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Cream: [Extra] Heavy/Whipping, and Others


AlainV
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When a recipe calls for "heavy cream", I am always wondering what to use.

Around here, we have "liquid cream" also named "whipping cream" (crème liquide à fouetter ou crème fleurette), the same product but light (crème liquide allégée), "crème fraîche" and "double cream", which is in fact sour cream (crème épaisse).

The fat content varies from 12 % for the light stuff to 35 % for crème fraîche and double cream.

Could someone be kind enough to let me know the dairy product I can use instead of "heavy cream". I am so confused with the American dairy product names. :wacko:

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I noticed yesterday that my local Trader Joe's carried small bottles of "Heavy Cream". Does anyone know if this is real "heavy cream" or just something they are calling "heavy cream"? Would this be what AlainV is talking about?

edited to make pertinent

Edited by Toliver (log)

 

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Tim Oliver

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5{sterday that my local Trader Joe's carried small bottles of "Heavy Cream". Does anyone know if this is real "heavy cream" or just something they are calling "heavy cream"? Would this be what AlainV is talking about?

edited to make pertinent

Trader Joe's heavy cream is indeed heavy cream, higher fat content than whipping cream.

AND --- more importantly, it is not "ultra pasturized" - it develops more volume and can be used for making small batches of cheeses, etc. which is much more difficult with the ultra pasturized stuff.

It will keep in the fridge much longer than regular whipping cream, actually an amazing length of time after the "sell-by" date.

It is a good product.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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  • 7 months later...

Hi

I am new. This place is exciting. Please pardon me if there is a thread to my question already (in that case, can you direct me to it?)

I am not professional but I try to bake as much as possible. Currently I am getting my whipping cream from Costco ($2.99 for one quart, ultra-pasturized). I cannot afford the better-tasting stuff @ Trader Joe's as it is a much smaller bottle. Where do the professionals get it? I've heard the ultra-pasturized stuff is "bad" but what are my choices? What about "manufecturing cream" from Smart and Final? (I used that and it tasted similar to whipping cream to me). I know there are fat percentage differences but it's not like they are listed.

Thank you for your help. I am trying to switch career to baking... :wink:

"Mom, why can't you cook like the iron chef?"
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We use two types of heavy cream. When we want whipped cream that will whip very stiff and hold up for a least a day, we use Challenge brand ultrapasturized cream. I believe it has some stabilizers added to make up for the extra processing. For other stuff like creme brulee we use a standard local supermarket brand that's just regular pasturized. I don't think there's any fat percentage difference between the two.

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My local Smart & Final carries Berkeley Farms Manufacturing cream in 1/2 gallon containers. I am not sure why it is called manufacturing cream, but it is basically a heavy whipping cream. The price varies but is usually $6-8, which is as good a price as I can find anywhere.

S&F also carries butter at a good price and their products are usually very fresh.

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We use two types of heavy cream. When we want whipped cream that will whip very stiff and hold up for a least a day, we use Challenge brand ultrapasturized cream. I believe it has some stabilizers added to make up for the extra processing. For other stuff like creme brulee we use a standard local supermarket brand that's just regular pasturized. I don't think there's any fat percentage difference between the two.

Thank you, is the Challenge brand available to "lay" people like us?

As far as butter goes...right now I've been getting the 4 1-lb blocks from Sams. I don't know why Costco will not come out with an unsalted butter. Will check Smart and Final again. Last time I bought their margarine and it was very disappointing, all oxidized, perhaps no one likes margarine these days....

"Mom, why can't you cook like the iron chef?"
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one more question. Some recipes I got from Asia would always distinguish between "plant-origin" whipping cream (I guess that's not even a cream, it's like a whipped topping) and "animal-origin" (normal dairy stuff I assume). The "manufecturing cream"--is that the real dairy stuff? Does anyone use the "plant" stuff? I think I tried it once and it was yucky. Is there any use of it?

Thank you.

"Mom, why can't you cook like the iron chef?"
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I've heard the ultra-pasturized stuff is "bad" but what are my choices? 

Ultra-pasteurized is heated to a much higher temp than cream labeled "pasteurized," though for a shorter time. This kills more bugs, so it has a longer shelf life, though it is a little less full-flavored, and some people notice more of a cooked or off flavor in ultra-pasteurized. Most supermarket brands are UP. Most supermarket brands also contain thickeners and stabilizers. Whether any of this makes any difference to you depends on taste and what you're going to do with it. For myself, when I want the cleanest cream flavor, like in ice cream, I'll go to the Whole Foods and get something particular, whereas if I'm just using a little to finish a soup, say, I'll use whatever the local market has.

"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

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Manufacturers cream is not ultra-pasturized so it can be used for anything for which you use heavy cream.

It is better for use in sauces because it does not "break" as easily as the other types of cream.

I buy it to make cheeses as it works where the ultra pasturized will not.

I use it all the time and get it at Smart & Final, the brand out here is Alta-Dena which is a local dairy with excellent products.

I also use the "Grade A Table cream" sold in Mexican markets - this is sweet cream, not the "Agria" sour cream also sold in a similar container.

It has some additives but I like it as it is extremely thick, spoonable more than pourable and whips up beautifully and holds well for long periods. I use it in cooking all the time with excellent results.

