom of the pot. It was that thick.

He said to make a lot of roux and then take a majority of it and put it in your fridge for future use. So it's possible his ratio of flour-to-fat was off but I doubt it because if he screwed up then you know they would have re-shot the roux-making.

Did anyone else see this episode? Is a thick roux heresy? Does the end-result differ from the normal "soupy" rouxs?

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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I am in the mood.  I made a gumbo once, and it was really good, but it was back in my pre-eGullet times.  I think I have the roux part down pat (but I'm always open to improvement). I would love to see discussion about your take on the differences in these dishes, your preferences, a favorite recipe, stories, etc.  Do you have any recipe "secrets" you will share?

Maybe I missed it; but, I didn't see a recipe for Jambalaya in this thread so I will post one I've made for years. It was originally based on one from New Orleans Take Out in Madison, WI. As far as I can tell it is a fairly authentic Creole style Red Jambalaya. I usually substitute andouille sausage for the ham in the recipe. For the liquid part, you are looking for a total amount of 3 Cups combined of the reserved tomato juice and stock. Really the best thing to make this in is a well seasoned cast iron 5 quart dutch oven.

Erik

------------------

New Orleans Take Out Jamabalaya

Salt 1 tsp.

Cayenne Pepper 1 tsp.

White Pepper ½ tsp.

Black Pepper ½ tsp.

Bay Leaves 2

Dried Thyme 1 tsp.

Sage ¼ tsp.

Butter 2 TBSP

Ham, Medium dice ½ lb.

Chicken, Medium dice ½ lb.

Celery, Medium dice 1 cup

Onion, Medium dice 1 cup

Green pepper, Medium dice 1 cup

Garlic, minced 1 TBSP

1 28 oz. can whole tomatoes, liquid reserved

Chicken Stock 2 ½ cup

Long Grain Rice 1 ½ cup

Method: Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees. Combine seasonings; reserve. Heat pan slowly. Add butter; melt. Turn heat to high; add ham. Stir frequently until brown. Add chicken; cook for 5 minutes. Stir often scraping pan bottom as needed. Stir in seasonings and half celery, onion, and green peppers. Add garlic. Stir constantly until vegetables are clear, for 6-8 minutes. Add remaining vegetables and tomatoes. Stir in tomato juice and chicken stock and rice. Bring to a simmer. If mixture is in 2-qt. Pot, them transfer to an 8x8 pan. Cover and place dutch oven or pan in oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Serve with sweet crusty french bread. Serves 4 with leftovers.

New Orleans Take Out Restaurant, Madison Wisconsin

Edited by eje (log)

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Thanks, Erik! I hadn't realized that there had not been a Jambalaya recipe posted. Looks like a good idea when in the mood for a Creole dish cooked with the rice mixed in... and an easy, cook ahead recipe.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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I have seen the thick roux's used before on cooking shows but not really in home kitchens over the years. Or at least not for gumbos. I have even made them when following a recipe calling for a bit of light roux. I am thinking that those proportions that lead to a thick roux like you saw are more of a classic French technique and more likely to show up in an etouffee or creole.

I think that the equal proportions of oil and flour are just easier to keep it all moving so you don't get burned spots. I am not sure how you would go to really dark with the thick stuff. I have never had a reason to try it.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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  • 7 months later...

I made my first etouffee tonight and wanted to share. It came out really well: spicy, rich, and perfect over rice.

gallery_9138_54_139649.jpg

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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  • 3 months later...

Oh, yes! I don't know what I would do without a couple of containers of gumbo in my freezer. That is why freezers were invented. :laugh:

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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  • 3 months later...

I've found it.

Until recently, I always used my maid's recipe for etouffee because it's quick and very good. It hasn't been of much use to me lately because it seems to work better with crawfish than shrimp (maybe it needs the fat) and I haven't been able to find peeled crawfish tails that aren't frozen. I'm usually not particular about frozen food but I hate frozen crawfish. I could buy cooked crawfish and peel them myself but if I had to pick 10-20 lbs of crawfish, the recipe would no longer have the advantage of being something I can get started after work and have ready by suppertime. Besides, crawfish have been outrageously expensive this season.

Anyway, I decided to find a recipe that would go better with shrimp than my old one. I looked in my favorite cookbook (La Bouche Creole by Leon Soniat) and found a recipe for the best etouffee I've ever had. Here it is:

3 T. margarine (I used butter)

1 c. chopped onions

1/2 c. chopped celery

1/2 c. chopped bell pepper

3 T. flour

2 T. tomato paste

2 c. stock

1/2 c. chopped green onions

2 T. chopped parsley (I didn't bother with it)

1 t. salt

1/2 t. poultry seasoning

1/4 t. black pepper

1/8 t. cayenne

Cook the onions, celery, and bell peppers in the butter until soft, then stir in flour and cook until brown. I did it the other way around--made the roux first then added the vegetables. Stir in the tomato paste, then the stock. Add the seasonings and green onions and simmer until it reaches your preferred thickness. Add the shrimp or crawfish and cook until done.

