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Do You Like Indian Food and Japanese Food Too?


Jinmyo
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I have always loved Indian foods of all persuasions and regions. But I went through a period when I thought, "Japanese? Feh, boring." (Yes, I blush :blush: to admit that.) Because I was not focusing on flavor, only on texture and wallop. Thankfully, I'm over that phase.

Although I still have not yet tried natto for a second time.

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somebody explain japanese curry to me. how did it happen? i like it though. korean too.

sometimes i think that if i was forced to only eat one cuisine every day for the rest of my life it might be sushi (the whole range of it). usually comes down to choosing between sushi, bengali, and sichuan. why i spend so much mental energy worrying about such things i honestly don't know.

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I love them both. I enjoy the subtlety of Japanese food, and enjoy the harmonious seasonings and spices of Indian food. Very different cuisines, but I find both to be delicious.

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

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somebody explain japanese curry to me. how did it happen?

The history of curry in Japan:

http://www.house-foods.com/imported_products.html

interesting

i have to say that i'm dubious about this first bit:

Although there are many opinions about the origin of the "Japanese Curry", it seems most certain that India is the home of curry. The proof is that the origin of the word "curry" which means "soup" can be traced to Tamil language in South India. Another strong clue is that Budda (Shaka) was the first to cook curry. Indian legend says that Buddha (Shaka) taught people how to mix nuts and fruits. The use of curry first became popular as a miraculous way to achieve for eternal youth and longevity. Only later was it used as a seasoning. Some legends say that miraculous element was called "Coorry", and others that the area which Budda (Shaka) fist evangelized was called "Curry".

but the stuff after seems fair enough. i'm only aware of what they call "curry roux" being sold in japan/korea in block form--is powder used significantly too? and i don't know that the "roux" is used anywhere in india.

i bring all this up because it seems important to note, as we discuss japanese and indian as polarized/polarizing tastes, that there is also a major area of overlap in the general cuisines.

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i bring all this up because it seems important to note, as we discuss japanese and indian as polarized/polarizing tastes, that there is also a major area of overlap in the general cuisines.

Like, y'mean, some kind of daring New Indo-Japanese Fusion thing?

Uh-oh. My brain is full. I'd better go home now.

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I used to love it until I was in Madras for a month. The curry every day for lunch was ok, but the curry powder in everything for breakfast was just to much!

"Curry powder" every day in Madras? :hmmm::huh:

Are you sure?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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food:  what's not to like?

I have to agree with Tommy.

and me too! I want to agree with everyone else so far too!

But is that so surprising given the spirit of eG? i.e. that not only do we love good food and are prepared to experiment?

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I adore both. I prefer many of my foods mind-searingly hot, but when Im sick (thankfully a rare occurance- due to the spicy foods, perhaps?) Japanese soups are the BEST! And if my husband had his say, I wouldnt be 'allowed' to eat too much curry. It tends to have, ah, after-aromatics that he finds unbearable.

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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some "plucked out of the air" reasons why i love Indian food: :smile:

the breads, the pulses/legumes, the spice blends...

ditto Japanese food:

the clear soups, the elegance of presentation (unless it's like, okonomiyaki :laugh: ), the variety of fermented foods, the regional and seasonal emphasis on ingredients/preparation...

i love both very much, to answer the question.

"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."

--Isak Dinesen

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Indian breads are one of the components of the cuisine that really stand out for me.

Lovely parathas...

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I like Japanese food too and their presentation is visual poetry. If I lived where no quality Indian food was available, I might start eating more Japanese food .

The Japanese sure love Indian curry:

Curry museum in Japan

and

history of curry in japan

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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I love both. If presented with the usual "if you had to give up one at gunpoint...?" question, I'd just sigh and flip a coin. And mourn whichever choice it was that lost.

Being able to enjoy Indian and Japanese food feels like letting different parts of my nose and tongue have their turn to come out and play.

Pat

"I... like... FOOD!" -Red Valkyrie, Gauntlet Legends-

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I was always sort of mystified at never seeing (though I may have missed it) an Indian chef on Iron Chef.

For myself, if I had to choose, I would probably pick Indian food over, well, just about anything else. But, yes, having many choices is good too.

"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

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I was always sort of mystified at never seeing (though I may have missed it) an Indian chef on Iron Chef.

For myself, if I had to choose, I would probably pick Indian food over, well, just about anything else. But, yes, having many choices is good too.

given the judgement criteria i don't think indian chefs would have done well--as i recall the few thai chefs who were on didn't do well either. but morimoto did use indian ingredients every once in a while.

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