I avoid the "ultra-pasturized" products as much as possible.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I  also use the "Grade A Table cream" sold in Mexican markets - this is sweet cream, not the "Agria" sour cream also sold in a similar container. 

Is that higher butterfat than heavy cream?

"I think it's a matter of principle that one should always try to avoid eating one's friends."--Doctor Dolittle

blog: The Institute for Impure Science

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I will have to check.

It is here.

That is, the brand I use most.

The stuff is delicious as-is. In fact, my housekeeper will spoon some into a little dish and eat it plain. (However she is one of these very thin people who eat like a horse and never gains weight.)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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one more question.  Some recipes I got from Asia would always distinguish between "plant-origin" whipping cream (I guess that's not even a cream, it's like a whipped topping) and "animal-origin" (normal dairy stuff I assume). 

Plant-origin whipped cream is cool whip and other non-dairy whipped stuff, which are made from vegetable oils and corn syrup.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Some time ago I checked with the Dairy Dept. of Hannaford (Maine local Supermarkets)

Please note: Half & Half 8/12 % Fat

Light Cream 18 % Fat

Whipping Cream 30 % Fat

Heavy Cream 36 % Fat

Seldom look wheather UP or not

Also if your dairy cream does not have a 'Stabilizer',

Supermarkets in general carry in their 'Gourmet' / 'Import' section one made by "Dr. Oetker - of Germany", it's very good.

Peter
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I  also use the "Grade A Table cream" sold in Mexican markets

I really love this stuff, but I never thought to whip it... Mainly because it is more expensive than whipping or manufacturing cream. It is definitely a lot thicker and has a great flavor. I may try whipping it sometime, but only if I run out of tamales, tacos, or tostadas...

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We use Berkeley Farms Manufacturing Cream at school. Since I'm not in the habit of shopping at Smart & Final, and don't go through a lot of cream, I generally buy Trader Joe's. Last week, their organic house brand was 10¢ cheaper per pint than the regular stuff.

"I just hate health food"--Julia Child

Jennifer Garner

buttercream pastries

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Thanks for the replys. The Mexican stuff is really interesting. My nurses (I am a baker stuck in a physician's coat, both wear white anyways, comforting)are all mexican and they always tell me about how good the crema is, but no one ever mentioned WHIPPING it! That sounds exciting. We have plenty here in the local markets. Might be a bit expensive but should test it. It seems like there are different kinds--is the "Grade A Table Cream" the only whippable one?

The problem with the manufecturing cream is it has such a short date. I guess the price you pay for not having it ultra-pasturized.

I really like the Tradef Joe stuff (heavy cream), I will bet it's not ultra-pasturized, but it's small. The last time I forgot about one bottle in my fridge and it was like a month past the date. I sadly opened it just to see and it smelled perfectly fine. I think I made a small strawberry/cream/genoise cake and my nurses and I devoured it. (no food posioning) Perhaps the NOT-ultrapasturized ones don't go bad that quickly....but I hate to risk.

"Mom, why can't you cook like the iron chef?"
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A good tip if you use Ultra-pasteurized cream in sauces, ice cream, brulee (custard in general) only bring the cream to a slight simmer, not a full simmer or quick boil like most recipes state. This will keep its flavor better without breaking down its structure too much.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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This kills more bugs, so it has a longer shelf life, though it is a little less full-flavored, and some people notice more of a cooked or off flavor in ultra-pasteurized.

I'm one of those people. Ultra pasteurized cream is a scourge. If I happened across the numbnut that sold cream distributors on this idea, I'd throttle him/her.

The most frustrating aspect of UHT cream is that, because of the high fat content, the non UHT stuff almost NEVER goes bad. I've used non UHT cream that was 4 months old and it was flawless. A little lumpy perhaps, but nothing a good shake didn't resolve. UHT is purely aesthetic - it doesn't lump. People freak out when they see lumps.

There is no culinary trend that makes me sadder than the shift towards ultra pasteurization. Spilled milk may not be worth crying over, but this stuff definitely is.

I really like the Tradef Joe stuff (heavy cream), I will bet it's not ultra-pasturized, but it's small.  The last time I forgot about one bottle in my fridge and it was like a month past the date.  I sadly opened it just to see and it smelled perfectly fine.  I think I made a small strawberry/cream/genoise cake and my nurses and I devoured it.  (no food posioning)  Perhaps the NOT-ultrapasturized ones don't go bad that quickly....but I hate to risk.

Stick with the Trader Joes heavy cream. And don't sweat the date. Just smell it - you'll know when it's off. It will get lumpy - that's perfectly normal. Celebrate the lumps. It means that you haven't been cursed with a substandard product.

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Just to say I am jelous of every one who can easily buy none UHT cream, since moving to the states it has been my most hated ingredient, I live in a town where even the gourmet market only carries UHT. Ugg. The nearest whole foods is a 45min drive and involves bridges tokens etc.

If any one thinks I am slightly obsessed with dairy products I am. I grew up in Guernsey in the Channel Islands, where guernsey cows reign supreme and the cream is yellow and can hardly be whipped before it turns to butter. :smile:

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