I doubled the recipe and strongly recommend that you do the same (if not quadruple it) because it does not make much. Anybody who likes a good pot of etouffee should try this recipe out. If you know of a better way to make etouffee I'd love to hear it.

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Harry, the recipe doesn't indicate the amoount of shrimp/crawfish, and as you stated, it doesn't make much as written. Does the original provide a clue?

The original says to use a cup and a half of crawfish tails. I doubled the recipe and used probably three or four pounds of shrimp.

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Harry,

I love etouffee as well and one question for you... I learnt to cook the vegggies first then add the flour for the roux. However you did it the other way around. The key thing here for etouffee is letting the roux turn brown in color - did you notice any difference - veggies first or second?

Brian

Brian Misko

House of Q - Competition BBQ

www.houseofq.com

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I've found it.

Until recently, I always used my maid's recipe for etouffee because it's quick and very good. It hasn't been of much use to me lately because it seems to work better with crawfish than shrimp (maybe it needs the fat) and I haven't been able to find peeled crawfish tails that aren't frozen. I'm usually not particular about frozen food but I hate frozen crawfish. I could buy cooked crawfish and peel them myself but if I had to pick 10-20 lbs of crawfish, the recipe would no longer have the advantage of being something I can get started after work and have ready by suppertime. Besides, crawfish have been outrageously expensive this season.

Anyway, I decided to find a recipe that would go better with shrimp than my old one. I looked in my favorite cookbook (La Bouche Creole by Leon Soniat) and found a recipe for the best etouffee I've ever had. Here it is:

3 T. margarine (I used butter)

1 c. chopped onions

1/2 c. chopped celery

1/2 c. chopped bell pepper

3 T. flour

2 T. tomato paste

2 c. stock

1/2 c. chopped green onions

2 T. chopped parsley (I didn't bother with it)

1 t. salt

1/2 t. poultry seasoning

1/4 t. black pepper

1/8 t. cayenne

Cook the onions, celery, and bell peppers in the butter until soft, then stir in flour and cook until brown. I did it the other way around--made the roux first then added the vegetables. Stir in the tomato paste, then the stock. Add the seasonings and green onions and simmer until it reaches your preferred thickness. Add the shrimp or crawfish and cook until done.

I doubled the recipe and strongly recommend that you do the same (if not quadruple it) because it does not make much. Anybody who likes a good pot of etouffee should try this recipe out. If you know of a better way to make etouffee I'd love to hear it.

Almost, but not quite. No roux with seafood, just in my humble opinion. Thicken it at the end of cooking with some corn starch and cold water. Also, do bother with the parsley -- it does make a difference. And I use more onion.

No bay leaves? No thyme? I just might have to sue you. :biggrin:

Rhonda

Edited by PopsicleToze (log)
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  • 1 year later...

Since I just challenged you to stop at Prejean's next time you are driving across South Louisiana, I would highly reccomend that you get a bowl of their Artichoke and Shrimp Bisque. It's pretty otherworldly. Thick, buttery, but with an actual flavoring of artichokes ( as opposed to some washed out canned hearts being thrown in) and loaded with shrimp. You'll be glad you did.

I read this thread when it popped up last year and subsequently made gumbo, but this time around this shrimp and artichoke bisque has me intrigued. Mayhaw Man, any idea how they do it?

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I made a big old pot of Gumbo, for the first time, last week with sausage, ham, oysters, shrimps and crab.

I made a medium dark brick roux but chickened out taking over to a black roux.

It was amazing and I was able to freeze some too.

Etouffee is next!

**************************************************

Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

--------------------

One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

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  • 11 months later...

I'm doing Cajun specials next week at the cafe. Anyone have a good maque choux recipe that they can recommend? Its funny because when I lived in NO I had never had maque choux. Then when I moved to Indianapolis a little cajun place opened up (Y'ats) and that's when I discovered m-c. Its been one of my favorites ever since. Thanks in advance.

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I'm doing Cajun specials next week at the cafe.  Anyone have a good maque choux recipe that they can recommend?  Its funny because when I lived in NO I had never had maque choux.  Then when I moved to Indianapolis a little cajun place opened up (Y'ats) and that's when I discovered m-c.  Its been one of my favorites ever since.  Thanks in advance.

This is from my favorite cajun cookbook, Cajun-Creole Cooking by Terry Thompson.

I am not sure of the rules of posting cookbook recipes, so I will give an approximation.

Saute corn kernels (fresh or 2 cans whole kernel canned), large onion, garlic, and bell peppers in bacon drippings until wilted and slightly browned. Stir often. Add 2 chopped tomatoes (peeled), salt, pepper, a touch of sugar and cayenne. Stir to combine and add 1 cup of chicken stock. Reduce heat and simmer until liquid has evaporated. Turn heat up a little and add 1 cup of milk. She then calls for adding 2 beaten eggs and cooking till thick. I never add the eggs. I bet cream instead of milk would be good too.

PM me if you need more detail.

Okra and tomatoes are a popular cajun dish and the main ingredients are in season right now (if you can find okra where you live).

Preach not to others what they should eat, but eat as becomes you and be silent. Epicetus

Amanda Newton

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